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Stephanie Pokorny

Mom Crochets Son an E.T.-Inspired Onesie for Halloween

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Stephanie Pokorny

Using only a crochet hook and lots of brown yarn, Stephanie Pokorny of Mentor, Ohio, created a one-of-a-kind, E.T.-inspired Halloween costume entirely by hand, The Huffington Post reports. The get-up might be referencing a 34-year-old movie, but it was custom-made for a much younger wearer: the crafter's toddler.

Each fall, Pokorny—who describes herself to mental_floss as a "self-proclaimed Halloween addict"—teams up with family members to make a unique costume from scratch. "We live in Ohio and sometimes we have snow on Halloween, so it's the perfect time to bust out the yarn," said Pokorny, whose grandmother taught her to crochet when she was a teenager.

Pokorny’s past Halloween projects have included costumes for her son Jack, who turns two in November. She's crocheted him a Alice in Wonderland-inspired caterpillar outfit and a Clint Eastwood costume, but this year, the crafty mom took a cue from her favorite decade, the 1980s, and knitted the toddler a snug, one-piece ensemble inspired by the titular alien from E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982).

The entire project took Pokorny four days, and she didn’t use a pattern. "I began on a Friday and finished Monday evening, weaving in the last end just before I took and posted the photos [on social media] that night," she told mental_floss. Check out more of Pokorny’s crochet costumes on Facebook and on her Crochetverse site.

[h/t The Huffington Post]

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architecture
One Photographer's Quest to Document Every Frank Lloyd Wright Structure in the World
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iStock

From California’s Marin County Civic Center to the Yokodo Guest House in Ashiya City, Japan, Frank Lloyd Wright’s influence spans countries and continents. Today, 532 of the architect’s original designs remain worldwide—and one photographer is racking up the miles in an attempt to photograph each and every one of them, according to Architectural Digest.

Andrew Pielage is the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation’s unofficial photographer. The Phoenix-based shutterbug got his gig after friends introduced him to officials at Taliesin West, the late designer’s onetime winter home and studio that today houses the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation and Taliesin, the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture.

Higher-ups at Taliesin West allowed Pielage to photograph the property in 2011, and they liked his work so much that they commissioned him for other projects. Since then, Pielage has shot around 50 Wright buildings, ranging from Fallingwater in Mill Run, Pennsylvania, to the Hollyhock House in Los Angeles.

Pielage takes vertical panoramas to “get more of Wright in one image,” and he also prefers to work with natural light to emphasize the way the architect integrated his structures to correspond with nature’s rhythms. While Pielage still has over 400 more FLW projects to go until he's done capturing the icon’s breadth of work, you can check out some of his initial shots below.

[h/t Architectural Digest]

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Courtesy Chronicle Books
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Design
Inside This Pop-Up Book Are a Planetarium, a Speaker, a Decoder Ring, and More
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Courtesy Chronicle Books

Designer Kelli Anderson's new book is for more than just reading. This Book Is a Planetarium is really a collection of paper gadgets. With each thick, card stock page you turn, another surprise pops out.

"This book concisely explains—and actively demonstrates with six functional pop-up paper contraptions—the science at play in our everyday world," the book's back cover explains. It turns out, there's a whole lot you can do with a few pieces of paper and a little bit of imagination.

A book is open to reveal a spiralgraph inside.
Courtesy Chronicle Books

There's the eponymous planetarium, a paper dome that you can use with your cell phone's flashlight to project constellations onto the ceiling. There's a conical speaker, which you can use to amplify a smaller music player. There's a spiralgraph you can use to make geometric designs. There's a basic cipher you can use to encode and decode secret messages, and on its reverse side, a calendar. There's a stringed musical instrument you can play on. All are miniature, functional machines that can expand your perceptions of what a simple piece of paper can become.

The cover of This Book Is a Planetarium
Courtesy Chronicle Books

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