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Look Up Tonight! It's the Super Hunter's Moon

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Sorry to say it, but your view of the Moon won't be as good as it was for ESA astronaut Tim Peake on March 28, 2016, when he captured this image of the Moon setting from the International Space Station. Image credit: ESA/NASA

Look up at the sky tonight, October 16, and you'll be treated not only to a full moon, but a supermoon. And not just any supermoon, but a Super Hunter's Moon!

WHY A FULL MOON IS FULL

Let's go over the fundamentals first. If nothing else, take away from this article the knowledge that the Moon's phases have nothing to do with the Earth's shadow. Yes, it kind of makes sense: the dark crescents, the predictability, and the orbits: one around the Earth, and both around the Sun. Shadows crossing orbs. But when the Earth's shadow crosses the Moon, you get a lunar eclipse.

The Moon's phases are a lot simpler than that. First, the Moon orbits the Earth every 29.5 days. You might have noticed that "moon" and "month" are similar words. That's not by accident. Moreover, the Moon is "tidally locked" with the Earth, which means from down here, we only see one side of the Moon, ever. Keep this in mind.

One half of the Moon is always fully illuminated by the Sun. As it creeps around the Earth over the course of a month, the illuminated area changes. When the Moon is generally opposite the Sun relative to the Earth (i.e. Sun-Earth-Moon), the side we can see is in full sunlight. It's a full moon. When the Moon is between the Sun and the Earth (Sun-Moon-Earth), the far side of the Moon—the half of it we never see—is in full illumination. In other words, the half we do see is receiving no sunlight at all. This is a new moon. (N.b. that there is no "dark side of the Moon." Every side of the Moon gets bathed in sunlight over the course of a revolution.)

The rest of the Moon's phases proceed from these fully lit or totally darkened states of visibility. As the Moon's orbit around the Earth takes it away from the Sun, it is said to be waxing, because from our point of view, the Moon is becoming increasingly full. After crossing the halfway point (the full moon), the visible Moon seems to darken. It is waning.

WHAT'S IN A NAME

Not all full moons are created equal. Sometimes the full moon seems really, really big. Sometimes it seems weirdly small. This is because the Moon's orbit around the Earth is not a perfect circle, but rather, is elliptical. Sometimes it is closer to the Earth than other times. When it is close, it is said to be at perigee. When it is farthest away, it is at apogee. When the Moon is both at perigee and full, you get what is colloquially called a supermoon.

So what about this Hunter's Moon business? That is what some Native Americans called the full moon in October for reasons that must seem obvious. It provided extra light by which to hunt—a vital activity with winter's fast approach. (You might recall last month's harvest moon, whose name has the same rationale as this one: Gather your acorns before snow blankets the forest.)

HOW TO SEE IT

Look up. Other things you'll see: tiny flickering dots that are stars, unless they're moving quickly, because those are likely airplanes or the International Space Station. If they're moving really, really fast, they're meteors. If you see a tiny stationary dot that doesn't flicker, it's probably a planet (or the tip of a cell phone tower). The super hunter's moon will make planet spotting more difficult. Uranus is at opposition this weekend and thus fully illuminated by the Sun from our point of view, but unless you're a first-rate astronomer with heavy duty hardware at your disposal, you won't be able to see it. The full moon above and light pollution below will join forces to wash it out. Even under the best conditions, it's really difficult to find. If you just vaguely point in the direction of the Moon and say, "See that dot? That's planet Uranus," people will probably believe you, though.

One more thing: Because we get a full moon this weekend, Halloween night will have a new moon. In other words, the night sky is going to be really dark: perfect conditions to test out your new clown costume and the response time of the local police department.

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entertainment
10 Surprising Facts About The Babadook
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In 2014, The Babadook came out of nowhere and scared audiences across the globe. Written and directed by Aussie Jennifer Kent, and based on her short film Monster, The Babadook is about a widow named Amelia (played by Kent’s drama schoolmate Essie Davis) who has trouble controlling her young son Samuel (Noah Wiseman), who thinks there’s a monster living in their house. Amelia reads Samuel a pop-up book, Mister Babadook, and Samuel manifests the creature into a real-life monster. The Babadook may be the villain, but the film explores the pitfalls of parenting and grief in an emotional way. 

“I never approached this as a straight horror film,” Kent told Complex. “I always was drawn to the idea of grief, and the suppression of that grief, and the question of, how would that affect a person? ... But at the core of it, it’s about the mother and child, and their relationship.”

Shot on a $2 million budget, the film grossed more than $10.3 million worldwide and gained an even wider audience via streaming networks. Instead of creating Babadook out of CGI, a team generated the images in-camera, inspired by the silent films of Georges Méliès and Lon Chaney. Here are 10 things you might not have known about The Babadook (dook, dook).

1. THE NAME “BABADOOK” WAS EASY FOR A CHILD TO INVENT.

Jennifer Kent told Complex that some people thought the creature’s name sounded “silly,” which she agreed with. “I wanted it to be like something a child could make up, like ‘jabberwocky’ or some other nonsensical name,” she explained. “I wanted to create a new myth that was just solely of this film and didn’t exist anywhere else.”

2. JENNIFER KENT WAS WORRIED PEOPLE WOULD JUDGE THE MOTHER.

Amelia isn’t the best mother in the world—but that’s the point. “I’m not a parent,” Kent told Rolling Stone, “but I’m surrounded by friends and family who are, and I see it from the outside … how parenting seems hard and never-ending.” She thought Amelia would receive “a lot of flak” for her flawed parenting, but the opposite happened. “I think it’s given a lot of women a sense of reassurance to see a real human being up there,” Kent said. “We don’t get to see characters like her that often.”

3. KENT AND ESSIE DAVIS TONED DOWN THE CONTENT FOR THE KID.

Noah Wiseman was six years old when he played Samuel. Kent and Davis made sure he wasn’t present for the more horrific scenes, like when Amelia tells Samuel she wishes he was the one who died, not her husband. “During the reverse shots, where Amelia was abusing Sam verbally, we had Essie yell at an adult stand-in on his knees,” Kent told Film Journal. “I didn’t want to destroy a childhood to make this film—that wouldn’t be fair.”

Kent explained a “kiddie version” of the plot to Wiseman. “I said, ‘Basically, Sam is trying to save his mother and it’s a film about the power of love.’”

4. THE FILM IS ALSO ABOUT “FACING OUR SHADOW SIDE.”

IFC Films

Kent told Film Journal that “The Babadook is a film about a woman waking up from a long, metaphorical sleep and finding that she has the power to protect herself and her son.” She noted that everybody has darkness to face. “Beyond genre and beyond being scary, that’s the most important thing in the film—facing our shadow side.”

5. THE FILM SCARED THE HELL OUT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE EXORCIST.

In an interview with Uproxx, William Friedkin—director of The Exorcist—said The Babadook was one of the best and scariest horror films he’d ever seen. He especially liked the emotional aspect of the film. “It’s not only the simplicity of the filmmaking and the excellence of the acting not only by the two leads, but it’s the way the film works slowly but inevitably on your emotions,” he said.

6. AN ART DEPARTMENT ASSISTANT SCORED THE ROLE AS THE BABADOOK.

Tim Purcell worked in the film’s art department but then got talked into playing the titular character after he acted as the creature for some camera tests. “They realized they could save some money, and have me just be the Babadook, and hence I became the Babadook,” Purcell told New York Magazine. “In terms of direction, it was ‘be still a lot,’” he said.

7. THE MOVIE BOMBED IN ITS NATIVE AUSTRALIA.

Even though Kent shot the film in Adelaide, Australians didn’t flock to the theaters; it grossed just $258,000 in its native country. “Australians have this [built-in] aversion to seeing Australian films,” Kent told The Cut. “They hardly ever get excited about their own stuff. We only tend to love things once everyone else confirms they’re good … Australian creatives have always had to go overseas to get recognition. I hope one day we can make a film or work of art and Australians can think it’s good regardless of what the rest of the world thinks.”

8. YOU CAN OWN A MISTER BABADOOK BOOK (BUT IT WILL COST YOU). 

IFC Films

In 2015, Insight Editions published 6200 pop-up books of Mister Babadook. Kent worked with the film’s illustrator, Alexander Juhasz, who created the book for the movie. He and paper engineer Simon Arizpe brought the pages to life for the published version. All copies sold out but you can find some Kent-signed ones on eBay, going for as much as $500.

9. THE BABADOOK IS A GAY ICON.

It started at the end of 2016, when a Tumblr user started a jokey thread about how he thought the Babadook was gay. “It started picking up steam within a few weeks,” Ian, the Tumblr user, told New York Magazine, “because individuals who I presume are heterosexual kind of freaked out over the assertion that a horror movie villain would identify as queer—which I think was the actual humor of the post, as opposed to just the outright statement that the Babadook is gay.” In June, the Babadook became a symbol for Gay Pride month. Images of the character appeared everywhere at this year's Gay Pride Parade in Los Angeles.

10. DON'T HOLD YOUR BREATH FOR A SEQUEL.

Kent, who owns the rights to The Babadook, told IGN that, despite the original film's popularity, she's not planning on making any sequels. “The reason for that is I will never allow any sequel to be made, because it’s not that kind of film,” she said. “I don’t care how much I’m offered, it’s just not going to happen.”

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Space
NASA Is Posting Hundreds of Retro Flight Research Videos on YouTube
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Bruce Weaver / Stringer / Getty Images

If you’re interested in taking a tour through NASA history, head over to the YouTube page of the Armstrong Flight Research Center, located at Edwards Air Force Base, in southern California. According to Motherboard, the agency is in the middle of posting hundreds of rare aircraft videos dating back to the 1940s.

In an effort to open more of its archives to the public, NASA plans to upload 500 historic films to YouTube over the next few months. More than 300 videos have been published so far, and they range from footage of a D-558 Skystreak jet being assembled in 1947 to a clip of the first test flight of an inflatable-winged plane in 2001. Other highlights include the Space Shuttle Endeavour's final flight over Los Angeles and a controlled crash of a Boeing 720 jet.

The research footage was available to the public prior to the mass upload, but viewers had to go through the Dryden Aircraft Movie Collection on the research center’s website to see them. The current catalogue on YouTube is much easier to browse through, with clear playlist categories like supersonic aircraft and unmanned aerial vehicles. You can get a taste of what to expect from the page in the sample videos below.

[h/t Motherboard]

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