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From Test Tube to Tavern: London Craft Brewery Uses DNA Testing to Create Bespoke Beer 

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If you’re willing to shell out nearly $31,000 for a bespoke brew, The Drinks Business reports that Meantime Brewing Company, a London-based craft beer company, is now offering customers the chance to create a beer that appeals specifically to their individual flavor profiles by using DNA testing.

Meantime Brewing Company has joined forces with genetics company 23andMe to make custom beverages, which they’re advertising as “the world’s most personalized beer.” Dubbed “Meantime Bespoke,” the service begins with 23andMe’s scientists, who test beer lovers’ saliva samples for hereditary variations in oral taste receptors (which involves a taste gene called TAS2R38). This helps identify genetic variants that may determine whether drinkers are disposed toward certain flavor profiles—think sweetness or bitterness—in beer. (This is reportedly determined in part based on customers’ sensitivity to a bitter compound called 6-n-propylthiouracil.)

Once your genetic makeup is analyzed, Meantime’s brewers will use the scientists’ findings to guide the brewing process. You’ll consult with a brewmaster to contribute feedback, and ensure that the final product is exactly suited to your liking. If you want, you can even partake in the fun by adding hops and grain to the mix and testing it. (To ensure your skills are up to snuff, your commissioning cost also pays for a beer-making course called “The Knowledge.”)

After the brewing process is complete, customers are supplied with more than 2000 pints of customized beer. For an additional fee, they can personalize the packaging design, purchase custom glassware, or have their personalized brew poured in Meantime’s tasting rooms and have kegs sent to their local bar.

So far, there are no testimonials from customers on whether Meantime Bespoke’s science-inspired venture really produces the perfect pint. But according to Meantime, their head brewer, Ciaran Giblin, recently became the world's first person to create his own beer inspired by his DNA flavor profile. He prefers bitter tastes, so he ended up with a hoppy Double IPA.

[h/t The Drinks Business]

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A Restaurant In Australia Is Garnishing Its Margaritas With Frozen Eyeballs
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Jesse Hunniford/MONA

A cocktail special at a new restaurant in Australia has fallen under the global gaze thanks to its floating gaze. As Nerdist reports, Faro Tapas, a new Spanish eatery at Tasmania's Museum of Old and New Art (MONA), offers a black margarita garnished with a frozen bull eyeball.

The frosty drink contains tequila, mezcal, lime, and charcoal (presumably for color). It's served in a glass with a black salted rim and the aforementioned toothpick-skewered peeper.

Gourmet Traveller recommends that those brave enough to sample Faro Tapas's bovine booze drink it quickly, as the eyeball's ice casing melts. (If you're willing to risk brain freeze to avoid eye mush, this sounds like a smart move.)

That said, adventurous drinkers with stomachs of steel might find Faro Tapas's eyeball-garnished margarita tame compared to the Yukon Territory's Sourtoe cocktail (it contains a dehydrated human toe) and countless other weird and wacky cocktails served up around the world. Bottoms (and eyeballs) up!

[h/t Nerdist]

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Health
Drink Up: New Study Concludes Wine Can Offset Dementia
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The health benefits of wine can sometimes be overstated by people who are a few glasses deep and slurring their words. Should you ever find yourself in a position to defend your moderate imbibing, you have supporting evidence: A new study says two glasses of wine daily can potentially reduce your risk of developing Alzheimer's.

The study, which appears in Scientific Reports, shows that wine has an effect on one's glymphatic function, or the way the brain removes toxins. To clear itself of damaging and accumulated proteins like tau and beta amyloid, which are often linked with dementia, the brain pumps in cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) to act as a flushing solution. All sorts of variables can influence the glymphatic system's operation, including trauma, stroke, and excessive alcohol intake.

But when researchers dosed the mice in the study with moderate alcohol—amounting to 2.6 drinks daily—the glymphatic system was more efficient, removing more waste and exhibiting less inflammation than the teetotaling control mice.

As is usually the case when it comes to booze, you can have too much of a good thing. When mice got the equivalent of 7.9 drinks daily, their glymphatic system grew sluggish until the overindulging was terminated.

"Studies have shown that low-to-moderate alcohol intake is associated with a lesser risk of dementia, while heavy drinking for many years confers an increased risk of cognitive decline," lead study author Maiken Nedergaard, of the University of Rochester Medical Center, said in a press statement. "This study may help explain why this occurs. Specifically, low doses of alcohol appear to improve overall brain health."

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