CLOSE
iStock
iStock

11 Delicious Poutine Recipes to Make at Home

iStock
iStock

Though Canada doesn't have an official national food, it might as well be poutine. The glorious, hot combination of fries, cheese curds, and brown gravy was developed in Quebec in the 1950s, and versions of it have since spread to other countries. But if you can't find a restaurant nearby to celebrate National Poutine Day, try one of these recipes at home.

1. THE ULTIMATE POUTINE

Serious Eats admits that poutine is a simple dish, on paper, but the details are important. The fries must be hot and slightly crisp, the cheese must be good quality, and the gravy flavor is crucial. In their recipe for The Ultimate Poutine, you get instructions for making all three (yes, even the cheese), although some shortcuts are offered. The gravy is made with beef, chicken, and vegetables.

2. AUTHENTIC CANADIAN POUTINE

Tieghan Gerard at Half Baked Harvest offers a somewhat simpler recipe for Authentic Canadian Poutine. In her version, the potatoes are soaked in beer instead of being rinsed in water, and the gravy contains beer as well. Canadian beer, of course!

3. MAPLE BACON POUTINE

Developed by Chef Charlene Rowland at Wayne Gretzky’s restaurant in Toronto, this Maple Bacon Poutine variation adds not only bacon, but also bourbon and maple syrup to the gravy (plus a hint of cayenne pepper for a kick).

4. OVEN-FRY POUTINE WITH MUSHROOM GRAVY

Classic poutine is for those who don't worry about their fat, salt, or calorie consumption, or who see it as a rare treat. But if you're looking for all the satisfaction in a healthier package, EatingWell magazine offers a recipe for Oven-Fry Poutine with Mushroom Gravy, which skips the deep-frying and uses lower-sodium ingredients.

5. CHEESY AVOCADO BACON POUTINE

You can give your homemade poutine some California flair with avocados. Gaby Dalkin at What's Gaby Cooking lays out a recipe for Cheesy Avocado Bacon Poutine that tops the fries and cheese with bacon, onions, and tomatillo avocado salsa.

6. SWEET POTATO POUTINE

Sweet potato fans will want to try using oven-baked tubers for chef Marc Matsumoto's Sweet Potato Poutine. The sweet potatoes give a nice balance to the other salty ingredients and make for a great use of fall farmers' market finds.

7. VEGETARIAN POUTINE

Heather Hands at Flourishing Foodie made a Vegetarian Poutine that differs from the basic recipe only in that the gravy is made of vegetable stock, and the potatoes are baked with olive oil, so are a little healthier than the deep-fried version.

8. GREEK-STYLE POUTINE

Greek-Style Poutine contains the requisite fries, gravy, and cheese, but this time, the cheese is Greek Kasseri cheese (a sheep's milk cheese), and it also contains Kalamata olives and two kinds of sausage.

9. DUCK POUTINE

As served by Edible Canada Bistro, this recipe for Quebec Duck Poutine has gravy made with broth stewed from duck bones, plus a couple of eggs sunny-side-up added on top for good measure.

10. POUTINE PIZZA

Using poutine as a pizza topping is fusion dining at its finest. You can make it a homestyle treat with roast beef and mozzarella with this Poutine Pizza recipe from Food.com, or you can cut the overall prep and bake time in half—Spoon University, which specializes in quick and simple recipes for college students, offers Jessica Chiarello's quick-and-easy method for making poutine pizza.

11. DESSERT POUTINE

Relax, this is nothing like classic poutine; it only looks like it. Ricardo Cuisine's Dessert Poutine is made of churros (fries) with marshmallows (cheese curds) drizzled with caramel sauce (gravy). Though, maybe it does resemble classic poutine in one regard: the calorie count!

arrow
History
The Secret World War II History Hidden in London's Fences

In South London, the remains of the UK’s World War II history are visible in an unlikely place—one that you might pass by regularly and never take a second look at. In a significant number of housing estates, the fences around the perimeter are actually upcycled medical stretchers from the war, as the design podcast 99% Invisible reports.

During the Blitz of 1940 and 1941, the UK’s Air Raid Precautions department worked to protect civilians from the bombings. The organization built 60,000 steel stretchers to carry injured people during attacks. The metal structures were designed to be easy to disinfect in case of a gas attack, but that design ended up making them perfect for reuse after the war.

Many London housing developments at the time had to remove their fences so that the metal could be used in the war effort, and once the war was over, they were looking to replace them. The London County Council came up with a solution that would benefit everyone: They repurposed the excess stretchers that the city no longer needed into residential railings.

You can tell a stretcher railing from a regular fence because of the curves in the poles at the top and bottom of the fence. They’re hand-holds, designed to make it easier to carry it.

Unfortunately, decades of being exposed to the elements have left some of these historic artifacts in poor shape, and some housing estates have removed them due to high levels of degradation. The Stretcher Railing Society is currently working to preserve these heritage pieces of London infrastructure.

As of right now, though, there are plenty of stretchers you can still find on the streets. If you're in the London area, this handy Google map shows where you can find the historic fencing.

[h/t 99% Invisible]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
holidays
Custom-Design the Ugly Christmas Sweater of Your Dreams (or Nightmares)
iStock
iStock

For those of you aspiring to be the worst dressed person at your family's holiday dinner, UglyChristmasSweater.com sells—you guessed it—ugly Christmas sweaters to seasonal revelers possessing a sense of irony. But the Michigan-based online retailer has elevated kitsch to new heights by offering a create-your-own-sweater tool on its website.

Simply visit the site's homepage, and click on the Sweater Customizer link. There, you'll be provided with a basic sweater template, which you can decorate with festive snowflakes, reindeer, and other designs in five different colors. If you're feeling really creative, you can even upload photos, logos, hand-drawn pictures, and/or text. After you approve and purchase a mock-up of the final design, you can purchase the final result (prices start at under $70). But you'd better act quickly: due to high demand, orders will take about two weeks plus shipping time to arrive.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios