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7 Brilliantly Useless Websites You Won't Believe Exist

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by Jenny Morrill

Bored at work? It's OK—everyone needs to take a break at some point during the day. (Trust us, it's science.) But checking social media or catching up on the latest news may not be the best way to spend your downtime. Perhaps you should try watching an animated taco spin around your browser instead.

Below, we've collected seven useless, whimsical, and just-plain-weird websites to waste your time on. Try not to get addicted.

1. TACO SPIN

A hard-shell taco spins on a white background, labeled with the number four.
Screenshot via Taco Spin

This one is even more mindless than you might imagine. It's a taco. It spins. Seriously, that's it. There is, however, a fabulous soundtrack. And it counts the number of spins you've watched, so staring at it for long enough starts to feel like an accomplishment.

2. THE MOST SECONDS

A screenshot from The Most Seconds reads 'You have been here for 20 seconds.'
Screenshot via The Most Seconds

How many seconds can you stand the boredom of watching this number increase?

3. IS MY COMPUTER ON?

An off-white image reads 'No Spoilers!'

Here's a handy guide to checking whether or not your computer is on. (If you're a fan of this one, we must refer you to that other wonderfully informative site, Is It Christmas?)

4. RANDOM COLOUR

An entirely magenta image

Screenshot via Random Colour

The idea behind Random Colour is incredibly simple, but at least you get the element of surprise. Every time you refresh the page, the entire site turns a new color. Warning: Fiddling around with this one for too long will definitely give you a headache.

5. FALLING FALLING

Blocks of color appear to fall backward off the page.
Screenshot via Falling Falling

This color-themed site is a little more dynamic than Random Colour, but just as pointless. The colors endlessly fall off the page. Totally hypnotic.

6. USELESS SITE

A hand-drawn arrow points to a box for the reader to click under a banner that reads 'Useless Site.'
Screenshot via Useless Site

Yes, it's as useless as the name promises, yet somehow, it's not even the most useless site on this list. Go ahead, click that checkbox—you'll keep clicking for way longer than you should.

7. LLAMA FONT

A series of llama drawings in the shape of letters spells out 'I love llamas!'
Screenshot via Llama Font

Llama Font is a site made for those few people who reside firmly in the middle of the Venn diagram of "typography geeks" and "fans of South American camelids." You can spell out anything using illustrated llamas. And no matter how long your sentences run, these llamas won't lead you on a high-speed chase.

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Every Emoji Ever, Arranged by Color
Pop Chart Lab
Pop Chart Lab

What lies at the end of the emoji rainbow? It's not a pot of gold, but rather an exclamation point—a fitting way to round out the Every Emoji Ever print created by the design experts over at Pop Chart Lab.

As the name suggests, every emoji that's currently used in version 10.0.0 of Unicode is represented, which, if you're keeping track, is nearly 2400.

Each emoji was painstakingly hand-illustrated and arranged chromatically, starting with yellow and ending in white. Unicode was most recently updated last summer, with 56 emojis added to the family. Some of the newest members of the emoji clan include a mermaid, a couple of dinosaurs, a UFO, and a Chinese takeout box. However, the most popular emoji last year was the "despairing crying face." Make of that what you will.

Past posters from Pop Chart Lab have depicted the instruments played in every Beatles song, every bird species in North America, and magical objects of the wizarding world. The price of the Every Emoji Ever poster starts at $29, and if you're interested, the piece can be purchased here.

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A Brief History of the High Five
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Getty Images

Since 2002, the third Thursday of April is recognized as National High Five Day—a 24-hour period for giving familiars and strangers alike as many high fives as humanly possible. A few University of Virginia students invented the day, which has since evolved into a “High 5-A-Thon” that raises money each year for for a good cause. (For 2018, it's CoachArt, a nonprofit organization that engages kids impacted by chronic illness in arts and athletics.) Here are a few more facts about the history of the hand gesture to get you in the high-fiving spirit.

UP HIGH

That may sound like a lot of celebration for a simple hand gesture, but the truth is, the act of reaching your arm up over your head and slapping the elevated palm and five fingers of another person has revolutionized the way Americans (and many all over world) cheer for everything from personal achievements to miraculous game-winning plays in the sports world. Psychological studies on touch and human contact have found that gestures like the high five enhance bonding among sports teammates, which in turn has a winning effect on the whole team. Put 'er there!

DOWN LOW

There is some dispute about who actually invented the high five. Some claim the gesture was invented by Los Angeles Dodgers outfielder Glenn Burke when he spontaneously high-fived fellow outfielder Dusty Baker after a home run during a game in 1977. Others claim the 1978-79 Louisville basketball team started it on the court. Since no one could definitively pinpoint the exact origin, National High Five Day co-founder Conor Lastowka made up a story about Murray State basketballer Lamont Sleets inventing it in the late '70s/early '80s, inspired by his father's Vietnam unit, “The Fives.”

Regardless of which high-five origin story is more accurate, there is little question of its roots. The high five evolved from its sister-in-slappage, the low five. The gesture, also known as “slapping skin,” was made popular in the jazz age by the likes of Al Jolson, Cab Calloway and the Andrews Sisters.

GIMME FIVE

As the high five has evolved over the past few decades, variations have developed and become popular in and of themselves. Here are five popular styles:

The Baby Five
Before most babies learn to walk or talk, they learn to high five. Baby hands are much smaller than adult hands, so grownups have to either use one finger, scrunch their fingers together or flat-out palm it.

The Air Five
Also known as the "wi-five" in the more recent technology age, this one is achieved just like a regular high five, minus the hand-to-hand contact. Its great for germaphobes and long distance celebrations.

The Double High Five
Also known as a “high ten,” it is characterized by using both hands simultaneously to high five.

The Fist Bump
It's a trendy offshoot of the high five that made headlines thanks to a public display by the U.S. President and First Lady. Instead of palm slapping, it involves contact between the knuckles of two balled fists. In some cases, the fist bump can be “exploding,” by which the bump is followed by a fanning out of all involved fingers.

The Self High Five
If something awesome happens and there's no one else around, the self high five may be appropriate. It happens when one person raises one hand and brings the other hand up to meet it, high-five style. Pro-wrestler Diamond Dallas Page made the move famous in his appearances at WCW matches.

YOU'RE TOO SLOW!

Don't fall for that old joke. The key to a solid high five is threefold. Always watch for the elbow of your high-fiving mate to ensure accuracy; never leave a buddy hanging; and always have hand sanitizer on you. Have a Happy High Five Day!

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