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Torsten Blackwood - Pool/Getty Images
Torsten Blackwood - Pool/Getty Images

Judge Rules to Allow Youth Lawsuit Over Climate Change to Go to Trial

Torsten Blackwood - Pool/Getty Images
Torsten Blackwood - Pool/Getty Images

In 2015, a group of 21 young people filed a lawsuit against the federal government arguing that by failing to act on climate change, the government was infringing on the next generation’s Fifth Amendment right to life, liberty, and property. Now, a judge has ruled that their lawsuit can proceed to trial, denying the motions to dismiss by fossil fuel industry representatives [PDF].

In her opinion, U.S. District Court Judge Ann Aiken (Oregon District, Eugene Division) wrote, “Federal courts too often have been cautious and overly deferential in the arena of environmental law, and the world has suffered for it” [PDF].

James Hansen, a leading climate scientist who is also acting as a plaintiff in the case, elaborates in a press statement that “we must ask the Court to require the government to reduce fossil fuel emissions at a rate consistent with the science.”

The lawsuit, brought by kids between the ages of 9 and 20, comes at an especially significant time, considering President-elect Donald Trump’s false claim that climate change is a “Chinese hoax” (it is not) and his avowed plans to cancel last year’s international climate agreement and appoint a climate-change denier to head the Environmental Protection Agency.

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The Most (and Least) Expensive States for Staying Warm This Winter
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It’s that time of year again: Temperatures outside have plummeted, while your monthly heating bill is on the rise. If you want an idea of how much heat will cost you this winter (perhaps you blocked out last year’s damage to your bank account), one reliable indicator is location.

Average energy expenses vary from state to state due to factors like weather, house size, and local gas prices. Using data from sources including the U.S. Energy Information Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency, WalletHub calculated the average monthly utility bill totals for all 50 states plus Washington D.C. in 2017.

Source: WalletHub

The personal finance website looked at four energy costs: electricity, natural gas, car fuel, and home heating oil. After putting these components together, Connecticut was found to be the state with the highest energy costs in 2017, with an average of $380 in monthly bills, followed by Alaska with $332 and Rhode Island with $329.

That includes data from the summer and winter months. For a better picture of which state’s residents spend the most on heat, we have to look at the individual energy costs. Michigan, which ranks 33rd overall, outdoes every other state in the natural gas department with an average bill of $60 a month. Alaska is close behind with $59, followed by Rhode Island With $58.

People living in Maine prefer oil to heat their homes, spending $84 a month on the fuel source. All six New England states—Maine, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts—occupy the top six spots in this category.

So which state should you move to if you want to see your heating bill disappear? In Florida, the average household spends just $3 a month on natural gas and $0 on heating oil. In Hawaii, on average, the oil bill is $0 as well, and slightly higher for gas at $4. Of course, they make up for it when it comes time to crank up the AC: Both states break the top 10 in highest electricity costs.


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Why Are Glaciers Blue?
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The bright azure blue sported by many glaciers is one of nature's most stunning hues. But how does it happen, when the snow we see is usually white? As Joe Hanson of It's Okay to Be Smart explains in the video below, the snow and ice we see mostly looks white, cloudy, or clear because all of the visible light striking its surface is reflected back to us. But glaciers have a totally different structure—their many layers of tightly compressed snow means light has to travel much further, and is scattered many times throughout the depths. As the light bounces around, the light at the red and yellow end of the spectrum gets absorbed thanks to the vibrations of the water molecules inside the ice, leaving only blue and green light behind. For the details of exactly why that happens, check out Hanson's trip to Alaska's beautiful (and endangered) Mendenhall Glacier below.

[h/t The Kid Should See This]

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