CLOSE
Original image
Hasbro / Getty Images

Monopoly Is Asking Fans to Pick the New Game Tokens

Original image
Hasbro / Getty Images

Unless you're playing with a themed or off-brand board (hello, Cat-opoly), then you probably know what tokens are coming with your Monopoly game. The current line-up—the battleship, top hat, thimble, wheelbarrow, cat, Scottie dog, car, and shoe—isn't much different than the original group that debuted in 1935. Now, Monopoly is throwing tradition to the wind and asking its fans what kind of playing pieces they'd like to see.

Monopoly and Buzzfeed teamed up to start a new event called Monopoly Token Madness. From today until January 31, fans can head to VoteMonopoly.com and pick their favorite tokens out of a list of 64 options, including a gramophone, a T.rex, a penguin, and a flip flop. The winning pieces will become the new standard and possibly knock out existing favorites like the Scottie dog.

You can click here to vote for your favorites.

Original image
iStock
arrow
video
This Puzzling Math Brain Teaser Has a Simple Solution
Original image
iStock

Fans of number-based brainteasers might find themselves pleasantly stumped by the following question, posed by TED-Ed’s Alex Gendler: Which sequence of integers comes next?

1, 11, 21, 1211, 111221, ?

Mathematicians may recognize this pattern as a specific type of number sequence—called a “look-and-say sequence"—that yields a distinct pattern. As for those who aren't number enthusiasts, they should try reading the numbers they see aloud (so that 1 becomes "one one," 11 is "two ones," 21 is "one two, one one,” and so on) to figure the answer.

Still can’t crack the code? Learn the surprisingly simple secret to solving the sequence by watching the video below.

Original image
iStock
arrow
Art
A Beached Whale Sculpture Popped Up on the Banks of Paris's Seine River
Original image
iStock

In Paris, dozens of fish varieties live in the Seine River. Now, the Associated Press reports that the famous waterway is home to a beached whale.

Rest assured, eco-warriors: The sperm whale is actually a lifelike sculpture, installed on an embankment next to Notre Dame Cathedral by Belgian artists’ collective Captain Boomer. It’s meant to raise environmental awareness, and evoke "the child in everyone who still is puzzled about what is real and what is not,” collective member Bart Van Peel told the Associated Press.

The 65-foot sculpture has reportedly startled and confused many Parisians, thanks in part to a team of fake scientists deployed to “survey” the whale. One collective member even posted a video on social media, warning Parisians that there “may be others in the water” if they opt to take a dip in the river, The Local reported.

The whale sculpture is only temporary—but as for Captain Boomer, this isn’t their first whale-related stunt. Last summer, the collective installed a similar riverside artwork in Rennes, France, and they also once strapped a large-scale whale sculpture to the back of a truck and drove it around France.

[h/t Associated Press]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios