Pest Professionals
Pest Professionals

The Death Star of Wasp Nests Found in English Attic

Pest Professionals
Pest Professionals

Home renovations can turn up some strange things, but a family in the UK found something slightly more alarming than mold or a leaky roof. The Pipewell, England residents discovered a 3-foot-wide nest made by wasps that had taken up permanent residence in the attic of their new home, the BBC reports.

Pest Professionals

According to the Northampton Chronicle & Echo, a property that had sat unoccupied for years was once home to some 10,000 wasp squatters. Undisturbed by human activity, the wasps constructed a massive sphere connected to the outside by a long, "intricate" tunnel.

Pest Professionals

The discovery was made by exterminators who had been called in to treat a woodworm infestation and subsequently discovered a much bigger issue when the homeowner asked them to have a look at the massive orb in the attic. While not quite world record material—that honor belongs to a New Zealand nest found in 1963 measuring 12 feet long and 5 feet in diameter—it was still enough to cause a temporary case of buyer’s remorse.

Gary Wilkinson, who owns the pest control business Pest Professionals, told the Chronicle that the nest was an impressive feat of insect engineering.

“Although you wouldn't want it in your own loft, you have to say it's a very impressive and in its own way a very beautiful thing,” he said.

[h/t BBC]

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Here's a Brilliantly Simple Way to Organize the Food Container Lids Taking Over Your Cabinets
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iStock

You likely have spots in your kitchen for pots, glasses, and plates, but when it comes to food containers, organization gets complicated. Maybe you let them float loose in a giant bin, or tuck them into any free corner you can find in your cabinets. Either way, finding a matching lid for your bottom half may take longer than it should when it finally comes time to store your leftovers.

Luckily, there's a better way. This simple organizer spotted by Food & Wine keeps storage lids separated by size, saving you minutes otherwise spent tearing apart your kitchen.

The Linus Lid Organizer has three compartments: one for up to 12 large lids, and two for up to 13 small lids each. The lightweight plastic item covers an area of 11 inches by 7.5 inches, which means it can fit in your cabinets, on your counter, or on top of your fridge without taking up too much space. And at just $15, it's worth the price—especially if you end up buying a new set of storage containers every year when you misplace one too many lids.

Container for storage lids.
Container Store

You can purchase the Linus Lid Organizer online from the Container Store. For more kitchen organization hacks, check out our list of ways to keep the space beneath your sink neat and tidy.

[h/t Food & Wine]

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Bright Idea: Save Money By Swapping Out Your Light Bulbs
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iStock

Not many people stop to think about how many light bulbs they have in their home. Chances are, their costs can add up. And if you’re still relying primarily on old-style, incandescent glass bulbs, you’re effectively burning money every time you turn one on.

If you want to lower your utility bill this summer and beyond, consider taking a block of time one afternoon to switch out your energy-gobbling bulbs for LED (light-emitting diode) replacements. According to USA Today, it’s possible to save up to 10 percent on your energy expenses with the upgrade. (Depending, of course, on how often you use indoor lights, exterior flood lamps, and etc.) LEDs need only a fraction of the electricity a conventional bulb uses: A 60-watt equivalent uses 8.5 watts in order to give you the same illumination. A single bulb may cost just $1 a year to operate.

There are other benefits. While LEDs typically cost more up front, they last 25 times longer; they emit much less heat during operation; and because they're made with epoxy lenses and not glass, they’re less prone to breakage.

If you’re willing to invest a little more money, Smart LED bulbs that are equipped with Wi-Fi can be set on timers and work with sensors so the light goes off and on depending on room traffic. Smart bulb starter kits start at around $70.

Not in the mood for a complete socket-to-socket overhaul? Pick five of your most-used lighting fixtures in your home and make sure they’re LED-equipped. You can expect to save $50 to $75 a year on your electricity bill.

[h/t USA Today]

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