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The Winner of the 2016 World's Biggest Liar Competition

If you stop for a drink at Bridge Inn in Holmrook, England, in November, you’d do well to take everything anyone says to you with a grain of salt—or maybe even a whole shaker. That’s because every fall, the Bridge Inn hosts the World’s Biggest Liar competition.

Entrants are given five minutes in the spotlight to tell the biggest and most convincing whopper they can muster. The winner is selected by a panel of judges.

Though George Kemp of Maryport, Cumbria, was suffering from a chest infection, he managed to power through with a yarn about the time he "ended up bumping into Donald Trump and his wife in an underwater hotel." The night marked his fourth win in the contest.

"It was a tale about building a small submarine out of my dad's old bubble car," Kemp said. "We took the bubble car on a trip to the Isle of Man and we bumped into several famous people in a Scottish submarine made out of shortbread tins. [Scottish politicians] Nicola Sturgeon and Alex Salmond sold some of these giant shortbread tin submarines to the United States of America." The evening ended with Kemp and the president-elect watching an Elvis tribute act called "Shellfish Presley."

Trump himself wouldn’t have been able to enter the competition, by the way—politicians and lawyers are banned from the contest because they are "too well versed to apply."

Held since the 19th century, the World’s Biggest Liar competition owes its origin to a pub owner named Will Ritson, who was known for the fantastic stories he would tell to keep his patrons entertained—and drinking longer. One of his most famous lies was that turnips planted in the region grew so big that people had to "quarry" into them for their Sunday lunch, and afterward, the mammoth root veggies were used as sheds for sheep.

Other first-place fibbers have told tales about eating peanut butter and mayonnaise sandwiches with Prince Charles, traveling to work via camel due to global warming, and fracking for jam.

Kemp donated his prize money to charity—and that's no lie.

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The Princess Ride: Here's What a Princess Bride Theme Park Attraction Might Look Like
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Do you fight the urge to say “Hello, my name is Inigo Montoya” when introducing yourself? Have you spent the past 30 years mispronouncing the word “marriage”? If so, you may be a diehard fan of The Princess Bride. The cult film (and the book on which it’s based) has inspired board games, merchandise, and countless pop culture references. Now, two theme park designers from Universal have conceived the inconceivable. As Nerdist reports, Jon Plsek and Olivia West have designed the plans for a hypothetical attraction called “The Princess Ride.

Their idea follows the classic river boat ride structure and adds highlights from the movie around each corner. After watching Buttercup and Wesley’s love story unfold, riders are taken past the Cliffs of Insanity, through the Fire Swamp, and into the Pit of Despair. The climax unfolds at Prince Humperdinck’s castle and leads up to the two protagonists riding off into the sunset. The last thing the passengers see is Miracle Max and Valerie waving goodbye saying, “Hope ya had fun stormin’ the castle!”

The ride’s designers make a living turning stories into thrilling attractions. Plsek works as a concept artist for Universal Creative, the group behind Universal’s theme parks, and West works there as a concept writer. While The Princess Ride was just a fun side project for the pair, it isn’t hard to imagine their ride bringing Princess Bride fans to the parks in real life.

For more of Jon Plesk’s concept rides inspired by classics like Dr. Strangelove (1964) and National Lampoon’s Vacation (1983), check out his website.

[h/t Nerdist]

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Watch a Chain of Dominos Climb a Flight of Stairs
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Dominos are made to fall down—it's what they do. But in the hands of 19-year-old professional domino artist Lily Hevesh, known as Hevesh5 on YouTube, the tiny plastic tiles can be arranged to fall up a flight of stairs in spectacular fashion.

The video spotted by Thrillist shows the chain reaction being set off at the top a staircase. The momentum travels to the bottom of the stairs and is then carried back up through a Rube Goldberg machine of balls, cups, dominos, and other toys spanning the steps. The contraption leads back up to the platform where it began, only to end with a basketball bouncing down the steps and toppling a wall of dominos below.

The domino art seems to flow effortlessly, but it took more than a few shots to get it right. The footage below shows the 32nd attempt at having all the elements come together in one, unbroken take. (You can catch the blooper at the end of an uncooperative basketball ruining a near-perfect run.)

Hevesh’s domino chains that don't appear to defy gravity are no less impressive. Check out this ambitious rainbow domino spiral that took her 25 hours to construct.

[h/t Thrillist]

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