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How to Fix a Candle That Won’t Light

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Candles can be expensive, so it’s a bummer when you can’t use them anymore. Every so often, a wick will get buried in the wax, making it impossible to light. Sure, you can dig it out with some scissors or the end of a fork, but that’s not the most elegant fix for your favorite candle. There’s a better method, one endorsed by eHowhome. You just need to melt some wax off the top.

If you’ve got a long reach lighter, just hold it over the surface of the candle until enough wax melts to expose the wick. This may take a few tries, but persevere. Your wick will eventually be available and ready to use.

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science
Here's Why It's So Hard to Achieve the Perfect Temperature While Taking a Shower
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The only thing worse than stepping out of a warm shower into a chilly bathroom is owning a shower that seems to only have two temperatures—scalding or freezing—unless the knob is positioned just so. Curious as to why it’s so hard to achieve bathing nirvana with a simple twist of the wrist? In the video below, SciShow host Stefan Chin broke down the intricacies of home plumbing, and offered advice on how to keep your shower from going from blissfully warm to bitingly cold.

With home water heaters, “adding really hot water to cold water changes the temperature more than adding the same amount of water that’s just warm,” Chin explains. “So if the water is too hot, tiny changes in how much hot water is sent your way can lead to big changes in the temperature of the mixed water hitting your body.”

And “the water in water heaters is usually very hot,” he adds. “It’s generally set to around 50°C [about 122°F] to kill bacteria.”

Meanwhile, some small water heaters simply don’t hold enough hot water at any one time for a long shower—plus, lots of plumbing simply isn’t designed to check the temperature of the hot-cold water balance.

A hot shower is perhaps the simplest—yet most universal—luxury you can enjoy, so you probably don’t want to waste your precious relaxing time fiddling with the dial. (Plus, some creative types find that their best ideas often emerge when they’re relaxed and sudsed up—something that can't really happen when you're being doused with cold water.) Rest assured, Chin has some shower solutions, which you can learn by watching the video below.

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Animals
Bissell’s Portable Dog Washer Might Be the Easiest Way to Clean Your Pet
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Doggie bath time isn’t always a fun time. It’s messy, everyone gets wet, and it takes forever. A portable dog-bathing machine could be the answer.

Bissell’s BarkBath looks sort of like a weird vacuum designed to work on your dog’s fur. You drag the hose along your dog’s body, and the nozzle simultaneously shoots water and no-rinse shampoo out and sucks it back up into the tank, so your dog ends up being only slightly damp during the process—which the company says takes as little as 10 minutes. (You can see how it works in this YouTube video.) As a result, you don’t need to do it in the bathtub. You could wash your dog in the living room if you really wanted to.

A cross-section shows the BarkBath squirting out water and sucking it up at the same time.
Bissel via YouTube

Bissell estimates that it takes about 48 ounces of water to wash a dog with BarkBath, compared to around 19 gallons to wash your dog in a tub, so it saves a good amount of water, whether you bathe your dog once a month or once a year. (Recommendations on bathing dogs vary from once a week to once every three months.)

If your dog hates to get wet, it may be easier to convince them to undergo a rapid clean with BarkBath rather than being soaked for 30 minutes while you rinse, shampoo, and rinse again. If your dog is skittish about noise, though, the machine might add yet another stressor to the bathing experience.

If your dog can handle a weird machine that both squirts water and suctions it off their fur, the BarkBath could be the answer to canine sanitation. Because washing your dog shouldn’t make more of a mess than it cleans up.

It’s $141 on Amazon.

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