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It’s Official: Ben & Jerry’s Bourbon Ice Cream Is Coming to Stores

Since rumors of a new bourbon Ben & Jerry’s flavor started swirling earlier this month, ice cream fanatics have been left wondering when and if such a glorious concoction might be made available. Well, they don’t have to wonder any longer: As TIME reports, Ben & Jerry’s has officially confirmed Urban Bourbon as part of their lineup with a release date set for mid-February.

The product is packed with decadent components like burnt caramel ice cream, almonds, and fudge flakes. But it’s the bourbon caramel swirls that have fans of fine liquor buzzing. Though this isn’t the first time Ben & Jerry’s has experimented with putting booze—or even bourbon—in its ice cream, the mix of so many crowd-pleasing ingredients in one carton sets it up to become an instant classic.

 

Ben & Jerry’s also announced two more additions to their family of ice cream: Oat of This Swirled, an oatmeal cookie flavor, and Truffle Kerfuffle, a vanilla ice cream with salted chocolate ganache and nuts. The two varieties will debut alongside Urban Bourbon next month.

[h/t TIME]

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The Brain Chemistry Behind Your Caffeine Boost
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Whether it’s consumed as coffee, candy, or toothpaste, caffeine is the world’s most popular drug. If you’ve ever wondered how a shot of espresso can make your groggy head feel alert and ready for the day, TED-Ed has the answer.

Caffeine works by hijacking receptors in the brain. The stimulant is nearly the same size and shape as adenosine, an inhibitory neurotransmitter that slows down neural activity. Adenosine builds up as the day goes on, making us feel more tired as the day progresses. When caffeine enters your system, it falls into the receptors meant to catch adenosine, thus keeping you from feeling as sleepy as you would otherwise. The blocked adenosine receptors also leave room for the mood-boosting compound dopamine to settle into its receptors. Those increased dopamine levels lead to the boost in energy and mood you feel after finishing your morning coffee.

For a closer look at how this process works, check out the video below.

[h/t TED-Ed]

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LaCroix
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How Do You Pronounce 'LaCroix'?
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LaCroix

For decades, Perrier was the sparkling water of choice for beverage enthusiasts. More recently, an upstart named LaCroix has captured the attention of millennials who don’t much care for Perrier’s elitist stature. Sold in aluminum cans rather than glass bottles and featuring festive, Florida-tinged designs (the parent company, National Beverage, is based in Fort Lauderdale), LaCroix has managed to become a market leader in bubbly water. National Beverage claims it’s the number one brand.

While consumers may enjoy the taste, requesting a LaCroix can be slightly problematic if you don’t know how to pronounce the name. Like the acai berry and quinoa before it, the name can be troublesome to the tongue.

The company instructs that the proper pronunciation is “Lah-croy,” rhyming with “enjoy.”

The name comes from the fact that LaCroix was originally developed in Wisconsin back in 1981. The “La” is for the city of La Crosse, and “Croix” from the St. Croix River.

Uttering “La-crux” might get you some judgmental stares among the bubbly water elite. Affecting a French accent and coughing out “la-kwah” might get you pardoned from the table. Stick with “lah croy." If you need a mnemonic device, you can tell yourself it rhymes with “enjoy.” Or you could just order tap water.

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