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Firebox

Surround Yourself With 'Hatching' Egg Candles

Firebox
Firebox

Real-world, 21st century people like us will (probably) never get to experience the joy of watching a dinosaur or dragon hatch from an egg. Luckily, Firebox has the next best thing: Egg-shaped candles that reveal baby dragons and dinosaurs as they melt. Now you can become a proud reptilian parent, without the hassle of becoming Khaleesi or running a futuristic dinosaur amusement park. In fact, you can have both egg versions, because for a limited time, they're buy one, get one half off.

Both eggs stand at 14 centimeters tall (5.5 inches) and hold small porcelain figurines inside. As the candles burn, the figures emerge dramatically from the flames, covered in black soot (don't worry—it wipes off easily when cooled). The dragon egg randomly yields a red, green, or black baby; the dinosaur egg always gives you a Velociraptor. Once you're done with the candle, you can hang onto the toy as a keepsake. Just add both the dragon and dinosaur egg candles to your basket and $19.50 will be taken off automatically.

For more cool candles, you can also check out our list.

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The Clever Adaptations That Helped Some Animals Become Gigantic
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iStock

Imagine a world in which eagle-sized dragonflies buzzed through the air and millipedes as long as kayaks scuttled across Earth. "Ick"-factor aside for bug haters, these creatures aren't the product of a Michael Crichton fever dream. In fact, they actually existed around 300 million years ago, as MinuteEarth host Kate Yoshida explains.

How did the prehistoric ancestors of today’s itty-bitty insects get so huge? Oxygen, and lots of it. Bugs "breathe by sponging up air through their exoskeletons, and the available oxygen can only diffuse so far before getting used up," Yoshida explains. And when an atmospheric spike in the colorless gas occurred, this allowed the critters' bodies to expand to unprecedented dimensions and weights.

But that's just one of the clever adaptations that allowed some creatures to grow enormous. Learn more about these adaptations—including the ingenious evolutionary development that helped the biggest dinosaurs to haul their cumbersome bodies around, and the pair of features that boosted blue whales to triple their size, becoming the largest animals ever on Earth—by watching MinuteEarth's video below.

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Feathers, Fighting, and Feet: A Brief History of Dinosaur Art
Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain
Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain

One of the first-known works of dinosaur art was The country of the Iguanodon, an 1837 watercolor by John Martin. It depicts the ancient reptiles as giant iguanas, thrashing and fighting near a stone quarry—a far cry from today's sophisticated 3D renderings.

By watching the PBS Eons video below, you can learn how our image of dinosaurs has changed over the centuries, thanks to artworks based on new scientific discoveries and fossil findings. Find out why artists decided to give the prehistoric creatures either feathers or scales, make them either active or sluggish, present them as walking on two or four feet, and to imagine tails that either dragged or lifted, among other features.

Keep in mind, however, that both emerging technologies and new findings are constantly changing the way scientists view dinosaurs. A new species, on average, is named every two weeks—and this research will likely keep artists busy (and constantly revising their work) for years to come.

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