Screenshot via Orbitz
Screenshot via Orbitz

Map Plots the Fastest Route to America’s Michelin-Starred Restaurants

Screenshot via Orbitz
Screenshot via Orbitz

In 1900, eleven years after Michelin was founded, the tire company released its first city guide as a way to promote travel to its customers. In the spirit of the guide’s origins, Orbitz has published a map plotting the fastest way to visit every Michelin-starred restaurant in the U.S. by car.

America is home to a number of areas with the most Michelin-starred restaurants on Earth—including the San Francisco area, which boasts more than 50 stars spread out across more than 30 establishments, and is where this road trip starts. After knocking out the California spots, drivers take a 2111-mile trip to Chicago, where 26 Michelin-starred eateries await them. After that, there are two culinary destinations left to visit: New York City, which has more stars than any other city in the U.S. (with 77), and Washington D.C., which received its first Michelin guide this year. Even though the restaurants are concentrated in just four states, the sheer number of restaurants on the list means that if you ate at a different one each night, it would take you five months to try them all.

The road trip is 3426 miles in total, with the optimal distance calculated by road trip wizard Randy Olson (you may be familiar with his epic National Park route or his “Where’s Waldo?” search algorithm). You can check out an interactive version of the map, complete with each restaurant's name, address, and total number of stars, at Orbitz.com.

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TASCHEN
Everything You Need to Know About Food in One Book
TASCHEN
TASCHEN

If you find yourself mixing up nigiri and sashimi at sushi restaurants or don’t know which fruits are in season, then this is the book for you. Food & Drink Infographics, published by TASCHEN, is a colorful and comprehensive guide to all things food and drink.

The book combines tips and tricks with historical context about the ways in which different civilizations illustrated and documented the foods they ate, as well as how humans went from hunter-gatherers to modern-day epicureans. As for the infographics, there’s a helpful graphic explaining the number of servings provided by different cake sizes, a heat index of various chilies, a chart of cheeses, and a guide to Italian cold cuts, among other delectable charts.

The 480-page coffee table book, which can be purchased on Amazon for $56, is written in three languages: English, French, and German. The infographics themselves come from various sources, and the text is provided by Simone Klabin, a New York City-based writer and lecturer on film, art, culture, and children’s media.

Keep scrolling to see a few of the infographics featured in the book.

An infographic about cheese
TASCHEN

An infographic about cakes
Courtesy of TASCHEN

An infographic about fruits in season
Courtesy of TASCHEN

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