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8 Heartwarming Animal Retirement Homes

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Among the many animals who need homes are those that are considered "unadoptable" due to old age, illness, or disability. While many would-be pet parents looking for a long-term companion may pass them by, other folks relish the opportunity to care for these animals in need. Those are the founders, volunteers, and donors of specialized shelters that offer a home for the rest of these pets' lives. We highlighted a few of them in an earlier post; here are eight more animal retirement homes you should know about.

1. TABBY'S PLACE // RINGOES, NEW JERSEY

In 1999, upon learning that his beloved 15-year-old cat Tabby had terminal cancer, Jonathan Rosenberg decided to quit his day job and create Tabby's Place, a cat sanctuary in honor of his beloved pet. Currently, the Ringoes, New Jersey-based organization operates out of a single building with room for up to 95 cats. Rosenberg's long-term goal is to erect two more buildings on the sanctuary's eight-acre property—creating enough space to provide forever homes for up to 400 cats that are elderly, disabled, chronically or terminally ill, or in danger of being euthanized at another shelter. A staff of volunteers cares for the cats, some of which are available for adoption.

2. RYERSS FARM FOR AGED EQUINES // POTTSTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA

Ryerss Farm for Aged Equines in Pottstown, Pennsylvania, cares for aged, abused, and injured horses. Some are rescued from abusive situations, while others are given over after they reach age 20. However, there is a waiting list for horses that are not in emergency situations. The farm is open for public tours, and also offers internships, volunteer opportunities, and lessons in horse care and horsemanship. To learn more, you can watch this video about Ryerss Farm.

3. WOLFGANG 2242 // DENVER, COLORADO

Wolfgang2242 is not a charitable organization, but the Instagram account of Steve Greig, a Denver, Colorado man who opened his home to elderly animals and who promotes senior dog adoption. He has nine elderly dogs in his home, plus a pig, a rabbit, a chicken, and other animals who deserve love during their golden years. More than 600,000 Instagram followers love Wolfgang2242, too.

4. KINDRED SPIRITS ANIMAL SANCTUARY // SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO

Kindred Spirits Animal Sanctuary/Facebook

Kindred Spirits Animal Sanctuary in Santa Fe, New Mexico, is a hospice for senior dogs, horses, and poultry. They're currently home to 20 dogs, three horses, and a variety of poultry, from the chickens Fred and Ethel to a peacock named Verdito. The sanctuary offers classes on all aspects of senior pet care.

5. VALLEY OF THE KINGS SANCTUARY AND RETREAT // SHARON, WISCONSIN

Valley of the Kings Sanctuary and Retreat/Facebook

Valley of the Kings Sanctuary and Retreat in Sharon, Wisconsin takes in abused, abandoned, or elderly exotic animals such as lions, tigers, bears, and wolves. The sanctuary is not open to the public, but you can become a member or sponsor an animal to help support the organization, which comes with visiting privileges.

6. OLD FRIENDS SENIOR DOG SANCTUARY // MOUNT JULIET, TENNESSEE

Old Friends Senior Dog Sanctuary in Mount Juliet, Tennessee provides guaranteed loving care to senior dogs for the remainder their lives. In addition to the 50 dogs who call the organization's main facility home, there are 150 more dogs in permanent foster homes in the area. If you live within 100 miles of Nashville, you can become a Forever Foster Home with the shelter's support. (You can read the stories of some of their dogs on Facebook.)

7. HOME FOR LIFE // STILLWATER, MINNESOTA

When a pet has a problem that makes it unadoptable, the alternative is often euthanasia. Home for Life, a nonprofit organization in Stillwater, Minnesota, offers a "third door" solution in its lifetime care facilities. Around 115 dogs and 85 cats live in a compound that consists of multiple buildings. Some are elderly or disabled, others have behavioral problems. The buildings each have multiple rooms and protected outdoor areas, and no cages are used.

8. THE STEVENSON COMPANION ANIMAL LIFE-CARE CENTER // COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS

The Stevenson Companion Animal Life-Care Center at Texas A&M's veterinary school in College Station, Texas is a place where hard-to-place pets can live once their owners are no longer able to care for them. It was endowed in part by Madlin Stevenson in 1993; when Stevenson died in 2000, her seven dogs, four cats, pony, and llama came to live at the sanctuary. Pictured above is Reveille VIII, Texas A&M's mascot from 2008 to 2015. Upon retirement from her position, she went to live at the Stevenson Center, where she is cared for by plenty of loving veterinary students.

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Animals
Why Male Hyenas Have It Worse Than Females
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A life of hunting zebras and raising young on the savanna isn’t half bad for a female hyena. Sadly, the same can’t be said for their male counterparts. As MinuteEarth explains, things take a downturn for the males of the species once they hit adolescence. No female in their pack will mate with them, a behavior scientists believe evolved to avoid inbreeding, so they head off in search of a different group to join. After dealing with vicious hazing from their new clan, they file in at the bottom of the rank and wait for other males above them to die so that they can slowly gain status.

Even after rising through the hierarchy, the most a male hyena can aspire to is being second place to the lowest-ranking female. Thanks to their bulky build and aggressive behavior, female hyenas enjoy a dominant position that’s rare in the animal kingdom.

After watching the video below, head over here for more facts about hyenas.

[h/t MinuteEarth]

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Art
A Beached Whale Sculpture Popped Up on the Banks of Paris's Seine River
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In Paris, dozens of fish varieties live in the Seine River. Now, the Associated Press reports that the famous waterway is home to a beached whale.

Rest assured, eco-warriors: The sperm whale is actually a lifelike sculpture, installed on an embankment next to Notre Dame Cathedral by Belgian artists’ collective Captain Boomer. It’s meant to raise environmental awareness, and evoke "the child in everyone who still is puzzled about what is real and what is not,” collective member Bart Van Peel told the Associated Press.

The 65-foot sculpture has reportedly startled and confused many Parisians, thanks in part to a team of fake scientists deployed to “survey” the whale. One collective member even posted a video on social media, warning Parisians that there “may be others in the water” if they opt to take a dip in the river, The Local reported.

The whale sculpture is only temporary—but as for Captain Boomer, this isn’t their first whale-related stunt. Last summer, the collective installed a similar riverside artwork in Rennes, France, and they also once strapped a large-scale whale sculpture to the back of a truck and drove it around France.

[h/t Associated Press]

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