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YouTube User Remakes Home Alone Ending—and Adds Lots of Blood

YouTube
YouTube

The 1990 film Home Alone is a blueprint for turning any house into an obstacle course for intruders. But thanks to the magic of Hollywood, 8-year-old Kevin McCallister’s series of punishing booby traps—designed to thwart burglars Harry and Marv from robbing his home—result in few visible injuries, aside from a humorously placed burn here and a glue-coated feather there.

For fans who have always imagined the Wet Bandits facing a much darker (or should we say redder) fate, Mashable reports that a creative YouTube user, who goes by the name BitMassive, has created two alternate endings for the film that are way gorier than any scenarios director Chris Columbus had up his sleeve. They’re called Home Alone With Blood, and if blockbusters with body counts don't faze you, you can view them below.

[h/t Mashable]

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language
How to Say Merry Christmas in 26 Different Languages
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iStock

“Merry Christmas” is a special greeting in English, since it’s the only occasion we say “merry” instead of “happy.” How do other languages spread yuletide cheer? Ampersand Travel asked people all over the world to send in videos of themselves wishing people a “Merry Christmas” in their own language, and while the audio quality is not first-rate, it’s a fun holiday-themed language lesson.

Feel free to surprise your friends and family this year with your new repertoire of foreign-language greetings.

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History
The Queen of Code: Remembering Grace Hopper
By Lynn Gilbert, CC BY-SA 4.0, Wikimedia Commons

Grace Hopper was a computing pioneer. She coined the term "computer bug" after finding a moth stuck inside Harvard's Mark II computer in 1947 (which in turn led to the term "debug," meaning solving problems in computer code). She did the foundational work that led to the COBOL programming language, used in mission-critical computing systems for decades (including today). She worked in World War II using very early computers to help end the war. When she retired from the U.S. Navy at age 79, she was the oldest active-duty commissioned officer in the service. Hopper, who was born on this day in 1906, is a hero of computing and a brilliant role model, but not many people know her story.

In this short documentary from FiveThirtyEight, directed by Gillian Jacobs, we learned about Grace Hopper from several biographers, archival photographs, and footage of her speaking in her later years. If you've never heard of Grace Hopper, or you're even vaguely interested in the history of computing or women in computing, this is a must-watch:

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