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Rembrandt via The Met Museum // CC0 1.0

Met Museum Makes 375,000 Images Freely Available Online

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Rembrandt via The Met Museum // CC0 1.0

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City has made around 375,000 images of public-domain artworks from its collections freely available online, The New York Times reports. Members of the public can download, edit, and distribute high-resolution photos from the Met’s website, with no copyright restrictions whatsoever.

The initiative—a part of the Met’s new open access policyincludes partnerships with Creative Commons, Wikimedia, Artstor, Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), Art Resource, and Pinterest in order to improve access to the museum's images. For example, web users can now find images, save, tag, or "pin” images of artworks on Creative Commons, as Hyperallergic reports. The Met has also named a new “Wikipedian in Residence,” Richard Knipel, who’s responsible for uploading pictures into Wikimedia Commons, documenting their metadata, and creating new articles on various artworks or topics.

The images feature 200,000 artworks, including famous paintings like Emanuel Leutze’s Washington Crossing the Delaware and El Greco’s The Vision of Saint John. They comprise a large portion of the Met’s collections, although many other of the institution's public domain works—think engravings, posters, and prints—have yet to be digitized. (Another 65,000 Met artworks have been digitized, but they don’t fall under public domain.)

“Our comprehensive and diverse museum collection spans 5000 years of world culture,” Met director Thomas P. Campbell said in a statement quoted by Artnet. “Our core mission is to be open and accessible for all who wish to study and enjoy the works of art in our care. Increasing access to the museum’s collection and scholarship serves the interests and needs of our 21st-century audiences by offering new resources for creativity, knowledge, and ideas.”

As Hyperallergic points out, the Met’s website has contained hundreds of thousands of publicly accessible images since 2014, but visitors were only able to download them for free if they were intended for non-commercial or scholarly use. Now, all of those images have CC0 1.0 or Creative Commons Zero licenses. You can browse the newly available works by going to the Met's Collection page and selecting the "Public Domain Artworks" filter on the left.

Digitized images of the Met's collections will be rolled out gradually, AFP Relax News reports.

[h/t The New York Times]

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WASProject via Flickr
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The World’s First 3D-Printed Opera Set Is Coming to Rome
Original image
WASProject via Flickr

In October, the Opera Theater in Rome will become the first theater to play host to a 3D-printed set in one of its operas. The theater’s performance of the 19th-century opera Fra Diavolo by French composer Daniel Auber, opening on October 8, will feature set pieces printed by the Italian 3D-printing company WASP, as TREND HUNTER reports.

Set designers have been using 3D printers to make small-scale set models for years, but WASP says this seems to be the first full 3D-printed set. (The company is also building a 3D-printed town elsewhere in Italy, to give you a sense of its ambitions for its technology.)

Designers stand around a white 3D-printed model of a theater set featuring warped buildings.
WASP

The Fra Diavolo set consists of what looks like two warped historic buildings, which WASP likens to a Dalí painting. These buildings are made of 223 smaller pieces. It took five printers working full-time for three months to complete the job. The pieces were sent to Rome in mid-July in preparation for the opera.

Recently, 3D printing is taking over everything from housing construction to breakfast. If you can make an office building with a printer, why not a theater set? (Though it should be noted that the labor unions that represent scenic artists might disagree.)

[h/t TREND HUNTER]

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Japanese Artist Yayoi Kusama to Launch Her Own Museum in Tokyo

Still haven’t scored tickets to see Yayoi Kusama’s world-famous “Infinity Mirrors” exhibition? The touring retrospective ends at the Cleveland Museum of Art in October 2018, but art fans who are planning a trip to Japan can also enjoy Kusama's dizzying, colorful aesthetic by visiting a brand-new museum in Tokyo.

As The New York Times reports, Kusama has announced that she's opening her own art museum in the city’s Shinjuku neighborhood. Slated to open on October 1, 2017, it’s dedicated to the artist’s life and work, and includes a reading room, a floor with installation works—including her “infinity rooms”—and two annual rotating exhibitions. The inaugural exhibition, “Creation Is a Solitary Pursuit, Love Is What Brings You Closer to Art,” will display works from Kusama’s painting series "My Eternal Soul.”

Kusama is famously enigmatic, so it shouldn’t come as a surprise that news broke just recently that she was planning to launch a museum. The five-floor building was completed in 2014, according to artnet News, but Kusama wanted to keep plans under wraps “as a surprise for her fans,” a gallery spokesperson said.

Museum tickets cost around $9, and will go on sale on August 28, 2017. The museum will be closed Monday through Wednesday and visits are limited to 90 minutes, so plan your schedule accordingly.

[h/t The New York Times]

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