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Who’s Really to Blame for Last Night’s Oscar Debacle?

The last five minutes of the 89th Academy Awards delivered one of the most shocking moments in Oscar history. For viewers who called it quits before the final trophy was handed out, here’s what happened: Two minutes into the acceptance speeches for La La Land’s Best Picture win, it was revealed that Damien Chazelle's musical wasn’t the rightful winner after all. Barry Jenkins's Moonlight was the true Best Picture winner, and the casts and crews of the two films awkwardly switched places on stage in a moment that was stranger than cinematic fiction.

You can watch the scene play out below:

Warren Beatty, who opened the envelope and then handed the card to his fellow presenter, Faye Dunaway, to read, has received a lot of flak for the incident online. But according to Mashable, the London-based accounting and professional services firm PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) is really to blame for the mix-up.

For years, the PwC accountants have managed the Academy Awards ceremony. Last night, officials made the egregious error of handing the envelope containing the Best Actress winner to Beatty instead of the one for Best Picture. The company released a statement, which read:

"We sincerely apologize to 'Moonlight,' 'La La Land,' Warren Beatty, Faye Dunaway, and Oscar® viewers for the error that was made during the award announcement for Best Picture. The presenters had mistakenly been given the wrong category envelope and when discovered, was immediately corrected. We are currently investigating how this could have happened, and deeply regret that this occurred."

You can witness Beatty’s confusion upon opening the envelope in the video above. After reading Emma Stone’s name listed when he was supposed to be announcing Best Picture, the stumped actor passed the buck to his partner—and Bonnie and Clyde co-star—Dunaway, who saw the words La La Land and read them immediately. So don’t blame the presenters; they were also victims of last night’s epically embarrassing oversight.

[h/t Mashable]

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26 Facts About LEGO Bricks

Since it first added plastic, interlocking bricks to its lineup, the Danish toy company LEGO (from the words Leg Godt for “play well”) has inspired builders of all ages to bring their most imaginative designs to life. Sets have ranged in size from scenes that can be assembled in a few minutes to 5000-piece behemoths depicting famous landmarks. And tinkerers aren’t limited to the sets they find in stores. One of the largest LEGO creations was a life-sized home in the UK that required 3.2 million tiny bricks to construct.

In this episode of the List Show, John Green lays out 26 playful facts about one of the world’s most beloved toy brands. To hear about the LEGO black market, the vault containing every LEGO set ever released, and more, check out the video above then subscribe to our YouTube channel to stay up-to-date with the latest flossy content.

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Of Buckeyes and Butternuts: 29 States With Weird Nicknames for Their Residents
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Tracing a word’s origin and evolution can yield fascinating historical insights—and the weird nicknames used in some states to describe their residents are no exception. In the Mental Floss video above, host John Green explains the probable etymologies of 29 monikers that describe inhabitants of certain states across the country.

Some of these nicknames, like “Hoosiers” and “Arkies” (which denote residents of Indiana and Arkansas, respectively) may have slightly offensive connotations, while others—including "Buckeyes," "Jayhawks," "Butternuts," and "Tar Heels"—evoke the military histories of Ohio, Kansas, Tennessee, and North Carolina. And a few, like “Muskrats” and “Sourdoughs,” are even inspired by early foods eaten in Delaware and Alaska. ("Goober-grabber" sounds goofier, but it at least refers to peanuts, which are a common crop in Georgia, as well as North Carolina and Arkansas.)

Learn more fascinating facts about states' nicknames for their residents by watching the video above.

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