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13 Rules Regarding Proper Email Etiquette from Around the World

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Last month, France enacted a new labor law that gives anyone who works at a company with 50 or more employees the "right to disconnect" from their email. That means that employers actually have to actively enact policies discouraging people from sending or responding to messages outside of typical business hours.

While that ruling may sound like a utopian pipe dream to the many Americans for whom work communication infiltrates early mornings, late nights, and even weekends, it wasn’t such a big leap for the French, who have long valued work-life balance.

Generally, email culture varies widely around the world, from the response times you can expect to the phrasing and tone used. So, if you plan to communicate with colleagues, new clients, or sources from other countries, we've rounded up some examples of email etiquette and other quirks to remember to help ensure smooth communication.

1. IN INDIA OR OTHER "HIGH-CONTEXT" CULTURES LIKE JAPAN OR CHINA, PEOPLE ARE LESS LIKELY TO SAY "NO."

You won’t find many direct declines peppering emails from Indians. People will throw out a "maybe" or "yes, but" to imply "no" without actually saying it. This allows both parties to "save face," an important cultural concept where both parties avoid an embarrassment that could come from a refusal. For example, if you ask an India-based colleague to Skype at what would be 7 p.m. their time, they may reply with "yes" but then mention that they will push back their dinner plans as a way to signal that the time isn’t actually convenient—that's your cue to suggest an earlier time.

2. IF AN INDIAN WRITER HAS SOME "DOUBTS," FEAR NOT.

When you send over a suggestion or a business plan and an Indian colleague responds that they have some "doubts" on the issue, they could very well just mean that they have questions. There are Hindi and Tamil words that effectively mean both, so someone may inadvertently write the former, which comes across as much more negative, when they really mean the latter.

3. BE CAREFUL HOW YOU ADDRESS SOMEONE WHO EMAILS FROM CHINA.

In China, people state their names with their surname first, followed by their given name. It would be rude to call someone only by his or her last name, so a Westerner would have to make sure to switch the order before adding a title (Mr., Ms, etc). However, Chinese people will sometimes preemptively use the Western format when emailing Western companies, which would lead to confusion if the recipient tries to swap the names. When in doubt about someone’s name, ask.

4. AND IN CHINA, EVEN BUSINESS EMAILS MAY BE "CUTE."

While many Americans see emoticons as unprofessional, the Chinese generally don’t. Porter Erisman, who worked at the Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba for many years and wrote the book Alibaba’s World about his experience, says that even senior managers would include "all sorts of cute smiley faces and animations" in their emails. "At first it seemed a little strange to me, but by the time I left the company, even I was peppering my internal emails with little emoticons everywhere," he tells mental_floss. "It got to the point that when new Western colleagues would enter the company, I would encourage them to 'cutify' their emails a little bit to come across more human and friendly."

5. KOREANS TYPICALLY BEGIN AN EMAIL WITH A GENERAL OBSERVATION AS A FORM OF POLITENESS.

An email from a Korean associate might begin with what seems like a completely unrelated message. For example, a Korean-style email might go something like, "Dear Ms. Smith. This is Joe Schmo. The rainy season in Korea is now upon us. I hope you have a good umbrella. I’m contacting you because ... " as one Reddit user explains it.

6. KOREANS WILL ALSO SOMETIMES END AN EMAIL WITH "THE END."

It is routine for a Korean to conclude an email with the equivalent of "the end" without it meaning that communication should stop, according to Steven Bammel, a consultant on Korean business practices. Koreans may also close an email with "work hard" or "suffer a lot," which are as much a standard, conversational closer as "take it easy" might be for an American (but it shows the Korean emphasis on the importance of hard work and competitiveness).

7. GERMANS KEEP IT FORMAL.

In Germany, it's customary to begin emails with a greeting that is equivalent to "Dear Sir / Madam" even within the same office. Other little quirks: Germans start the sentence after their greeting with a lowercase letter and frequently don't use a comma between their sign-offs and signature.

8. YOU SHOULD NEVER ADDRESS A RUSSIAN BY JUST THEIR FIRST NAME UNLESS EXPLICITLY INVITED TO DO SO.

The formality is seen as a necessary sign of respect. You should also expect any business negotiation to move very slowly, particularly because many Russians see compromise as a sign of weakness.

9. THE JAPANESE SKEW APOLOGETIC WHEN MAKING REQUESTS.

If you're asking a Japanese collaborator a question or for a favor, you should make sure to thoroughly acknowledge the effort it will require for them to help you and apologize accordingly. For example, use phrases like, "Sorry to interrupt you while you are busy" or "I'm terribly sorry for the inconvenience, but thank you …"

10. MOST OTHER COUNTRIES WRITE THE DATE IN A WAY THAT WOULD CONFUSE AMERICANS.

In most European and South American countries, as well as Australia and various African and Asian countries, people will use a "day/month/year" format instead of the "month/day/year" format that Americans are used to. While the difference can be easy to spot if someone requests a deadline of "14/4/17," an email referencing "9/4/17" could have you thinking that you have to wait several months for something to be decided or delivered. When in doubt, always clarify!

11. ITALIANS MAY CALL YOU "DOTTORE," REGARDLESS OF WHETHER OR NOT YOU HAVE A MEDICAL DEGREE.

The word "dottore" or "medico" can be used to refer to a doctor in Italian, but the former takes on a different meaning when used in correspondence. Italians will use "Dottore" or "Dottoressa" as a respectful way to address people. "To deserve the title of 'Dottore,' you need only to have a university education—nothing to do with a degree in medicine!" Italian businesswoman Daniela Roggero, who works in global training and HR development, explains to mental_floss.

She also advises that you should be open to including details about your life in an email with Italian colleagues.

"We like to share personal situations, feelings, references to our family and so on even in work communication," Roggero says. “Also we love to start (mostly informal) emails with something funny, like 'You thought I had disappeared but here I am again!' or things like that."

12. PAY ATTENTION TO WHETHER YOU'RE USING ACTIVE OR PASSIVE VOICE WHEN EMAILING ASSOCIATES IN THE PHILIPPINES.

Filipinos will often show respect to someone of an equal or superior business rank by speaking or writing in the passive voice, as in "The rest of the information will be sent tomorrow" versus "I will send you the rest of the information tomorrow." Generally, people only use the active voice when communicating with those of lower rank. You can score points by adhering to the appropriate structure.

13. DO YOUR RESEARCH TO KNOW WHEN TO EXPECT A RESPONSE.

While Americans generally expect a fast turn-around time when communicating through email, other cultures have a much longer acceptable window for responses. Get used to several days or a week between messages when you're operating on Brazilian time, for example.

Similarly, people in most countries don't utilize "out of office" automated responses as much as Americans do, since immediate responses aren't expected. If you're doing a lot of international communicating and set a vacation transponder for the Monday and Friday that you're taking off for a long weekend, you will likely come across as a workaholic.

All images via iStock.

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Live Smarter
The Only Way to Answer ‘What Is Your Greatest Weakness?’ In a Job Interview
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Thanks in part to the influence of Silicon Valley and its focus on the psychological probing of job applicants, interview questions have been steadily getting more and more abstract. As part of the interview process, today's job seekers might be asked to describe a vending machine to someone who’s never seen one before, or plan a fantasy date with a famous historical figure.

Even if the company you’re approaching isn’t fully on board with prodding your brain, at some point you may still come up against one of the most common queries applicants face: "What is your greatest weakness?"

"Some 'experts' will tell you to try and turn a strength into a 'weakness,' to make yourself look good," writes Inc. contributor Justin Bariso. "That advice is garbage."

"Think about it," Bariso continues. "Interviewers are asking the same question to countless candidates. Just try and guess how many times they hear the answers 'being a perfectionist' or 'working too much.' (Hint: way too often.)"

While responding that you work too hard might seem like a reliable method of moving the conversation along, there’s a better way. And it involves being sincere.

"The fact is, it's not easy to identify one's own weaknesses," Bariso writes. "Doing so takes intense self-reflection, critical thinking, and the ability to accept negative feedback—qualities that have gone severely missing in a world that promotes instant gratification and demands quick (often thoughtless) replies to serious issues."

Bariso believes the question is an effective way to reveal an applicant’s self-awareness, which is why companies often use it in their vetting process. By being self-aware, people (and employees) can correct behavior that might be affecting job performance. So the key is to give this question some actual thought before it’s ever posed to you.

What is your actual greatest weakness? It could be that, in a desire to please everyone, you wind up making decisions based on the urge to avoid disappointing others. That’s a weakness that sounds authentic.

Pondering the question also has another benefit: It prompts you to think of areas in your life that could use some course-correcting. Even if you don’t land that job—or even if the question is never posed to you—you’ve still made time for self-reflection. The result could mean a more confident and capable presence for that next interview.

[h/t Inc.]

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Words
This Is the Most Commonly Misspelled Word on Job Resumes
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by Reader's Digest Editors

Your resume is your first chance to make a good impression with hiring managers. One misspelled word might not seem like a huge deal, but it can mean the difference between looking competent and appearing lazy. A 2014 Accountemps survey of 300 senior managers found that 63 percent of employers would reject a job candidate who had just one or two typos on their resume.

Most misspellings on resumes slip through the cracks because spellcheck doesn’t catch them. The most common misspelling on resumes is a shockingly simple word—or so you’d think.

Career coach and resume writer Jared Redick of Resume Studio in San Francisco tells Business Insider that the most common misspelling he sees by far is confusing “lead” with “led.” If you’re talking about how you run meetings at your current job, the correct spelling is “lead,” which is in the present tense. If the bullet point is from a former position, use lead’s past tense: led. Yes, “lead” as in the metal can also be pronounced “led,” but most people have no need to discuss chemical elements on their job resumes.

 
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Other spelling mistakes Redick has seen pop up over and over again on resumes is spelling “definitely” as “definately” (which spellcheck thankfully should catch) and adding an e in “judgment” (“judgement” is the British spelling, but “judgment” is preferred in American English).

To avoid the cringe factor of noticing little typos after sending out your application—especially if your misspelling actually is a real word that spellcheck recognizes—always proofread your resume before submitting. Slowly reading it out loud will take just a few minutes, but it could mean the difference between an interview and a rejection.

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