CLOSE
Original image

The Most Impressive Thing About All 50 States

Original image

Every state in the Union has something to boast about. From their famous food to historic achievements, here are some of our favorites.

1. ALABAMA

The Vulcan statue in Birmingham was made for the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair and is the largest cast iron statue in the world. It weighs in at 100,000 pounds, is 56 feet tall, and wears an apron but no pants—a fact that inspired a song devoted to the statue's buttocks, "Moon over Homewood."

2. ALASKA

iStock

At more than twice the size of the entire state of Rhode Island, Juneau—which is only accessible by plane or boat—is the largest state capital in the U.S. in terms of land area. Despite that size, its population is a mere 32,000.

3. ARIZONA

The only two places in the U.S. that still have mail delivered by mule are in the bottom of the Grand Canyon. Helicopters can’t make the trip, and UPS and FedEx refuse to—so the USPS contracts with a group of mailmen to make the eight-hour round trip daily.

4. ARKANSAS

Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

The first woman elected to the U.S. Senate was Hattie Caraway, a Democrat who was at first appointed to her husband’s seat after his death in 1931. She then won on her own merit, getting 92 percent of the vote, in 1932. She served for 14 years.

5. CALIFORNIA

This state is home of the craft beer boom: There were over 700 craft breweries in the state in late 2016, with more opening every month. It’s now a $7.3 billion industry, producing over 100 million gallons a year, which breaks down to 21 pints a year for every single Californian.

6. COLORADO

In 1999, the town of Fountain was chosen as America's Millennium City. A sociologist crunched census data and determined that, out of every place in the country, Fountain was the closest to the average American melting pot.

7. CONNECTICUT

This state is home to the Hartford Courant, the oldest continuously published newspaper in the United States. It was started on October 29, 1764 as the Connecticut Courant by printer Thomas Green, making it older than the U.S. During the Revolution, there was a paper shortage so severe that some issues were printed on wrapping paper.

8. DELAWARE

Bordering the Mason-Dixon Line with Maryland, this was an important stop on the Underground Railroad. Delawarean Thomas Garrett is credited with helping 2000 slaves escape, even though he lost his fortune doing it. Maryland authorities even put a reward of $10,000 out for his arrest.

9. FLORIDA

Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

Fort Zachary Taylor, located in Key West, Florida, was built starting in 1845 and named for the president after he died in office in 1850. In 1861, at the start of the Civil War, the Union seized the fort, and despite the fact that it was still unfinished and never saw combat, historians credit it with shortening the war by up to a year. At one point it was holding off 300 ships full of Confederate supplies.

10. GEORGIA

The voting age used to be decided by the states and was generally 21. During WWII this became controversial, since men were being drafted to fight and still couldn’t vote. Georgia was the first state to lower their voting age to 18, in 1943. The 26th Amendment wouldn’t be ratified until 1971.

11. HAWAII

What we think of as Hawaii is really just the eight main islands. In total, the state is made up of 137 islands spread over more than 1500 miles [PDF].

12. IDAHO

Located in the Nez Perce National Forest, Heaven’s Gate lookout is a small viewing area that allows you to see not only the deepest canyon in North America, but views of three other states: Washington, Oregon, and Montana.

13. ILLINOIS

Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

Chicago was the home of the world’s first skyscraper. Built in 1884-1885, the Home Insurance Building was a whopping 10 stories tall, or 138 feet—huge for the time. It was demolished in 1931.

14. INDIANA

The home of the Indy 500, the Indianapolis Motor Speedway is the biggest sporting venue in the world by a good margin. It has permanent seating for 257,000 people, and temporary on-field seating brings that up to 400,000.

15. IOWA

Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

Burlington is home to Snake Alley, what Ripley’s Believe It or Not called the “Crookedest Street in the World” (something the more famous Lombard Street in San Francisco also lays claim to). It was built in the 1800s to help horses get up a hill that was too steep for them to climb in a straight line.

16. KANSAS

Garden City, Kansas is home to a swimming pool so big it's possible to waterski in it (which has happened a few times as a promotional stunt). Opened in 1922, The Big Pool was renovated in the early aughts and is now the world's largest outdoor concrete municipal swimming pool. Bigger than a football field, it takes a full day to fill it to its 2.5-million-gallon capacity.

17. KENTUCKY

Bourbon, recognized as “a distinctive product of the United States” by Congress [PDF], was created in Kentucky. The state makes 95 percent of the world's bourbon supply—but its official drink is milk.

18. LOUISIANA

Louisiana has the tallest state capitol building—it's 34 stories and 450 feet tall.

19. MAINE

iStock

This state is famous for its lobster for good reason: They catch 75 to 80 percent of the nation’s haul each year, or over 100 million pounds.

20. MARYLAND

In honor of native Francis Scott Key—who wrote the words to "The Star Spangled Banner" while watching the bombardment of Fort McHenry in Baltimore Harbor—the U.S. flag has flown continuously over his Maryland birthplace since May 30, 1949.

21. MASSACHUSETTS

The first book printed in what is now the U.S. was the Bay Psalm Book produced in Cambridge in 1640; a copy was sold for a record $14,165,000 in 2013. These days, the state is home to the second and third largest public libraries in the United States (the Boston and Harvard University Library, respectively).

22. MICHIGAN

iStock

With more than 11,000 lakes and 36,000 miles of streams and rivers, Michigan is a state for water lovers. It touches four of the Great Lakes and no one standing in the state is ever more than 85 miles from one of them.

23. MINNESOTA

The Minneapolis Skyway is a system of enclosed pedestrian footpaths that cover 69 blocks over eight miles of the city. That way, people can walk around in comfort even in the dead of the very cold winters.

24. MISSISSIPPI

At the University of Mississippi Medical Center in 1963 and 1964, Dr. James D. Hardy would perform the first lung and animal-to-human heart transplants within the space of a year.

25. MISSOURI

Although we associate earthquakes with California, three of the 10 largest earthquakes in the contiguous United States happened in New Madrid in 1811-12.

26. MONTANA

iStock

Here’s a state for those who love the cold. According to Guinness World Records, the biggest snowflake ever seen was one that fell at Fort Keogh in 1887; it measured 15 inches across. And the lowest temperature in the lower 48 states was -70 degrees Fahrenheit, recorded in Rogers Pass in 1954.

27. NEBRASKA

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln takes their sports seriously, as you can tell by their giant weight room, which, at three-quarters of an acre, is the largest in the country.

28. NEVADA

iStock

Las Vegas is home to more than 150,000 hotel rooms, the most in any city in the world. And on the weekends they regularly hit more than 95 percent occupancy, so there is room for more.

29. NEW HAMPSHIRE

Theodor Seuss Geisel—a.k.a. Dr. Seuss—got his start at Dartmouth College. He was in his junior year, working at the college's humor magazine, the Jack-o-Lantern, when he "discovered the excitement of 'marrying’ words to pictures," he later said. "I began to get it through my skull that words and pictures were Yin and Yang. I began thinking that words and pictures, married, might possibly produce a progeny more interesting than either parent." The Jack-o-Lantern is also where he first used "Seuss."

30. NEW JERSEY

iStock

Blueberries were domesticated and first sold commercially in Whitesbog, New Jersey. Farmers did not believe the fruits could be domesticated, but Elizabeth White believed differently. In 1911, White—the daughter of a farmer—partnered with Frederick Coville, a botanist with the USDA, who had authored a paper called “Experiments in Blueberries.” Together they worked to create domestic varieties of blueberries by crossbreeding the best wild plants. They grew their first domestic blueberries the next year and sold their first commercial crop in 1916. White was dubbed the "Blueberry Queen."

31. NEW MEXICO

Every October, Albuquerque hosts the nine-day-long International Balloon Fiesta. Now in its 45th year, it's the world's largest ballooning event. In 2015, the festival had more than 955,000 guests and 547 balloon pilots from 17 different countries.

32. NEW YORK

The Adirondack Park in upstate New York was established in 1892 in order to preserve water and timber in the area. Today it covers 6.1 million acres, which is larger than Yosemite, Yellowstone, Glacier, Grand Canyon, and the Great Smoky Mountains National Parks combined, making it the largest park in the contiguous 48 states.

33. NORTH CAROLINA

Asheville is home to Biltmore, the largest house in America. The 250-room mansion was built over six years starting in 1889 by George Vanderbilt as a “country home.”

34. NORTH DAKOTA

The town of Rugby has laid claim to being the geographic center of North America for decades, but now the tiny town of Robinson 85 miles south is trying to usurp them. No matter what happens, it’s still in North Dakota.

35. OHIO

In 1835—just two years after its founding—Ohio's Oberlin College became the first in the United States to admit African American students. The college first admitted women into the baccalaureate program in 1837 (previously they had taken a "ladies course"), and in 1841, Oberlin became the first college to give bachelor's degrees to women in a coeducational program.

36. OKLAHOMA

iStock

The world's first parking meter was invented by Carl C. Magee in Oklahoma City. The first model of the "Park-O-Meter" was displayed in May 1935; the meters charged a nickel an hour and were installed along curbs in July of that year. The first Park-O-Meter, which was placed on the southeast corner of First Street and Robinson Avenue, can these days be seen at the Oklahoma Historical Society.

37. OREGON

At about 1943 feet deep, Crater Lake is the deepest in the United States. The lake, which sits in a caldera created 7700 years ago after the massive eruption of Mount Mazama, is fed mostly by snow; 538 inches fall every year. This means that the lake is very clear—most of the time, visibility extends to 120 feet below the surface, and scientists have reported being able to see as far as 142 feet down [PDF].

38. PENNSYLVANIA

Bethlehem is home to the Moravian Bookshop, the oldest bookstore in the country. Founded by the Moravian church in 1745, it moved to its current location in 1871.

39. RHODE ISLAND

This tiny state’s founder, Roger Williams, was kicked out of Massachusetts for his views on freedom of speech and religion. His views heavily influenced the founding fathers a century later when they incorporated those same ideas into the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

40. SOUTH CAROLINA

Inspired by the creation of the British Museum, the Charleston Museum was founded in 1773 and was America’s first museum. It first opened to the public in 1824 and has been open since then, with a brief pause when the Civil War got in the way.

41. SOUTH DAKOTA

The Crazy Horse memorial, carved into a mountain, was first envisioned in 1947. If and when it is finished, the monument will be 563 feet high, and be surrounded by the campus of the Indian University of North America.

42. TENNESSEE

iStock

This state's Great Smoky Mountains National Park is home to a number of species, including some 1500 black bears—approximately two bears per square mile—240 species of birds, and 84 kinds of reptiles and amphibians. With 30 species of salamanders (including the massive hellbender, which can grow to be more than 2 feet long), it's earned the nickname "Salamander Capital of the World."

43. TEXAS

The state is so unfathomably large that El Paso, on the western border, is closer to San Diego, California than it is to Houston, on the eastern border.

44. UTAH

Sixty percent of people in Utah identify as Mormons, making it the most religiously homogenous state in the U.S. The temple in Salt Lake City took 40 years to build.

45. VERMONT

This state was the last one to get a Walmart, holding out until 1996 and only getting three more in the next 20 years. They still don’t have any Target stores.

46. VIRGINIA

Eight presidents—George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, James Monroe, William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, Zachary Taylor, and Woodrow Wilson—have been born in Virginia, more than in any other state. (Ohio, with seven, comes in second.)

47. WASHINGTON

Boeing’s Everett Site is the largest manufacturing building in the world. Workers arrived in January 1967 and started assembling the first planes as the building was literally constructed around them. The building itself opened on May 1 of that year.

48. WEST VIRGINIA

In 2014, 18-year-old Saira Blair won a seat in the West Virginia House of Delegates in a 63 percent to 30 percent landslide. It made her the youngest elected lawmaker in the country. The student—and fiscal conservative—has to balance her term with college, where she is majoring in economics.

49. WISCONSIN

After printing an ad in the local newspaper looking for people with similar ideas, Alvan E. Bovay planted the seeds for the Republican party in a small schoolhouse in Ripon, with the goal of ending slavery.

50. WYOMING

Before even becoming a state, Wyoming was striking a victory for women’s suffrage: The state's politicians passed a bill giving women the vote when it was a territory back in 1869. Wyoming became the first state in the nation to allow women to vote when it was admitted to the union 21 years later.

Original image
iStock
arrow
Live Smarter
Hate Waiting at Baggage Claim? Here's How to Make Sure Your Suitcase Arrives First
Original image
iStock

Air travel involves plenty of waiting, from standing in long security lines to preparing for takeoff. And even after you land, your trip is stalled until you locate your luggage on the carousel. Luckily for impatient fliers, there are several ways to game the system and ensure a speedy suitcase delivery once you step off the plane, according to Travel + Leisure.

To score true VIP luggage treatment, ask the representative behind the check-in counter if they can attach a “fragile” sticker to your bag. Suitcases with these kinds of labels are often loaded last and unloaded first. (Plus, they receive the type of kid-glove treatment that ultimately helps them last longer.)

Keep in mind, however, that you’ll need a new tag each time you fly. If it looks old, or was issued by a different airline, the crew might not pay attention to it, according to Condé Nast Traveler. Also, consider upping your suitcase game, as quality, hard-shell bags look like they contain delicate or important items. Their appearance—along with the fragile sticker—will inspire baggage handlers to give them special treatment.

Another trick that can shave a few minutes off your wait time is making sure you're the last person to check in, instead of rushing to be first. If you can't resist getting to the airport early, try asking if you can check it at the gate. This could make your bag one of the last on the plane, and thus one of the first taken out. This method isn't surefire, however, as loading and unloading systems vary among flights.

And if all else fails, Thrillist advises that you try upgrading your flight. Some airlines give priority to bags that belong to elite travelers and business class, meaning they’ll be stored separately from other luggage and come out first. Good luck! No matter what happens, at least you can't have it worse than the lady who had to wait 20 years for her bag to show up.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

Original image
20th Century Fox
arrow
entertainment
25 Things You Might Not Know About Home Alone
Original image
20th Century Fox

On November 16, 1990, what appeared to be a fun-filled little family yarn about a kid left to his own devices at Christmastime and forced to fend off a couple of bungling burglars, became an instant classic. Today, no holiday movie marathon is complete without a viewing of Home Alone, the movie that turned Macaulay Culkin into one of the biggest kid stars of all time. And while you may be able to recite its dialogue line for line, here are 25 things you might not know about the John Hughes-penned picture. So settle in and enjoy, ya filthy animals. 

1. WITHOUT UNCLE BUCK, THERE’D BE NO HOME ALONE.

The idea for Home Alone occurred to John Hughes during the making of Uncle Buck, which also starred Macaulay Culkin. Always game to play the precocious one, there’s a scene in which Culkin’s character interrogates a potential babysitter through a mail slot. In Home Alone, Culkin has a similar confrontation with Daniel Stern, this time via a doggie door.

2. THE ROLE OF KEVIN WAS WRITTEN SPECIFICALLY FOR MACAULAY CULKIN.

But that didn't stop director Chris Columbus from auditioning more than 100 other rascally pre-teens for the part. Which really was all for naught, as Culkin nailed the role.

3. MACAULAY WASN’T THE ONLY CULKIN TO APPEAR IN THE FILM.


20th Century Fox

Macaulay;'s younger brother Kieran also landed a part as Kevin’s bed-wetting cousin, Fuller. Though the film marked Kieran’s acting debut, he has since gone on to build an impressive career for himself in movies like The Cider House Rules, Igby Goes Down, and Scott Pilgrim vs. the World.

4. CASTING CULKIN TAUGHT CHRIS COLUMBUS A VERY IMPORTANT LESSON.

Since Home Alone, Columbus (who also wrote the scripts for Gremlins and The Goonies) has gone on to become one of Hollywood’s premier family-friendly moviemakers as the director of Home Alone 2, Mrs. Doubtfire, and two movies in the Harry Potter franchise. But one lesson he learned from Home Alone is that when you agree to work with a kid actor, you’re also agreeing to work with his or her family.

“I was much younger and I was really too naive to think about the family environment as well,” Columbus told The Guardian in 2013. “We didn't know that much about the family at the beginning; as we were shooting, we learned a little more. The stories are hair-raising. I was casting a kid who truly had a troubled family life.” In 1995, Culkin’s parents, who were never married, engaged in a very public—and nasty—legal battle over his fortune. 

5. THE FILM IS A GUINNESS WORLD RECORD HOLDER.

In its opening weekend, Home Alone topped the box office, making $17,081,997 in 1202 theaters. The movie maintained its number one spot for a full 12 weeks and remained in the top 10 until June of the following year. It became the highest grossing film of 1990 and earned a Guinness World Record as the highest-grossing live-action comedy ever domestically.

6. THE MOVIE’S UNPRECEDENTED SUCCESS LED TO ITS TITLE BECOMING A VERB.


20th Century Fox

In his book The Big Picture: Who Killed Hollywood? And Other Essays, two-time Oscar-winning screenwriter William Goldman admitted that the unexpected success of Home Alone contributed a new phrase to the Hollywood lexicon: to be Home Aloned, meaning that other films suffered at the box office because of Home Alone’s long and successful run. “More than one executive said to me, ‘My picture did 40, but it would have done 50 if it hadn’t been Home Aloned,’” wrote Goldman.

7. IT SPAWNED MORE THAN A SEQUEL.

While all of the main, original cast members reprised their roles for Home Alone 2: Lost In New York (with Columbus again directing a script by Hughes), the success of the original led to a full-on franchise, complete with four sequels, three video games, two board games, a novelization, and other kid-friendly merchandise (including the Talkboy). 

8. POLAND LOVES THE MCCALLISTERS.

Showings of Home Alone have become a Christmas tradition in Poland, where the film has aired on national television since the early 1990s. And its popularity has only increased. In 2011 more than five million people tuned in to watch it, making it the most watched show to air during the season. 

9. THE MCCALLISTER HOME HAS BECOME A MAJOR TOURIST ATTRACTION.


A Syn via Flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0

Located at 671 Lincoln Avenue in Winnetka, Illinois, the kitchen, main staircase, and ground-floor landing seen in the film were all shot in this five-bedroom residence. (The dining room and all other first-floor rooms, with the exception of the kitchen, were shot on a soundstage.) In 2012, John and Cynthia Abendshien, who owned the home when it was used as one of the film’s locations, sold the property for $1.585 million.

10. KEVIN’S TREE HOUSE WAS NOT PART OF THE DEAL.

Kevin’s backyard tree house was not originally part of the property. It was constructed specifically for the movie and demolished once filming ended. 

11. ALL OF THE FILM WAS SHOT IN THE CHICAGO AREA.

Though the main plot point is that that McCallister family is in Paris while Kevin’s back home in Illinois, the production was shot entirely within the Chicago area. The scenes supposedly set at Paris-Orly Airport were shot at O’Hare International Airport. And those luxurious business class seats they’re taking to Paris? Those were built on the basketball court of a local high school—the same school where the scene in which Kevin is running through a flooded basement was filmed (the “basement” in question was actually the school’s swimming pool). 

12. ROBERT DE NIRO TURNED DOWN THE ROLE OF HARRY LIME.


Getty Images

As did Jon Lovitz. Then Joe Pesci swept in and made the part his own. Bonus fun fact: The character is a slight homage to Orson Welles. (It was the name of Welles’ character in Carol Reed’s The Third Man.) 

13. JOE PESCI GOT ALL METHOD ON MACAULAY CULKIN.

In order to get the most authentic performance possible, Joe Pesci did his best to avoid Macaulay Culkin on the set so that the young actor would indeed be afraid of him. And no one would blame the young actor for being a bit petrified, as he still bears the physical scar from one accidental altercation. “In the first Home Alone, they hung me up on a coat hook, and Pesci says, ‘I’m gonna bite all your fingers off, one at a time,’” Culkin recalled to Rule Forty Two. “And during one of the rehearsals, he bit me, and it broke the skin.” 

14. PESCI WASN’T USED TO THE WHOLE “FAMILY-FRIENDLY” THING.

Considering that Pesci’s best known for playing the heavy in movies like Raging Bull, Goodfellas, and Casino, it’s understandable that he wasn’t quite used to the whole family-friendly atmosphere on the set of Home Alone—and dropped a few f-bombs as a result of that. Columbus tried to curb Pesci’s four-letter-word tendency by suggesting he use the word “fridge” instead. 

15. DANIEL STERN HAD A FOUR-LETTER WORD SLIP-UP, TOO.


20th Century Fox

And it wasn’t cut out of the film. He utters the word “s***” when attempting to retrieve his shoe through the doggie door (look for it at the 55:27 mark on the DVD). 

16. IN REAL LIFE, HARRY AND MARV MAY NOT HAVE SURVIVED KEVIN’S ATTACK.

BB gun shots to the forehead and groin? A steaming hot iron and can of paint to the face? A flaming blowtorch to the scalp? The Wet Bandits endure an awful lot of violence at the hands of a single eight-year-old. So much so that neither one of them should have been walking—let alone conscious—by the end of the night. In 2012, Dr. Ryan St. Clair diagnosed the likely outcome of their injuries at The Week. While a read-through of the entire article is well worth your time, here are a few of the highlights: That iron should have caused a “blowout fracture,” leading to “serious disfigurement and debilitating double vision if not repaired properly.” And the blowtorch? According to Dr. St. Clair, “The skin and bone tissue on Harry's skull will be so damaged and rotted that his skull bone is essentially dying and will likely require a transplant.” 

17. THE ORNAMENTS THAT MARV STEPS ON WOULD CAUSE THE LEAST AMOUNT OF DAMAGE.

"Walking on ornaments seems pretty insignificant compared to everything else we've seen so far,” said Dr. St. Clair. “If I was Marv, I'd be more concerned about my facial fractures.” Fortunately, the "glass" ornaments in question were actually made of candy. (But just to be on the safe side, Stern wore rubber feet for his barefoot scenes.)

18. THE TARANTULA ON STERN’S FACE? YEP, THAT WAS REAL.


20th Century Fox

At one point, Kevin places a tarantula on Marv’s face. And it was indeed a real spider (Daniel Stern agreed to let it happen—but he’d only allow for one take). What wasn’t real? That blood-curdling scream. In order to not frighten the spider, Stern had to mime the scream and have the sound dubbed in later.

19. JOHN CANDY WRAPPED IN ONE DAY.

But what a long day it was: Twenty-three hours to be exact. Candy was a regular in many of John Hughes’ movies, and Gus Polinski—the polka-playing nice guy he plays in Home Alone—was inspired by his character in Planes, Trains & Automobiles. 

20. KEVIN’S OLDER SISTER IS A JUDO CHAMP.

Two years after appearing in Home Alone, Hillary Wolf—who played Kevin’s older sister Megan—landed the lead in Joan Micklin Silver’s Big Girls Don’t Cry… They Get Even. She also appeared in Home Alone 2, but hasn’t been seen on the big screen since. But there’s a good reason for her absence: In 1996 and 2000, she was a member of the Summer Olympic Judo team for the U.S. 

21. DON’T BOTHER TRYING TO FIND ANGELS WITH FILTHY SOULS.

The Jimmy Cagney-like gangster movie that Kevin channels as his inspiration throughout Home Alone? Don’t bother searching for it on eBay. It’s not real. Nor is its sequel, Angels With Even Filthier Souls, which is featured in Home Alone 2. 

22. OLD MAN MARLEY WASN'T IN THE ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY.

Kevin’s allegedly scary neighbor, who eventually teaches him the importance of family, wasn’t a character in the original script. He was added at the suggestion of Columbus, who thought the film could do with a stronger dose of sentimentality.

23. THE LYRIC OPERA OF CHICAGO BENEFITED FROM THE MOVIE’S SNOWFALL.

When filming of Home Alone wrapped, the production donated some of the artificial snow they had created (the stuff made from wax and plastic) to the Lyric Opera of Chicago. It has since been used in a number of their productions.

24. MARV WAS SUPPOSED TO HAVE GOTTEN A SPINOFF.

Greg Beeman’s 1995 film Bushwhacked, which stars Daniel Stern as a delivery guy on the run after being framed for murder, was originally intended to be a spinoff of Home Alone. The storyline would have been essentially the same: after giving up a life of crime, Marv would have been framed for the same murder.

25. IF YOU BELIEVE THAT ELVIS IS STILL ALIVE, THEN YOU MIGHT BELIEVE THAT HE IS IN HOME ALONE.

No hit movie would be complete without a great little conspiracy theory. And in the case of Home Alone, it’s that Elvis Presley—who (allegedly?) died in 1977—makes a cameo in the film. Yes, that’s right. The King is alive and well. And making a living as a Hollywood extra.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios