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Wheelchair Fashion Doll Launches on Kickstarter

In the mid-‘90s, Mattel attempted to represent the lives of kids with disabilities with the release of Share a Smile Becky, the first Barbie doll in a wheelchair. Becky's wheelchair may not have fit in the Barbie Dreamhouse, and her long hair was likely to get caught in the wheels, but still, it represented a slightly more inclusive world for the dolls and their owners. Unfortunately, the doll didn’t last long.

Nickolay Lamm, the creator behind dolls with realistic bodily proportions, some of which deal with periods, wants to bring wheelchairs back to the popular doll market. His latest Kickstarter is raising money for a toy wheelchair that will fit not just his own Lammily fashion dolls, but also Barbies and other similar-sized toys. Each one costs $18 on Kickstarter, with an estimated June 2017 delivery.

The 3D-printed, blue wheelchairs come with brightly patterned seats and have adjustable parts to customize the size to the specific doll and moveable foot rests. The chairs can fit Bratz dolls, Barbies, Monster High dolls, and more.

All images courtesy Nickolay Lamm

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The Force Field Cloak
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Design
This Glowing Blanket Is Designed to Ease Kids' Fear of the Dark
The Force Field Cloak
The Force Field Cloak

Many kids have a security blanket they bring to bed with them every night, but sometimes, a regular blankie is no match for the monsters that invade their imaginations once the lights are off. Now there’s a glow-in-the-dark blanket designed to make children feel safer in bed, no night light required.

Dubbed the Force Field Cloak, the fleece blanket comes in several colorful, glowing patterns that remain invisible during the day. At night, you leave the blanket under a bright light for about 10 minutes, then the shining design will reveal itself in the dark. The glow lasts 8 to 10 hours, just long enough to get a child through the night.

Inventor Terry Sachetti was inspired to create the blanket by his own experiences struggling with scary nighttime thoughts as a kid. "I remember when I was young and afraid of the dark. I would lie in my bed at night, and my imagination would start getting the best of me," he writes on the product's Kickstarter page. "I would start thinking that someone or something was going to grab my foot that was hanging over the side of the bed. When that happened, I would put my foot back under my blanket where I knew I was safe. Nothing could get me under my blanket. No boogiemen, no aliens, no monsters under my bed, nothing. Sound familiar?"

The Force Field Cloak, which has already surpassed its funding goals on both Indiegogo and Kickstarter, takes the comfort of a blanket to the next level. The glowing, non-toxic ink decorating the material acts as a gentle night light that kids can wrap around their whole body. The result, the team claims, is a secure feeling that quiets those thoughts about bad guys hiding in the shadows.

To pre-order a Force Field Cloak, you can pledge $36 or more to the product’s Indiegogo campaign. It is expected to start shipping in January 2018.

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JOYCE NALTCHAYAN/AFP/Getty Images
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holidays
The Most Popular Holiday Toys of the Past 35 Years
JOYCE NALTCHAYAN/AFP/Getty Images
JOYCE NALTCHAYAN/AFP/Getty Images

From Tamagotchis to Teddy Ruxpin, everyone remembers the most coveted holiday toys from their childhood—the toys that, whether you knew it then or not, your parents stood in line for hours to buy or paid premium prices for (it's not too late to thank them).

Online coupon site and shopping portal Ebates took a festive walk down memory lane to pay tribute to the most impossible-to-find toys of holiday seasons past, beginning with 1983's Cabbage Patch Kids craze and leading up to last year's Nintendo NES Classic. How many did you own?

The Most Popular Toys Through the Decades

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