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What Goes in the Empty Box?

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I love a good brain teaser. I'm not sure this is a good brain teaser, but I spent way too long trying to figure it out, so I'll toss it out here for you guys. What goes in the box? It's not six.

While you think about it, here's a different kind of puzzle. Can you spot the Oscar statuette hidden among the 3-CPOs?

OK, did you come up with the answer? If you've never driven a car with a manual transmission, it might have stumped you.

That was fun. Here are some other quizzes and puzzles:

Name the TV Titles Based on Their Antonyms
*
Pick the Only Vowel That Completes These Words
*
Can You Find the Cat in This Photo?
*
Name That Novel With Just Three Words

[h/t 22 Words]

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Art
Look Closely at This Footstep Illusion
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The best optical illusions are the ones you can try at home. Take the footstep trick below: All you need to recreate it is a white sheet of paper with black stripes and a transparent film sheet marked with yellow and blue blocks. It may look simple, but move the film across the page and the colored shapes will appear to shuffle forward like tiny footsteps.

The illusion, recently shared by The Kid Should See This, is the creation of Akiyoshi Kitaoka, a professor with the psychology department at Kyoto’s Ritsumeikan University. He explained the mechanism at work in a paper he published with psychology professor Stuart Anstis in 2015 [PDF].

According to the report, the colored blocks need to be two times the width of the black stripe and either light (like the yellow ones) or dark (the blue ones) for the trick to pay off. The illusion is all about contrast, so the colors are essential. The authors explain:

“When the dark blue squares lie on white stripes, they have high contrast (dark vs. white) and they appear to speed up momentarily. When they lie on black stripes, they have low contrast (dark vs. black) and they appear to slow down. The opposite is true for the light yellow squares.

Consequently, the squares appear to go faster and slower in alternation, like a pair of walking feet.”

The brain takes all sorts of shortcuts when it comes to perceiving color, and most of the time this goes unnoticed. But when an artist knows how to exploit this it can lead to some mend-bending tricks, like this image from Akiyoshi Kitaoka in which three colors appear to be four. Check out more of Kitaoka's psychedelic illusions on his webpage.

[h/t The Kid Should See This]

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Lightning-Fast Teen Sets New Rubik’s Cube World Record
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In less time than it takes some people to open a pickle jar, 15-year-old Patrick Ponce can solve a Rubik’s Cube. His total time of 4.69 seconds makes him the new holder of the world record for fastest 3-by-3 Rubik’s Cube completion, as highlighted by Compete (and seen in the video below).

Ponce achieved the impressive feat of dexterity at a tournament in Middletown, Virginia, on September 2. He takes the title from the previous Rubik’s Cube speed record holder, Feliks Zemdegs, who solved the puzzle in 4.73 seconds at a competition in Australia in December 2016.

But the teenager may not hold his new position at the top for very long: Expert Rubik's Cubers have been steadily lowering the speed record beneath the 5-second mark since 2015. And human competitors still have a long way to go before solving a cube in 0.887 seconds—that’s the record that was set by a robot in March of 2017.

[h/t Compete]

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