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Kit Kat Sushi Is Coming to Japan

If flavors like wasabi, red pepper, and purple sweet potato are any indication, Japan’s Kit Kat consumers are an adventurous bunch. The brand should have no problem selling these specialty sushi Kit Kats to celebrate the opening of their first street-facing Tokyo shop on February 2.

The treats are modeled after three types of sushi: maguro (tuna), tamago (egg), and uni (sea urchin). Fortunately for customers, the chocolate only looks like seafood. The red "tuna" bar is actually raspberry-flavored, the "egg" Kit Kat is pumpkin, and the "uni" Kit Kat tastes like mascarpone and melon. Instead of sushi rice, the chocolate sits on a pillow of white-chocolate-covered puffed rice. The seaweed you see on the tamago and uni roll is the real thing, so diners should be prepared to mix sweet and savory.

As Kotaku reports, the limited batch of products will be available at the store until February 4.

If you’re hoping to be one of the lucky few to sample these creations, it’ll cost you: A set of sushi sells for 3000 yen, or $26. It’s a good thing it’s fairly easy to make your own dessert sushi at home.

[h/t Kotaku]

Header/banner images: Fieldafar via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 4.0

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Hate Red M&M's? You Need a Candy Color-Sorting Machine
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You don’t have to be a demanding rock star to live a life without brown M&M's or purple Skittles—all you need is some engineering know-how and a little bit of free time.

Mechanical engineering student Willem Pennings created a machine that can take small pieces of candy—like M&M's, Skittles, Reese’s Pieces, etc.—and sort them by color into individual piles. All Pennings needs to do is pour the candy into the top funnel; from there, the machine separates the candy—around two pieces per second—and dispenses all of it into smaller bowls at the bottom designated for each variety.

The color identification is performed with an RGB sensor that takes “optical measurements” of candy pieces of equal dimensions. There are limitations, though, as Pennings revealed in a Reddit Q&A: “I wouldn't be able to use this machine for peanut M&M's, since the sizes vary so much.”

The entire building process lasted from May through December 2016, and included the actual conceptualization, 3D printing (which was outsourced), and construction. The entire project was detailed on Pennings’s website and Reddit's DIY page.

With all of the motors, circuitry, and hardware that went into it, Pennings’s machine is likely too ambitious of a task for the average candy aficionado. So until a machine like this hits the open market, you're probably stuck buying bags of single-colored M&M’s in bulk online or sorting all of the candy out yourself the old fashioned way.

To see Pennings’s machine in action, check out the video below:

[h/t Refinery 29]

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See How Candy Canes Are Made
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According to legend, a 17th-century German choirmaster bent sugar sticks into shepherd’s crooks and gave them to children acting in his Nativity pageant as a treat for good behavior. Lo and behold, the world’s first candy canes were born.

Over the years, manufacturers have perfected their own methods of making the holiday treat. In the below video from Lofty Pursuits, a Tallahassee, Florida-based purveyor of hard candies, you can watch how the expert team of candy-makers turn seemingly everyday ingredients like sugar, water, and corn syrup into a sticky mixture. Gradually, the pliable concoction is folded, stretched, rolled, cut, and bent into candy canes—a mesmerizing visual process for anyone who’s ever sucked on one of the sugary confections and suspected it came from somewhere other than Santa’s workshop.

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