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Star Trek Fan Builds Klingon Warship Entirely From LEGO Bricks

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Proving that nerdy interests don’t need to be mutually exclusive, io9 reports that a German man named Kevin J. Walter has built a miniature version of the Klingon Bird-of-Prey ship from the Star Trek saga, entirely from LEGO bricks.

Walter told io9 that the project is his way of paying tribute to the TV show’s recent 50th anniversary. From conception to finished product, the model took him around eight years to complete, including a year and a half or so to construct the final version.

The space ship's model is based on a virtual design, which the LEGO hobbyist tweaked from 2008 and 2010. As for its individual sections, the ship is built from a variety of LEGO parts that Walter ordered from BrickLink—some of which he repurposed in creative ways. (Example: Walter used Bilbo Baggins’s front door to make the ship’s guns.)

Initially, Walter wanted to make the wings moveable, but they proved to be too heavy and frail during the later stages of construction, CBR.com reports. Walter’s mock-up also called for more than 250,000 plastic bricks, but he ended up only using around 25,000. In its final state (including the stand), the ship is a little over two feet long, and ranges in width from 16 inches to nearly three feet.

Check out a photo below, or visit Walter’s Flickr page to view more images. And keep your eyes peeled for yet another LEGO project, courtesy of Walter: a 150,000-piece LEGO model of Barad-dûr, or “The Dark Tower,” from The Lord of the Rings franchise. It’s been in the works for more than six years, and Walter hopes to complete it by the end of the year, just in time for The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers's 15th anniversary in December.

[h/t io9]

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Data Viz Project, Ferdio // CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
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Design
From Donut Charts to Bubble Maps, This Site Will Help You Choose the Best Way to Visualize Your Data
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Data Viz Project, Ferdio // CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

For many researchers, gathering data is the fun part of their job. But figuring out how to convey those numbers in a clear and visually appealing way is where they lose confidence. The Data Viz Project streamlines this step: With more than 150 types of data visualizations organized by different categories, finding the perfect format for your information is quick and painless.

According to Co.Design, the compendium comes from the Copenhagen-based infographics agency Ferdio and it took four years to develop. It started as a collection of physical graphs and charts posted on the walls of their office before moving online for all employees to use. Now, they’re making the project accessible to the public.

The website includes all the basic visualizations, like the line graph, the pie chart, and the Venn diagram. But it also makes room for the obscure: The chord diagram, the violin plot, and the convex treemap are a few of the more distinctive entries.

At first, the number of options can seem overwhelming, but narrowing them down is simple. If you’re looking for a specific type of visualization, like a chart, diagram, or table, you can select your category from the list labeled "family." From there you can limit your results even further by selecting the type of data you're inputting, the intended function (geographical data, trend over time), and the way you want it to look (bars, pyramids, pictographs).

Each image comes with its own description and examples of how it can be used in the real world. Check out some examples below to expand your own data visualization knowledge.

Alluvial Diagram
Alluvial Diagram

Arc Diagram
Arc Diagram

Hive Plot
Hive Plot

Hexagonal Binning
Hexagonal Binning

Violin Plot
Violin Plot

Packed Circle Chart
Packed Circle Chart

Kagi Chart
Kagi Chart

Sorted Stream Graph
Sorted Stream Graph

[h/t Co.Design]

All images courtesy of Ferdio // CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

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Central Park Could Someday Be Home to the World's Tallest Wooden Tower
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DFA

A proposed wooden tower in Central Park would break world records and clean polluted waters—all while providing visitors with a stunning view of one of the world’s largest urban parks, according to Architectural Digest.

Designed by New York studio DFA, the prefabricated timber structure—called Central Park Tower—would loom 712 feet above Manhattan, making it the tallest of its kind. But it wouldn’t exist purely for ornamental purposes.

Standing in the center of the park’s scenic (yet horribly polluted) Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Reservoir, the tower would also come equipped with a vertical-axis wind turbine. This eco-friendly feature would generate power to filter the 106-acre man-made lake’s approximately 1 billion gallons of contaminated water. Since few people would likely turn down the chance to score a great aerial view of the Big Apple, Central Park Tower would also offer a 56-foot-wide viewing platform, providing park visitors a panorama of the city.

Central Park Tower would be manufactured offsite and constructed in less than six months, according a DFA press release. Even though the project wouldn’t require months of labor or expensive materials, it would still rank among the city’s metal and glass skyscrapers as one of the 50 tallest buildings in all of New York. We'll toast a glass of purified water to that.

Check out some renderings of the proposed project below:

A rendering of Central Park Tower, a 712-foot-tall prefabricated timber observation tower proposed for New York’s Central Park that's designed by studio DFA.
DFA

A rendering of Central Park Tower, a 712-foot-tall prefabricated timber observation tower proposed for New York’s Central Park that's designed by studio DFA.
DFA

A rendering of Central Park Tower, a 712-foot-tall prefabricated timber observation tower proposed for New York’s Central Park that's designed by studio DFA.
DFA

[h/t Architectural Digest]

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