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Everyone Really Hates the Word "Whatever"

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by Jeva Lange

Never mind that the best quote of 2016 contains the dismissal "whatever"—the word is universally abhorred for the eighth year running, a new poll released by the Marist Institute for Public Opinion reveals.

Thirty-eight percent of Americans this year reported that "whatever" annoys them more than any other word or phrase commonly used in conversation, with 20 percent despising "no offense but," 14 percent disliking "ya know, right?" and "I can't even," and eight percent saying they can't take the word "huge."

"Like" and "no worries," which made the list last year, did not appear on 2016's list. "Huge" saw a three percent increase in irking people—though why that is, of course, remains a mystery.

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How to Say Merry Christmas in 26 Different Languages
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“Merry Christmas” is a special greeting in English, since it’s the only occasion we say “merry” instead of “happy.” How do other languages spread yuletide cheer? Ampersand Travel asked people all over the world to send in videos of themselves wishing people a “Merry Christmas” in their own language, and while the audio quality is not first-rate, it’s a fun holiday-themed language lesson.

Feel free to surprise your friends and family this year with your new repertoire of foreign-language greetings.

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How Often Is 'Once in a Blue Moon'? Let Neil deGrasse Tyson Explain
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From “lit” to “I can’t even,” lots of colloquialisms make no sense. But not all confusing phrases stem from Millennial mouths. Take, for example, “once in a blue moon”—an expression you’ve likely heard uttered by teachers, parents, newscasters, and even scientists. This term is often used to describe a rare phenomenon—but why?

Even StarTalk Radio host Neil deGrasse Tyson doesn’t know for sure. “I have no idea why a blue moon is called a blue moon,” he tells Mashable. “There is nothing blue about it at all.”

A blue moon is the second full moon to appear in a single calendar month. Astronomy dictates that two full moons can technically occur in one month, so long as the first moon rises early in the month and the second appears around the 30th or 31st. This type of phenomenon occurs every couple years or so. So taken literally, “Once in a blue moon” must mean "every few years"—even if the term itself is often used to describe something that’s even more rare.

[h/t Mashable]

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