Courtesy of Forever Yours, Agnes
Courtesy of Forever Yours, Agnes

Designer Turns Her Grandparents' World War II-Era Love Letters Into Jewelry

Courtesy of Forever Yours, Agnes
Courtesy of Forever Yours, Agnes

Instead of safekeeping her grandparents’ old love letters in a ribbon-tied shoebox, Meghan Coomes turns them into heirloom accessories. As TODAY reports, the designer’s jewelry line, called "Forever Yours, Agnes," features glass baubles containing fragments of the couple’s World War II-era missives.

The line is named after—and inspired by—Coomes’s grandmother, Agnes. Seven years ago, the designer was working in the TV industry, which required constant travel. Coomes missed her family, so Grandma Agnes gave her an old letter she had written to her high school sweetheart, a soldier named Thomas, during the 1940s.

Agnes and Thomas eventually married, but before that, they were separated for three years as Thomas fought abroad. During this time, the couple exchanged thousands of letters; they wrote to each other every day, and even used secret codes to share Thomas’s locations.

Coomes decided to immortalize her grandparents' romance by turning the letter into a bracelet for herself, and into a ring for her grandmother. These projects became the basis of an entire jewelry line, featuring both her grandparents’ words and the letters of clients requesting a custom memento. Each item of jewelry contains a word or excerpt from a letter; some also feature metal wire, colored glass, and/or stones.

Both Grandma Agnes and Grandpa Thomas have passed away, but their words live on, thanks in part to Coomes. View some of the designer’s romantic creations below, or visit her website for more information.

All photos courtesy of Forever Yours, Agnes

[h/t TODAY]

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Dominique Faget, AFP/Getty Images
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David Lynch's Amazon T-Shirt Shop is as Surreal as His Movies
Dominique Faget, AFP/Getty Images
Dominique Faget, AFP/Getty Images

David Lynch, the celebrated director behind baffling-but-brilliant films like Eraserhead, Blue Velvet, Mulholland Drive, and Twin Peaks, is now selling his equally surreal T-shirts on Amazon.

As IndieWire reports, each shirt bears an image of one of Lynch’s paintings or photographs with an accompanying title. Some of his designs are more straightforward (the shirts labeled “House” and “Whale” feature, respectively, drawings of a house and a whale), while others are obscure (the shirt called “Chicken Head Tears” features a disturbing sculpture of a semi-human face).

This isn’t the first time Lynch has ventured into pursuits outside of filmmaking. Previously, he has sold coffee, designed furniture, produced music, hosted daily weather reports, and published a book about his experience with transcendental meditation. Art, in fact, falls a little closer to Lynch’s roots; the filmmaker trained for years at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts before making his mark in Hollywood.

Lynch’s Amazon store currently sells 57 T-shirts, ranging in size from small to triple XL, all for $26 each. As for our own feelings on the collection, we think they’re best reflected by this T-shirt named “Honestly, I’m Sort of Confused.”

Check out some of our favorites below:

T-shirt that says "Honestly, I'm Sort of Confused"
"Honestly, I'm Sort of Confused"

Buy it on Amazon

T-shirt with a drawing of a sleeping bird on it
"Sleeping Bird"

Buy it on Amazon

T-shirt that says Peace on Earth over and over again. The caption is pretty on the nose.
"Peace on Earth"

Buy it on Amazon

T-shirt with an image of a screaming face made out of turkey with ants in its mouth
"Turkey Cheese Head"

Buy it on Amazon

T-shirt with an odd sculpted clay face asking if you know who it is. You get the idea.
"I Was Wondering If You Know Who I Am?"

Buy it on Amazon

T-shirt with an image of a sculpted head that is not a chicken. It is blue, though.
"Chicken Head Blue"

Buy it on Amazon

T-shirt with a drawing of a lobster on it. Below the drawing, the lobster is labeled with the word lobster. Shocking, I know.
"Lobster"

Buy it on Amazon

T-shirt with an abstract drawing of what is by David Lynch's account, at least, a cowboy
"Cowboy"

Buy it on Amazon

[h/t IndieWire]

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Meet the Feather Artisans Who Adorn Paris's Cabaret Dancers
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iStock

You can't have cabaret without the feathers. In Paris, one business has been making the plumed and bedazzled costumes for Moulin Rouge and other music halls since 1929. Maison Février has adorned the likes of Josephine Baker and French ballet dancer Zizi Jeanmaire, painstakingly attaching hundreds of feathers to headdresses, skirts, and other costume elements by hand. They use only feathers from birds specially bred—and not killed—for their colorful feathers. The results, as shown in the Great Big Story video below, are a delight to behold.

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