CLOSE
Original image
iStock

Watch Popcorn Kernels Burst in Slow Motion

Original image
iStock

A good batch of popcorn is all about timing: Remove it from the heat source too soon and you’ll end up with a bunch of unpopped kernels; leave it unattended too long and you’ll be stuck with a burnt, inedible mess. This video, spotted by Motherboard, invites you to slow down and appreciate the culinary chemistry at play, one glorious kernel at a time.

For their experiment, the filmmakers behind the Youtube channel Warped Perception used a Phantom Flex 4K high-speed camera to capture popcorn bursting at 30,000 frames per second. The video starts with the corn contained in its hard, glossy hull. This outer shell is good at containing the moisture and starchy endosperm in each kernel of popcorn, but as the steam builds the exterior eventually gives way.The sudden drop in pressure is what makes the starch and proteins in the endosperm puff up, and the comparatively cool air outside the shell is what sets it into its snackable form. You can watch the whole mouth-watering process below.

[h/t Motherboard]

Original image
iStock
arrow
Big Questions
Jam vs. Jelly: What's the Difference?
Original image
iStock

The language of fruit spreads is a peculiar one. Spreads made from the squeezed-out remnants of oranges, berries, grapes, and other mashed-up foods can easily be confused for one another, with jam vs. jelly being a particular source of befuddlement. Here’s how to keep them straight. 

Jelly is made solely from the juice of fruit. The fruit is crushed and strained, and the liquid extract is boiled with added sugar and pectin to produce a thick, spreadable topping. Jam is produced in a similar way, but with one important distinction: It’s not strained. The goop leaves in chunks of crushed fruit, giving the spread a more robust consistency. Because it’s already thick, preparations of jam typically don’t call for a whole lot of pectin. Think of it as the chunky peanut butter to jelly’s regular, even though you might not see whole pieces of fruit suspended in the product.

Sometimes people will call a spread a “fruit preserve.” While that might mean the fruit chunks are larger and more noticeable, that’s not always the case. You might also see marmalades that look suspiciously like jams. The distinction there is that marmalades are typically sourced from citrus fruits like oranges or lemons.

Things get a little trickier in the UK, where “jelly” can refer either to a fruit spread or to the gelatin concoction Jell-O. The country also has pretty strict standards for applying the jam label: Jams need to be a minimum of 60 percent sugar in order to earn that title. The rule was created in the 1920s so the spreads would have a longer shelf life. (Sugar, in this instance, acts as a preservative.) Reducing the amount of sugar, which has been discussed among people wishing to keep all of their teeth, might result in a longer boil process and some loss of flavor.

And what of fruit butters and conserves? Fruit butters are made using fruit pulp for thick spreads, but don’t actually contain any butter. Conserves add nuts or raisins for added texture. These rogue spreads aren’t as common as jelly or jam.

We hope this clears up any jam vs. jelly confusion and that you find yourself better-informed to deal with the next naked piece of toast you encounter.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

Original image
iStock
arrow
Food
How to Make Perfect Fried Chicken, According to Chemistry
Original image
iStock

Cooking amazing fried chicken isn’t just art—it’s also chemistry. Learn the science behind the sizzle by watching the American Chemical Society’s latest "Reactions" video below.

Host Kyle Nackers explains the three important chemical processes that occur as your bird browns in the skillet—hydrolysis, oxidation, and polymerization—and he also provides expert-backed cooking hacks to help you whip up the perfect picnic snack.

SECTIONS

More from mental floss studios