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Polaroid
Polaroid

Polaroid Introduces Instant, Touchscreen Franken-Camera

Polaroid
Polaroid

A number of manufacturers have been attempting to solve a puzzle that has plagued the digital camera industry since the smartphone came of age: how to convince consumers they need a separate device to take pictures.

Recently, Leica unveiled a series of colorful instant cameras that can develop film on the spot. The move was a fairly clear homage to Polaroid, which became world-famous for its instant camera and the ability to print stiff, distinctively gauzy photos on demand. Now Polaroid is attempting to outdo its competition with the Snap Touch, a camera that blends old-school features with the one must-have component of the modern day: a touchscreen.

Polaroid

Like the new Leica Sofort, the Polaroid Snap Touch comes in variety of snazzy colors. Unlike the Leica, users can opt for the 3.5-inch touchscreen instead of a viewfinder to frame their 13 megapixel photos. Prints will roll out on a 2-inch by 3-inch proprietary color photo paper that’s also waterproof. To further guarantee you won’t have to juggle devices, the Snap Touch can also shoot high-definition video.

For printing enthusiasts, the camera’s coolest feature may be analog in nature: photos are printed using Polaroid’s ZINK Zero, a process that uses heat to activate color crystals pre-printed on the paper.

The camera will retail for $179.99, with packs of paper starting at $9.99 for a 20-pack. Polaroid is now taking pre-orders

[h/t SlashGear]

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Harry Trimble
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Design
Delightful Photo Series Celebrates Britain’s Municipal Trash Cans
Harry Trimble
Harry Trimble

Not all trash cans are alike. In the UK, few know this better than Harry Trimble, the brains behind #govbins, a photo project that aims to catalog all the trash can designs used by local governments across Britain.

Trimble, a 29-year-old designer based in South London, began the series in 2016, when he noticed the variation in trash can design across the cities he visited in the UK. While most bins are similar sizes and shapes, cities make trash cans their own with unique graphics and unusual colors. He started to photograph the cans he happened to see day-to-day, but the project soon morphed beyond that. Now, he tries to photograph at least one new bin a week.

A bright blue trash can reads ‘Knowsley Council: Recycle for Knowsley.’
Knowsley Village, England

“I got impatient,” Trimble says in an email to Mental Floss. “Now there’s increasingly more little detours and day trips” to track down new bin designs, he says, “which my friends, family and workmates patiently let me drag them on.” He has even pulled over on the road just to capture a new bin he spotted.

So far, he’s found cans that are blue, green, brown, black, gray, maroon, purple, and red. Some are only one color, while others feature lids of a different shade than the body of the can. Some look very modern, with minimalist logos and city website addresses, Trimble describes, “while others look all stately with coats of arms and crests of mythical creatures.”

A black trash can features an 'H' logo.
Hertsmere, England

A blue trash can reads ‘South Ribble Borough Council: Forward with South Ribble.’
South Ribble, England

A green trash can with a crest reads ‘Trafford Council: Food and Garden Waste Only.’
Trafford, Greater Manchester, England

Trimble began putting his images up online in 2017, and recently started an Instagram to show off his finds.

For now, he’s “more than managing” his one-can-a-week goal. See the whole series at govbins.uk.

All images by Harry Trimble

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iStock
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Live Smarter
GoPro Will Let You Trade in Your Old Digital Camera for One of Their Cool New Ones
iStock
iStock

If your camera is aging, GoPro just gave you a great incentive to trade it in for a new model. The company has launched a buyback program that discounts its latest models if you send in your old camera, according to TechCrunch.

If you participate in the GoPro TradeUp program, the company will lop $50 off the price of the new GoPro HERO6 Black and $100 off the price of the Fusion, both released in late 2017. The offer applies to any digital camera—GoPro or not. Now might be a good time to offload that digital point-and-shoot you’ve been sitting on. (It does have to have an original retail value of at least $100.)

GoPro tried a similar initiative in 2017, giving customers 60 days to send in older GoPro models and get a discount on new models. Almost 12,000 customers answered the call. Now, the company is bringing it back with no end date, and the program will now accept any digital camera, whether GoPro-made it or not. “Dented, dinged, destroyed—no problem, we’ll take it,” the site promises.

If you’re already looking to get a new camera and want to dispose of your old one properly, this is a good way to do it. According to the company, “returned cameras will be recycled responsibly via zero landfill and recycling methods appropriate to material type.”

When you order one of the two available GoPro models through the TradeUp program, the company will direct you to dust off your old camera and send it in, with shipping costs covered. Once GoPro receives your old camera, it will send you the discounted new one.

With the discounts, a HERO6 Black would cost $350, and the 360°-shooting Fusion would cost $600.

[h/t TechCrunch]

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