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A More Accurate World Map Wins Prestigious Japanese Design Award

To design a map of the world is no easy task. Because maps represent the spherical Earth in 2D form, they cannot help but be distorted, which is why Greenland and Antarctica usually look far more gigantic than they really are, while Africa appears vastly smaller than its true size. The AuthaGraph World Map tries to correct these issues, showing the world closer to how it actually is in all its spherical glory.

Created by Hajime Narukawa at Keio University's Graduate School of Media and Governance in Tokyo, the design just won the grand prize from Japan’s Good Design Award as Spoon & Tamago reports. It beat out over 1000 entries in a variety of categories. 

Unlike the Mercator projection, the 1569 mapping technique that you'd probably recognize from the world maps you saw in school, the continents on the AuthaGraph aren’t lined up straight across—they’re angled in a way that provides a more accurate representation of the distances between them. “AuthaGraph faithfully represents all oceans [and] continents, including the neglected Antarctica,” according to the Good Design Awards, and provides “an advanced precise perspective of our planet.” No longer does Africa look the same size as North America, or Antarctica look like one of the biggest continents (it’s smaller than everything but Europe and Australia).

The map—which is used in Japanese textbooks—can be fit into different shapes without losing its accuracy, and AuthaGraph sells paper assembly kits where you can fold it from a sphere to a cone to a flat map, mimicking the way the projection itself is made.

[h/t Spoon & Tamago]

All images courtesy AuthaGraph.

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Pop Culture
Doctor Who Is About to Get Its First Female Doctor
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BBC America

BBC America

Nearly six months after current Doctor Who star Peter Capaldi announced that he'd be hanging up his Crombie coat at the end of this year, fans have been speculating about who would be taking over the TARDIS. On Sunday morning, BBC announced that Jodie Whittaker will become the Thirteenth Doctor—the first female lead in the show's history.

That's not the only major change the series will see when its Christmas Special premieres at the end of this year; longtime showrunner Steven Moffat is handing off creative duties to Chris Chibnall, who has written several episodes of the series over the past decade. The teaming of Chibnall and Whittaker will be a familiar one, as the two have spent the past several years working on Broadchurch, which Chibnall created and in which Whittaker stars (its stellar final season is airing on BBC America now).

“I’m beyond excited to begin this epic journey—with Chris and with every Whovian on this planet," Whittaker said in a statement. "It’s more than an honor to play the Doctor. It means remembering everyone I used to be, while stepping forward to embrace everything the Doctor stands for: hope. I can’t wait.”

“After months of lists, conversations, auditions, recalls, and a lot of secret-keeping, we’re excited to welcome Jodie Whittaker as the Thirteenth Doctor," Chibnall added. "I always knew I wanted the Thirteenth Doctor to be a woman and we're thrilled to have secured our number one choice. Her audition for The Doctor simply blew us all away. Jodie is an in-demand, funny, inspiring, super-smart force of nature and will bring loads of wit, strength and warmth to the role. The Thirteenth Doctor is on her way.”

Though Whittaker will make history as the first female Doctor, the idea has been floated in the past. When David Tennant parted ways with his role as the Tenth Doctor in 2008, showrunner Russell Davies said that Catherine Zeta-Jones was his first choice to replace him.

When asked what it feels like to be the first woman Doctor, Whittaker said, "It feels completely overwhelming, as a feminist, as a woman, as an actor, as a human, as someone who wants to continually push themselves and challenge themselves, and not be boxed in by what you’re told you can and can’t be. It feels incredible."

Fortunately, Whittaker already has a few friends in the Doctor Who family who she's expecting to hear from at any minute. "I’m certainly expecting a couple of calls," she admitted. "I’ve got a couple of mates in there. I’m mates with a companion [Arthur Darvill], I’m mates with a trio of Doctors. I know Matt Smith, Chris Eccleston, and obviously David Tennant. Oh! And let’s throw in David Bradley! Four Doctors! So I’m hoping I get some calls of advice."

Whittaker will make her debut in the 2017 Christmas Special, which will mark Capaldi's final episode as the Twelfth Doctor—and he couldn't be more thrilled with his choice of successor.

“Anyone who has seen Jodie Whittaker’s work will know that she is a wonderful actress of great individuality and charm," Capaldi said. "She has above all the huge heart to play this most special part. She’s going to be a fantastic Doctor.”

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