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Baltimore Elementary School Replaces Detention With Meditation

Sitting still with a clear mind is a difficult task for most adults to accomplish. For children, it can be especially challenging, but one elementary school in Baltimore has chosen it as their primary mode of discipline. According to Well + Good, Robert W. Coleman Elementary School has done away with detention in favor of mindful mediation.

Past research has shown that punishing kids with detention does little to improve their behavior in the long term. The faculty at Robert W. Coleman Elementary witnessed this ineffectiveness firsthand and decided to make some changes. Instead of being sent to the principal’s office, kids who act up now pay a visit to the school’s Mindful Moment Room.

The room is a collaboration between the school and the Holistic Life Foundation, a local nonprofit that offers yoga and mindfulness classes to the community. When they arrive, students are asked to sit in silence and quiet their minds. They might focus on their breathing or practice some other mental exercises that encourage mindfulness. The idea is that misbehaving kids will train themselves to calm down during stressful or hyperactive moments instead of going to a place where they might be further distracted.

The benefits of meditation have been widely documented. Regular meditation has been found to reduce stress, boost brain function, and even help alleviate pain. The meditation initiative has been in effect at Robert W. Coleman for a little over a year, and teachers can already see the results: No child has been suspended since the program launched. That outcome could appeal to a lot of districts looking to do away with suspension in their own schools.

[h/t Well+Good]

All images: Holistic Life Foundation/Instagram

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BBC
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entertainment
Pablo, a Groundbreaking New BBC Series, Teaches Kids About Autism
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BBC

Autism spectrum disorder affects one in 68 kids in the U.S., but there’s still a lot of confusion surrounding the nature of the condition and what it feels like to have it. As BuzzFeed reports, a new British children’s program aims to teach viewers about autism while showing kids on the spectrum characters and stories to which they can relate.

Pablo, which premiered on the BBC’s kids’ network CBeebies earlier this month, follows a 5-year-old boy as he navigates life with autism. The show uses two mediums: At the start of an episode, Pablo is played by a live actor and faces everyday scenarios, like feeling overstimulated by a noisy birthday party. When he’s working out the conflict in his head, Pablo is depicted as an animated doodle accompanied by animal friends like Noa the dinosaur and Llama the llama.

Each character illustrates a different facet of autism spectrum disorder: Noa loves problem-solving but has trouble reading facial expression, while Llama notices small details and likes repeating words she hears. On top of demonstrating the diversity of autism onscreen, the show depends on individuals with autism behind the scenes as well. Writers with autism contribute to the scripts and all of the characters are voiced by people with autism.

“It’s more than television,” the show’s creator Gráinne McGuinness said in a short documentary about the series. “It’s a movement that seeks to build awareness internationally about what it might be like to see the world from the perspective of someone with autism.”

Pablo can be watched in the UK on CBeebies or globally on the network's website.

[h/t BuzzFeed]

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Animals
These Mobile Libraries Roaming Zimbabwe Are Pulled By Donkeys
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The people behind the Rural Libraries and Resources Development Program (RLRDP) believe you shouldn’t have to travel far to access good reading material. That’s why they have donkeys do a lot of the traveling for the people they help. According to inhabitat, RLRDP manages 15 donkey-powered library carts that deliver books to communities without libraries of their own.

The organization was founded in 1990 with the mission of bringing libraries to rural parts of Zimbabwe. Five years later, they started hitching up donkeys to carts packed with books. Each mobile library can hold about 1200 titles, and 12 of the 15 carts are filled exclusively with books for kids. The donkeys can transport more than just paperbacks: Each two-wheeled cart has space for a few riders, and three of them are outfitted with solar panels that power onboard computers. While browsing the internet or printing documents, visitors to the library can use the solar energy to charge their phones.

Donkeys pulling a cart

Carts usually spend a day in the villages they serve, and that short amount of time is enough to make a lasting impact. RLRDP founder Dr. Obadiah Moyo wrote in a blog post, “The children explore the books, sharing what they’ve read, and local storytellers from the community come to bring stories to life. It really is a day to spread the concept of reading and to develop the reading culture we are all working towards.”

Kids getting books from a cart.

About 1600 individuals benefit from each cart, and Moyo says schools in the areas they visit see improvement in students. The donkey-pulled libraries are only part of what RLRDP does: The organization also trains rural librarians, installs computers in places without them, and delivers books around Zimbabwe via bicycle—but the pack animals are hard to top. Moyo writes, “When the cart is approaching a school, the excitement from the children is wonderful to see as they rush out to greet it.”

[h/t inhabitat]

All images courtesy of Rural Libraries and Resources Development Program

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