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Ben & Jerry's
Ben & Jerry's

Is Ben & Jerry's Making a New Bourbon-Flavored Ice Cream?

Ben & Jerry's
Ben & Jerry's

Is there any better pairing than Ben & Jerry's and alcohol? Nearly two years after the beloved ice cream company announced a partnership with New Belgium to make ice cream-themed beer, they've returned with another boozy surprise: bourbon-flavored ice cream.

While it's not exactly official yet, there are some convincing rumors swirling that a flavor called Urban Bourbon will be hitting the shelves soon. Candy Hunting has already released an image of the supposed packaging, and we're certainly clutching our spoons in anticipation. The new flavor is said to feature some pretty appetizing ingredients: burnt caramel ice cream (yes) with almonds (ohh), fudge flakes (ahh), and bourbon caramel swirls (OK, we're sold). If you're not convinced this flavor is the real deal, Thrillist points out that there's a landing page for Urban Bourbon on Walmart's website, although it doesn't lead anywhere—yet.

If so, this would be the latest in a series of bourbon-centric flavors in the Ben & Jerry's ice cream-verse. Bourbon Pecan Pie has been a longtime favorite, and a new flavor called Bourbon Brown Butter—bourbon brown butter ice cream with dark chocolate whiskey cordial cups and a bourbon brown butter swirl—has debuted at some scoop shops. As far as non-bourbon boozy flavors, there's the oft-missed flavors White Russian, Dublin Mudslide, and Vermonty Python that all featured liqueurs.

If and when this flavor arrives, we'll be ready with bowls in hand.

[h/t Thrillist]

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Jesse Hunniford/MONA
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alcohol
A Restaurant In Australia Is Garnishing Its Margaritas With Frozen Eyeballs
Jesse Hunniford/MONA
Jesse Hunniford/MONA

A cocktail special at a new restaurant in Australia has fallen under the global gaze thanks to its floating gaze. As Nerdist reports, Faro Tapas, a new Spanish eatery at Tasmania's Museum of Old and New Art (MONA), offers a black margarita garnished with a frozen bull eyeball.

The frosty drink contains tequila, mezcal, lime, and charcoal (presumably for color). It's served in a glass with a black salted rim and the aforementioned toothpick-skewered peeper.

Gourmet Traveller recommends that those brave enough to sample Faro Tapas's bovine booze drink it quickly, as the eyeball's ice casing melts. (If you're willing to risk brain freeze to avoid eye mush, this sounds like a smart move.)

That said, adventurous drinkers with stomachs of steel might find Faro Tapas's eyeball-garnished margarita tame compared to the Yukon Territory's Sourtoe cocktail (it contains a dehydrated human toe) and countless other weird and wacky cocktails served up around the world. Bottoms (and eyeballs) up!

[h/t Nerdist]

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Health
Drink Up: New Study Concludes Wine Can Offset Dementia
iStock
iStock

The health benefits of wine can sometimes be overstated by people who are a few glasses deep and slurring their words. Should you ever find yourself in a position to defend your moderate imbibing, you have supporting evidence: A new study says two glasses of wine daily can potentially reduce your risk of developing Alzheimer's.

The study, which appears in Scientific Reports, shows that wine has an effect on one's glymphatic function, or the way the brain removes toxins. To clear itself of damaging and accumulated proteins like tau and beta amyloid, which are often linked with dementia, the brain pumps in cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) to act as a flushing solution. All sorts of variables can influence the glymphatic system's operation, including trauma, stroke, and excessive alcohol intake.

But when researchers dosed the mice in the study with moderate alcohol—amounting to 2.6 drinks daily—the glymphatic system was more efficient, removing more waste and exhibiting less inflammation than the teetotaling control mice.

As is usually the case when it comes to booze, you can have too much of a good thing. When mice got the equivalent of 7.9 drinks daily, their glymphatic system grew sluggish until the overindulging was terminated.

"Studies have shown that low-to-moderate alcohol intake is associated with a lesser risk of dementia, while heavy drinking for many years confers an increased risk of cognitive decline," lead study author Maiken Nedergaard, of the University of Rochester Medical Center, said in a press statement. "This study may help explain why this occurs. Specifically, low doses of alcohol appear to improve overall brain health."

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