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CableTV.com

The Most Popular Rom-Com in Each State

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CableTV.com

For years, movie critics have been declaring the romantic comedy “dead," but that hasn’t stopped us from streaming Pretty in Pink again and again. CableTV.com dove into Google Trends across the country to figure out which rom-coms are most popular in each state, at least according to Internet searches. (See a bigger version of the graphic here.)

For most states, the answer is Pretty in Pink. The 1986 John Hughes movie is still a hit more than 30 years later, clinching the top search result in 14 different states. South Carolina and South Dakota are very interested in the surprise-pregnancy humor of 2007's Knocked Up. But in general, there aren’t a lot of other shared searches between states. People tend to search for movies set in that state—Alabama, unsurprisingly, loves to search for Sweet Home Alabama (2002), while Alaskans search for The Proposal (2009), and Washingtonians search for Sleepless in Seattle (1993).

Since these are just Google Trends, people might not be watching the movies they are searching for. Perhaps Hawaiians just really want to know where 50 First Dates was filmed. But the sheer volume of Pretty in Pink searches can pretty much guarantee that plenty of people do end up watching Andie and Duckie go to the prom.

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Theo Rindos
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Design
Graphic Designer Visualizes America's Major Rivers as Subway Routes
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Theo Rindos

Mark Twain spent his early years navigating America's winding waterways, but the steamboat pilot-turned-author was also a fan of modern transportation: He was one of the first passengers to ride the London Underground's longest tube line—the Central Line—when it first opened in 1900. Needless to say, Twain would probably be a fan of the map below, which visualizes U.S. rivers as subway lines.

A map depicting U.S. rivers as subway routes, by graphic designer Theo Rindos
Theo Rindos
 
 
A map depicting U.S. rivers as subway routes, by graphic designer Theo Rindos
Theo Rindos

Created by graphic designer Theo Rindos (and spotted by CityLab), the map is inspired by Harry Beck's original London Tube map from the 1930s. It's based on data culled from the U.S. Geological Survey, Google Maps, and Wikipedia.

"I have always been fascinated by transit maps and river systems, and I thought, 'Why not put them together?'" Rindos tells Mental Floss. Beck's design style "has been kind of a staple for many city transit systems because it's so easy to understand and is so beautiful. The rivers of the United States are complex, and I wanted to see if I could achieve a similar outcome."

The source of each river is denoted with a solid-colored circle. White circles indicate where these waterways converge and split, and neighboring cities and towns are marked as "stations." That said, the map doesn't feature every single U.S. river: It includes ones important to the transportation and shipping sectors, but for aesthetic reasons, Rindos opted to leave out awkwardly shaped rivers and turned smaller ones into bus routes.

You can view a mock-up of Rindos' map below (hard copies aren’t ready for sale quite yet), or visit the designer's website to learn more about his work.

[h/t CityLab]

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Jeff Topping/Getty Images
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geography
Which Americans Have The Longest Commutes? Take a Look
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Jeff Topping/Getty Images

A long commute affects more than just whether or not you’ll get to work on time. Spending hours getting to and from the office (especially by car) can make you feel worse about your job and affect your health. Which U.S. areas have the most soul-crushing commutes? Chase Sawyer, a statistician who runs the visualization site Overflow Data, recently mapped out the answer, as CityLab reports.

Using data from the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey collected between 2011 and 2015, Sawyer created an interactive graphic that examines average commute time across the U.S. Unsurprisingly, commute times near New York City and Washington, D.C. are some of the longest. (Ditto for the Denver area.) Commute times in much of the Midwest are rather short, and in Alaska, they're virtually nonexistent.

You can play with the interactive version of the graphic on the Overflow Data site.

The data, organized by county, shows that Pike County, Pennsylvania (which is part of the New York-Newark-Jersey City metropolitan area) technically has the longest average commute time in the nation, clocking in at 44 minutes. Most of the other super-long commutes are taken by New York City workers, including in the Bronx and Brooklyn, where the average commute times are all more than 40 minutes long. Meanwhile, in some Alaskan counties, average commutes can be as short as five minutes long (meaning many people likely live and work in the same location).

Bear in mind that not every commute looks the same, and how you get to work is as important as how long it takes you. Workers in Brooklyn and the Bronx might be spending an hour on the train each way, but research has shown that workers who take public transit are much happier than those who drive. So a 40-minute commute in a metropolitan area on a train might be nowhere near as awful as a gridlocked commute in a suburban area would be. We're looking at you, Southern California.

[h/t CityLab]

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