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Are Skyquakes Real?

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by Alex Carter

In 2012 YouTube was inundated with videos of a very rare atmospheric phenomenon—the skyquake. Skyquakes are characterized by unexplained noises coming from the sky, often in remote areas with no obvious explanation as to the source of the sound. Skyquakes have been recorded all over the world, and in every case, the sky suddenly takes on a creepy hue and emits unsettling, unnatural noises.

The reason it’s easy to say that it was 2012 is because they were all uploaded to the same YouTube channel, skyquake2012, a channel that specialized in taking shaking, amateur phone footage and adding the creepy trumpet sound from Kevin Smith’s Red State movie. In other words, they were all hoaxes.

But the phenomenon itself is no hoax. A skyquake is a real event that has been documented for centuries.

It’s difficult to distinguish between fakes, videos of unexplained noises that are of human origin, and genuine skyquakes, but the real examples of this phenomenon are all described the same way by those who experience them: a loud boom that sounds like distant cannon fire. Weirdly, the genuine ones all occur near coastal areas.

No one has been able to fully explain why certain areas experience periodic skyquakes, but enough evidence exists to suggest these are real phenomena and that the residents of these areas aren't making up stories. The fact that there are words to describe the event in different languages lends further credibility. In Japan they are called uminari (海鳴り, "the rumbling of the sea"); in Dutch, "mistpoeffers"; and in parts of the U.S., "Seneca Guns."

Some skyquakes are said to have human origins, like when a military aircraft breaks the sound barrier—by the time the sonic boom is heard, the plane is no longer in sight. But that doesn’t explain any that were recorded before the invention of aircraft, which means there must be other explanations. One popular theory is that the sound is due to meteorites exploding in the upper atmosphere, although that raises the question as to why the bright flash accompanying the explosion isn’t more visible. Others suggest the noise may be due to thunder from storms over the horizon, which is plausible only if you don’t know what thunder sounds like.

The most likely explanation is that the Earth is passing gas. (Really!) The sound of gas escaping from underground vents would resemble a quiet volcano, or distant explosions, which would explain not only the sound, but why the sounds are pretty much only heard in coastal areas. Many of the vents weak enough to allow gas out would be underwater, and in many cases the gas may be due to decaying biomatter at the bottom of the lake. The gas could also be escaping from underwater caves that are collapsing.

All of this is to say, if you ever hear an unexplained explosion, rest assured that it was only the Earth. But for fun, you can still blame it on the dog.

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Weather Watch
New Contest Will Give Kids the Chance to Become Weather Channel Meteorologists for a Day
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Not every kid dreams of being an on-air meteorologist, but for young ‘uns obsessed with storm forecasts and local weather reports, a new contest presents a unique opportunity to live out their dreams. The Mini Meteorologist Contest, sponsored by Lands’ End, will give four kids a chance to present a weather report on The Weather Channel this summer.

The nationwide contest is open to future meteorologists in the U.S. and Canada ages 6 to 16. To enter, they just have to write an essay between 50 and 500 words long on why they love learning about science and weather and why they’d like to be a meteorologist for a day. Four winners will receive a trip for them and their parents to The Weather Channel’s headquarters in Atlanta. They’ll have the opportunity to report the weather for the show on July 12, which happens to be National Summer Learning Day.

The essays will be judged based in equal parts on creativity, grammar, and the entrant’s love of meteorology. The only rules for the essays are that they can’t mention any products or brands other than Lands’ End or The Weather Channel (so no essays about how L.L. Bean inspired your love of cloud formations, kids) and has to be the child’s original work. Kids who are chosen as semi-finalists will have their on-air presentation skills judged in a Skype interview.

Should they win, they’ll get an inclusive trip to Atlanta with media training, a tour of The Weather Channel headquarters, and a $500 Lands’ End gift card to get just the right weather-reporting wardrobe.

The deadline for entering is May 21. Essays can be submitted here.

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Weather Watch
Thanks to Desert Dust, Eastern Europe Is Covered in Orange Snow
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Certain areas of Eastern Europe are starting to look a bit like Mars. Over the last few days, snowy places like Sochi, Russia have experienced an unusual snowfall that coated mountains in orange powder, according to the BBC.

The orange snow was the result of winds blowing sand from the Sahara east to places like Moldova, Romania, Bulgaria, Ukraine, and Russia. The sand mixes with precipitation to form orange-tinted snow. According to the BBC, the phenomenon occurs semi-regularly, turning snow orange about once every five years, but this year is especially sandy. As a result, skiers are navigating slopes that look like they're from a different world, as you can see in the video below from The Guardian.

The Sahara rarely gets snow, but when it does, the landscape can look somewhat similar, as you can see in this image of the Atlas mountains in Morocco.

Instagram is currently filled with photos and videos from Eastern Europe featuring the odd-looking snow. Check out a few samples below.

[h/t BBC]

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