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A More Accurate World Map Wins Prestigious Japanese Design Award

To design a map of the world is no easy task. Because maps represent the spherical Earth in 2D form, they cannot help but be distorted, which is why Greenland and Antarctica usually look far more gigantic than they really are, while Africa appears vastly smaller than its true size. The AuthaGraph World Map tries to correct these issues, showing the world closer to how it actually is in all its spherical glory.

Created by Hajime Narukawa at Keio University's Graduate School of Media and Governance in Tokyo, the design just won the grand prize from Japan’s Good Design Award as Spoon & Tamago reports. It beat out over 1000 entries in a variety of categories. 

Unlike the Mercator projection, the 1569 mapping technique that you'd probably recognize from the world maps you saw in school, the continents on the AuthaGraph aren’t lined up straight across—they’re angled in a way that provides a more accurate representation of the distances between them. “AuthaGraph faithfully represents all oceans [and] continents, including the neglected Antarctica,” according to the Good Design Awards, and provides “an advanced precise perspective of our planet.” No longer does Africa look the same size as North America, or Antarctica look like one of the biggest continents (it’s smaller than everything but Europe and Australia).

The map—which is used in Japanese textbooks—can be fit into different shapes without losing its accuracy, and AuthaGraph sells paper assembly kits where you can fold it from a sphere to a cone to a flat map, mimicking the way the projection itself is made.

[h/t Spoon & Tamago]

All images courtesy AuthaGraph.

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General Mills
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Afternoon Map
The Most Popular Thanksgiving Foods in All 50 States, Mapped
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General Mills

Not everyone eats (or even likes) turkey on Thanksgiving. The exact food served at the annual U.S. feast varies from household to household according to personal tastes and, more importantly, region. In the South, for example, stuffing might be made with cornbread, while there’s a good chance that anything served in Minnesota will come in a casserole dish.

To highlight regional Turkey Day tastes, General Mills collected data from top recipe searches on BettyCrocker.com, Pillsbury.com, and the cooking website Tablespoon.com from November 1, 2016 through Thanksgiving Day 2016. They compiled the state-by-state findings into a map so we could see what Americans like to chow down on during the holiday.

It turns out, home chefs in Georgia, South Carolina, Delaware, and North Carolina largely searched for sweet potato dishes, while West Virginians, Ohioans, and Pennsylvanians wanted to make buffalo chicken dip. And oddly enough, the denizens of two landlocked states—Arizona and Wisconsin—sought out shrimp recipes.

Proving that some Thanksgiving desserts are relatively universal, however, residents of six states—including South Dakota, South Carolina, Oklahoma, North Carolina, New Mexico, and New Hampshire—all looked for various types of pie.

Check out the full findings in the map below.

A map by General Mills depicting the most popular Thanksgiving food in each state
General Mills
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Afternoon Map
Map: All 50 States Reimagined as Food Puns
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Pun enthusiasts will recall that we've covered Chris Durso's Foodnited States of America before. Now the project, which was inspired by Durso's young son, is available in map form in the Foodiggity store.


If you can't figure all of these out on the map above, here's the complete list and a larger image of each state's selection.

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