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Staten Island Ferry Octopus Disaster Memorial Museum/Facebook
Staten Island Ferry Octopus Disaster Memorial Museum/Facebook

Memorial to Fake Octopus Attack Appears in NYC

Staten Island Ferry Octopus Disaster Memorial Museum/Facebook
Staten Island Ferry Octopus Disaster Memorial Museum/Facebook

A newly-erected memorial in lower Manhattan pays tribute to the greatest tragedy you’ve never heard of. That’s because The Staten Island Ferry Disaster, in which a giant octopus dragged the steam ferry Cornelius G. Kolff and its passengers to the depths of New York Harbor, never actually happened. The story is part of a tongue-in-cheek hoax concocted by artist Joe Reginella, This Is Colossal reports.

In addition to the bronze memorial depicting a sinking ship wrapped in the tentacles of a massive octopus, Reginella created a website commemorating the event. The page reads:

"On its way with nearly 400 hundred people, mostly on their way to work, the disappearance of the Cornelius G. Kolff remains both one of New York’s most horrific maritime tragedies and perhaps its most intriguing mystery. Eye witness accounts describe 'large tentacles' which 'pulled' the ferry beneath the surface only a short distance from its destination at Whitehall Terminal in Lower Manhattan. Nobody on board survived and only small pieces of wreckage have been found…strangely with large 'suction cup-shaped' marks on them."

The fictional event occurred on November 22, 1963, notable as the date of John F. Kennedy’s assassination (which would explain why the disaster didn’t gain more media coverage). Fliers handed out by Reginella’s team advertise a non-existent Staten Island Ferry Disaster Memorial Museum—the directions make it clear it’s only accessible by ferry. He even produced a brief “documentary” about the tragic day.

As photos on the memorial museum’s Facebook page show, not everyone gets the joke right away: Several somber passersby have been photographed paying their respects.

[h/t This Is Colossal]

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The First-Ever Troop of Homeless Girl Scouts Just Crushed Their Cookie Sales Goal
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Selling 32,500 boxes of cookies in a single week would be noteworthy for any team of Girl Scouts, but it's an especially sweet achievement for Troop 6000: The New York City-based chapter is the first-ever Girl Scout troop composed entirely of children living in homeless shelters.

According to NBC News, this season marked the first time the troop took part in the organization's annual cookie sale tradition. In early April, they received exclusive permission to set up shop inside the Kellogg's Café in Union Square. They kicked off their inaugural stand sale aiming to sell at least 6000 boxes of cookies: At the end of six days, they had sold more than 32,500.

Some customers waited in line an hour to purchase boxes from the history-making young women. Others gave their money directly to the troop, collectively donating over $15,000 to fund trips and activities. After purchasing their cookies, customers could also buy special Girl Scout cookie-inspired menu items from the Kellogg's store, with all proceeds going to Troop 6000.

The troop formed in 2016 as a collaboration between the Girl Scouts of Greater New York, Mayor de Blasio, and the city Department of Homeless Services. Meetings are held in shelters across the city, and many of the troop leaders, often mothers of the scouts, are homeless women themselves. About 40 percent of New York's homeless population are children, and Troop 6000 had to expand last summer to accommodate a flood of new recruits. Today, there are about 300 girls enrolled in the program.

[h/t NBC News]

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11 Fast Facts About the New York City Marathon
Drew Angerer/Getty Images
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Thousands of runners will converge on New York City to race the New York City Marathon on Sunday. Here’s everything you need to know about Gotham’s most iconic road race.

1. THE RACE'S MASTERMIND JUST WANTED TO IMPROVE HIS TENNIS GAME.

When Fred Lebow first laced up his shoes, he didn’t set out to help turn distance running into a national craze. He just wanted to up his stamina when he played tennis. He fell in love with running, though, and in 1970 he organized a marathon in Central Park. With a total budget of $1000—$300 of which came out of Lebow’s own pocket—Lebow gathered a small pack of runners to pound 26.2 miles’ worth of loops in the park on September 13, 1970. 

2. THAT FIRST GROUP STRUGGLED A BIT. 

Lebow’s first race featured a field of 127 runners, but only 55 of them managed to complete the course. Gary Muhrcke won the first race with a time of 2:31:39. Muhrcke’s feat is all the more impressive because he had worked the previous night as a firefighter in Far Rockaway, Queens. In 2009 he told Runner’s World that he was tired and nearly bagged the race entirely: “I had called my wife at about 8:30 in the morning and said, ‘You know, I don't really want to go [to Central Park], I think I'm going to come home and take it easy.’ I don't want to run a marathon on September 13 [with] 85 degrees possible. I heard a disappointment in her voice, because we had three little children. I said, ‘Alright, we'll go, let's go, pick me up, we'll go.’" 

3. ONLY ONE WOMAN COMPETED IN THE FIRST EVENT.

The vast majority of those first 127 runners were men. In fact, there was only one woman in the race! She became ill during the run and never crossed the finish line. 

4. A REVOLUTION BEGAN TWO YEARS LATER. 


By Steven Pisano - Flickr, CC BY 2.0, Wikimedia Commons

Why were there so few women in that first race? Blame running’s old governing body, the Amateur Athletic Union. The AAU had long banned women from running marathons; Runner’s World noted that part of the justification for this ban came from junk science that indicated female distance runners were prone to infertility. In 1971, the AAU agree to allow women to run the distance if their race start was staggered 10 minutes away from the men’s race or from a different line.

The plan for the 1972 race was to have the six women in the field take off from the starting line 10 minutes before their male counterparts. However, when the women’s gun sounded, instead of taking off, the six runners—led by Boston Marathon champ Nina Kuscsik—sat down on the starting line. For 10 minutes, they held signs jeering the AAU with slogans like “Hey AAU, this is 1972. Wake up.” 

When the gun sounded for the men’s race to begin, the women got up and ran. The protest cost them a 10-minute penalty, but it was a major victory in women’s effort to run the same races as men and changed running forever. Last year, more than 21,000 women finished the New York City Marathon. 

5. THE RACE VENTURED OUT OF CENTRAL PARK IN 1976. 

The United States celebrated its bicentennial in 1976, and everyone was looking for a way to ride the national wave of patriotic sentiment, including local runner George Spitz. Spitz thought that taking the race out of its looping course in Central Park and running it through all five of the city’s boroughs would be a great way to harness some local pride. He had run the Boston Marathon, and he reportedly asked his friends, “If Boston can have a marathon on the city roads, why not New York?” 

Spitz doggedly worked to get the support of Mayor Abraham D. Beame and raised the funds necessary to close down the streets. That first cross-city race was a smashing success, and the course has passed through all five boroughs ever since. 

6. IT'S GOTTEN QUITE A BIT MORE EXPENSIVE.


Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The entry fee for the 1970 marathon was just $1. It’s safe to say the price has outpaced inflation in the last several decades. U.S. residents running in the 2017 marathon paid an entry fee of $295 apiece, while non-residents paid $358. 

7. THE SPOILS HAVE GOTTEN BETTER, TOO.

When your entry fee is just a buck, you can’t afford to be too lavish with the race prizes. According to race organizers, the top runners in 1970 received “inexpensive wristwatches and recycled baseball and bowling trophies.” It’s gotten a little richer since then. For this year’s race, the total prize purse is $825,000, with the fastest man and woman running away with $100,000 apiece. 

8. WHEELCHAIR RACERS GOT THEIR OWN DIVISION IN 2000.


Michael Reaves/Getty Images

The 2000 race marked the first year that wheelchair racers had their own formal, competitive division following 20 years of racing as an exhibition event. That first formal race went to Kamel Ayari in a time of 1:53:50, and the division has only gotten faster since then. The current course record belongs to Australian Kurt Fearnley, who roared through all five boroughs in 1:29:22 in 2007.

9. THE FIELD HAS GROWN OVER THE YEARS. 

Lebow only found 127 runners for the 1970 race, but the 2017 edition of the marathon will include about 50,000 racers.

10. RUNNERS RAISE A SERIOUS PILE OF MONEY FOR CHARITY.


Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Many runners are doing more than just getting in a good workout—they’re also raising money for a good cause. The 2014 running of the marathon helped raise a record $34.5 million for various charitable causes. One of these charities is named for Lebow, who passed away in 1994 following a fight with cancer. Since 1995, the charity that bears his name, Fred’s Team, has raised more than $70 million for New York’s Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. 

11. THE RACE HAS ONLY BEEN CANCELED ONCE. 

Since 1970, the only marathon that didn’t go off as planned was the 2012 running. In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, Mayor Michael Bloomberg initially insisted that the race would go on as planned before pressure from other local leaders led him to cancel the marathon. Some disappointed runners gathered in Central Park to run their own unsanctioned race, while others volunteered to visit hard-hit Staten Island to lend a hand to recovery efforts.

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