Astronaut Records Elusive "Blue Jet" Lightning From Space

During his mission aboard the International Space Station in 2015, Danish astronaut Andreas Mogensen captured a dramatic weather phenomenon that’s rarely seen from Earth. As Mashable reports, his footage below is the clearest look we have at “blue jet” lightning.

Blue jets form when lightning bolts spring from the tops of thunderclouds, shooting 25 to 30 miles up. Even from a vantage point in the Earth’s orbit, the flashes can be difficult to document. Mogensen recorded this video using highly sensitive camera equipment aboard the ISS.

During the 160 seconds of footage taken above the Bay of Bengal, 245 blue flashes of electricity were captured. The film provides an unprecedented look at a weather phenomenon meteorologists still know little about. The European Space Agency (ESA) is now planning to mount a camera outside their Columbus laboratory aboard the ISS that will monitor thunderstorms around the clock. In addition to giving us more data about blue jets, future footage could provide valuable information about other types of upper-atmospheric lightning like red sprites, pixies, and elves.

[h/t Mashable]

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Weather Watch
Why Does the Sky Look Green Before a Tornado?
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A common bit of folklore from tornado-prone parts of the U.S. says that when the skies start taking on an emerald hue, it's time to run inside. But why do tornadoes tend to spawn green skies in the first place? As SciShow's Michael Aranda explains, the answer has to do with the way water droplets reflect the colors of the light spectrum.

During the day, the sky is usually blue because the shorter, bluer end of the light spectrum bounces off air molecules better than than redder, longer-wavelength light. Conditions change during the sunset (and sunrise), when sunlight has to travel through more air, and when storms are forming, which means there are more water droplets around.

Tornadoes forming later in the day, around sunset, do a great job of reflecting the green part of the light spectrum that's usually hidden in a sunset because of the water droplets in the clouds, which bounce green light into our eyes. But that doesn't necessarily mean a twister is coming—it could just mean a lot of rain is in the forecast. Either way, heading inside is probably a good idea.

For the full details on how water and light conspire to turn the sky green before a storm, check out the SciShow video below.

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Weather Watch
New Contest Will Give Kids the Chance to Become Weather Channel Meteorologists for a Day
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Not every kid dreams of being an on-air meteorologist, but for young ‘uns obsessed with storm forecasts and local weather reports, a new contest presents a unique opportunity to live out their dreams. The Mini Meteorologist Contest, sponsored by Lands’ End, will give four kids a chance to present a weather report on The Weather Channel this summer.

The nationwide contest is open to future meteorologists in the U.S. and Canada ages 6 to 16. To enter, they just have to write an essay between 50 and 500 words long on why they love learning about science and weather and why they’d like to be a meteorologist for a day. Four winners will receive a trip for them and their parents to The Weather Channel’s headquarters in Atlanta. They’ll have the opportunity to report the weather for the show on July 12, which happens to be National Summer Learning Day.

The essays will be judged based in equal parts on creativity, grammar, and the entrant’s love of meteorology. The only rules for the essays are that they can’t mention any products or brands other than Lands’ End or The Weather Channel (so no essays about how L.L. Bean inspired your love of cloud formations, kids) and has to be the child’s original work. Kids who are chosen as semi-finalists will have their on-air presentation skills judged in a Skype interview.

Should they win, they’ll get an inclusive trip to Atlanta with media training, a tour of The Weather Channel headquarters, and a $500 Lands’ End gift card to get just the right weather-reporting wardrobe.

The deadline for entering is May 21. Essays can be submitted here.

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