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1984 Georgia O’Keeffe portrait by Bruce Weber. Image credit: Bruce Weber and Nan Bush Collection, New York

New Exhibition Highlights the Fashion of Georgia O’Keeffe

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1984 Georgia O’Keeffe portrait by Bruce Weber. Image credit: Bruce Weber and Nan Bush Collection, New York

When discussing Georgia O’Keeffe, it’s impossible to leave out the colorful florals and southwestern imagery that dominated her work, but a new exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum puts some of the focus on the less-explored facets of the painter's life. As The Creators Project reports, "Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern" includes portraits of the artist, and, for the first time in an art show, pieces from her wardrobe.

According to the Brooklyn Museum, O’Keeffe used fashion and posed photographs as tools for molding her public persona. The description page says that the exhibition “confirms and explores her determination to be in charge of how the world understood her identity and artistic values.”

The installation includes pieces from the artist’s early years, her time in New York in the 1920s and '30s, and the period in New Mexico that shaped her signature style. Her stark, self-made clothing can be seen both in person and in the portraits selected for the exhibit. Ansel Adams, Annie Leibovitz, Andy Warhol, and O’Keeffe’s husband, Alfred Stieglitz, are a few of the photographers whose work is on display.

1927 Georgia O'Keeffe portrait by Alfred Stieglitz. Image credit: National Gallery of Art, Washington, Alfred Stieglitz Collection
Suit circa 1960s. Image credit: Gavin Ashworth

Georgia O'Keeffe portrait by Alfred Stieglitz circa 1920–22. Image credit: Gift of The Georgia O’Keeffe Foundation, 2003.01.006. Georgia O’Keeffe Museum

Padded kimono circa 1960s/70s. Image credit: Gavin Ashworth

"Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern" is part of an ongoing program at the Brooklyn Museum titled "A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism." Focusing on the artist’s fashion decisions may seem like an odd move for a feminist art show, but her clothing choices helped O’Keeffe communicate power in a male-dominated field. Her androgynous style made a bold statement in the early 20th century, and modern designers like Calvin Klein, Victoria Beckham, and Céline continue to cite the icon as inspiration today. The exhibition opens March 3 and runs until July 23; discounted tickets go on sale January 24.

[h/t The Creators Project]

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Ape Meets Girl
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Pop Culture
Epic Gremlins Poster Contains More Than 80 References to Classic Movies
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Ape Meets Girl

It’s easy to see why Gremlins (1984) appeals to movie nerds. Executive produced by Steven Spielberg and written by Chris Columbus, the film has horror, humor, and awesome 1980s special effects that strike a balance between campy and creepy. Perhaps it’s the movie’s status as a pop culture treasure that inspired artist Kevin Wilson to make it the center of his epic hidden-image puzzle of movie references.

According to io9, Wilson, who works under the pseudonym Ape Meets Girl, has hidden 84 nods to different movies in this Gremlins poster. The scene is taken from the movie’s opening, when Randall enters a shop in Chinatown looking for a gift for his son and leaves with a mysterious creature. Like in the film, Mr. Wing’s shop in the poster is filled with mysterious artifacts, but look closely and you’ll find some objects that look familiar. Tucked onto the bottom shelf is a Chucky doll from Child’s Play (1988); above Randall’s head is a plank of wood from the Orca ship made famous by Jaws (1975); behind Mr. Wing’s counter, which is draped with a rug from The Shining’s (1980) Overlook Hotel, is the painting of Vigo the Carpathian from Ghostbusters II (1989). The poster was released by the Hero Complex Gallery at New York Comic Con earlier this month.

“Early on, myself and HCG had talked about having a few '80s Easter Eggs, but as we started making a list it got longer and longer,” Wilson told Mental Floss. “It soon expanded from '80s to any prop or McGuffin that would fit the curio shop setting. I had to stop somewhere so I stopped at 84, the year Gremlins was released. Since then I’ve thought of dozens more I wish I’d included.”

The ambitious artwork has already sold out, but fortunately cinema buffs can take as much time as they like scouring the poster from their computers. Once you think you’ve found all the references you can possibly find, you can check out Wilson’s key below to see what you missed (and yes, he already knows No. 1 should be Clash of the Titans [1981], not Jason and the Argonauts [1963]). For more pop culture-inspired art, follow Ape Meets Girl on Facebook and Instagram.

Key for hidden image puzzle.
Ape Meets Girl

[h/t io9]

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Kehinde Wiley Studio, Inc., Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0
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presidents
Barack Obama Taps Kehinde Wiley to Paint His Official Presidential Portrait
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Kehinde Wiley
Kehinde Wiley Studio, Inc., Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0

Kehinde Wiley, an American artist known for his grand portraits of African-American subjects, has painted Michael Jackson, Ice-T, and The Notorious B.I.G. in his work. Now the artist will have the honor of adding Barack Obama to that list. According to the Smithsonian, the former president has selected Wiley to paint his official presidential portrait, which will hang in the National Portrait Gallery.

Wiley’s portraits typically depict black people in powerful poses. Sometimes he models his work after classic paintings, as was the case with "Napoleon Leading the Army Over the Alps.” The subjects are often dressed in hip-hop-style clothing and placed against decorative backdrops.

Portrait by Kehinde Wiley
"Le Roi a la Chasse"
Kehinde Wiley, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 3.0

Smithsonian also announced that Baltimore-based artist Amy Sherald has been chosen by former first lady Michelle Obama to paint her portrait for the gallery. Like Wiley, Sherald uses her work to challenge stereotypes of African-Americans in art.

“The Portrait Gallery is absolutely delighted that Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald have agreed to create the official portraits of our former president and first lady,” Kim Sajet, director of the National Portrait Gallery, said in a press release. “Both have achieved enormous success as artists, but even more, they make art that reflects the power and potential of portraiture in the 21st century.”

The tradition of the president and first lady posing for portraits for the National Portrait Gallery dates back to George H.W. Bush. Both Wiley’s and Sherald’s pieces will be revealed in early 2018 as permanent additions to the gallery in Washington, D.C.

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