Tonight, Wednesday, October 26, sky-gazers as far south as Pennsylvania may be treated to a sight usually reserved for spectators farther north: the Northern Lights. The phenomenon will likely be visible over Canada, Scandinavia, Scotland, the UK, and the northern U.S., The Daily Mail reports.

Viewers of the Aurora Borealis—the result of charged particles (aka solar wind) clashing with the Earth's upper atmosphere—can thank a solar storm fueled by a hole in the Sun’s outer layer. That same hole was responsible for producing a moderate-strength (G2) geomagnetic storm last month that caused the aurora to glow extra bright. The lights are expected to look even more intense this time around, with the British Geological Survey, Aurorawatch UK, and NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center all forecasting increased chances of witnessing the phenomenon.

The northernmost of the lower 48 states, including South Dakota, Montana, and Washington, will most likely host the best views of the display in the U.S. But residents of lower states like Ohio, Pennsylvania, Indiana, and Illinois will also have a shot at catching a glimpse once the Sun goes down. For live updates on where in the world the light show can be seen, NOAA has you covered.

[h/t Daily Mail]
 
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