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Klamath National Forest. Image credit: Mkauffmann via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 3.0
Klamath National Forest. Image credit: Mkauffmann via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 3.0

National Forests Offer Permits for Guests Looking to Take Home Christmas Trees

Klamath National Forest. Image credit: Mkauffmann via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 3.0
Klamath National Forest. Image credit: Mkauffmann via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 3.0

It’s already been established that picking up a live Christmas tree locally can be better for the environment than buying a fake one. You should feel no shame then in browsing for trees at one of our country’s national forests this holiday season—assuming you have the proper permit, of course.

According to Travel + Leisure, the U.S. Forest Service offers permits to chop down trees for firewood and holiday decorations starting at $5. To see when your local national forest offers holiday tree permits and for what prices, you can call the forest district office before making your visit. Once you get out there, the U.S. Forest Service asks you take trees from overgrown areas at least 200 feet from the nearest camp ground, recreation site, or main road; choose one with a trunk less than 6 inches wide; and above all, stay safe. Any wood you collect from the forest cannot be resold.

If an aspiring young lumberjack is joining you on your journey, you might be able to take home the tree for free: As part of their collaboration with the Every Kid in a Park Program, the U.S. Forest Service is providing free permits to fourth graders at certain parks. In addition to the permit, kids will also receive a free ornament they can color and design themselves.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

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music
Everything You Need to Know About Record Store Day
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The unlikely resurgence of vinyl as an alternative to digital music formats is made up of more than just a small subculture of purists. Today, more than 1400 independent record stores deal in both vintage and current releases. Those store owners and community supporters created Record Store Day in 2007 as a way of celebrating the grassroots movement that’s allowed a once-dying medium to thrive.

To commemorate this year’s Record Store Day on Saturday, April 21, a number of stores (a searchable list can be found here) will be offering promotional items, live music, signings, and more. While events vary widely by store, a number of artists will be issuing exclusive LPs that will be distributed around the country.

For Grateful Dead fans, a live recording of a February 27, 1969 show at Fillmore West in San Francisco will be released and limited to 6700 copies; Arcade Fire’s 2003 EP album will see a vinyl release for the first time, limited to 3000 copies; "Roxanne," the Police single celebrating its 40th anniversary this year, will see a 7-inch single release with the original jacket art.

The day also promises to be a big one for David Bowie fans. A special white vinyl version of 1977’s Bowie Now will be on shelves, along with Welcome to the Blackout (Live London ’78), a previously-unreleased, three-record set. Jimmy Page, Frank Zappa, Neil Young, and dozens of other artists will also be contributing releases.

No store is likely to carry everything you might want, so before making the stop, it might be best to call ahead and then plan on getting there early. If you’re one of the unlucky vinyl supporters without a brick and mortar store nearby, you can check out Discogs.com, which will be selling the special releases online.

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Big Questions
What Is the Meaning Behind "420"?
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Whether or not you’re a marijuana enthusiast, you’re probably aware that today is an unofficial holiday for those who are. April 20—4/20—is a day when pot smokers around the world come together to, well, smoke pot. Others use the day to push for legalization, holding marches and rallies.

But why the code 420? There are a lot of theories as to why that particular number was chosen, but most of them are wrong. You may have heard that 420 is police code for possession, or maybe it’s the penal code for marijuana use. Both are false. There is a California Senate Bill 420 that refers to the use of medical marijuana, but the bill was named for the code, not the other way around.

As far as anyone can tell, the phrase started with a bunch of high school students. Back in 1971, a group of kids at San Rafael High School in San Rafael, California, got in the habit of meeting at 4:20 to smoke after school. When they’d see each other in the hallways during the day, their shorthand was “420 Louis,” meaning, “Let’s meet at the Louis Pasteur statue at 4:20 to smoke.”

Somehow, the phrase caught on—and when the Grateful Dead eventually picked it up, "420" spread through the greater community like wildfire. What began as a silly code passed between classes is now a worldwide event for smokers and legalization activists everywhere—not a bad accomplishment for a bunch of high school stoners.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

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