Watch the World's Largest Elevator Carry Ships Over a Dam

China's massive Three Gorges Dam is 600 feet tall and home to what is probably the world's largest elevator. The impressive feat of engineering can lift up to 6.7 million pounds, although it generally does not lift more than 3000 deadweight tons at a time.

As seen in the video below (spotted by Gizmodo), large ships enter the loading dock filled with water, and then the lift carries them to the top or back down in about 40 minutes. It's estimated that the lift will get an extra 6 million tons of goods through the dam each year.

While dams are useful for controlling the flow of water and generating power, drastically changing the water heights on each side of the dam can make getting ships across a challenge. Most dams have adopted a lock system that can slowly get ships across by locking the boats in chambers and adding or removing water.

Three Gorges Dam also has a lock system in place, but that system has two series of ship locks that consist of five stages each, which can take a while. The long process takes about four hours, which is a lot longer than a (relatively) quick trip in an elevator.

[h/t Gizmodo]

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Finally! Windows Notepad Is Getting an Update for the First Time in Years
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While some of Window's core programs have evolved dramatically over the years, or disappeared all together, Notepad has remained pretty basic. But as The Verge reports, the text-editing app is about to get a little fancier: Microsoft is updating it for the first time in years.

Since it debuted in 1985, Notepad has become a popular platform for writing out code. One common complaint from programmers working in non-Windows coding language is that Notepad doesn't format line breaks properly, resulting in jumbled, messy text. Now, both Unix/Linux line endings (LF) and Macintosh line endings (CR) are supported in Notepad, making it even more accessible to developers.

For the first time, users can zoom text by holding ctrl and scrolling the mouse wheel. They can also delete the last word in their document by pressing ctrl+backspace. On top of all that, the new update comes with a wrap-around find-and-replace feature, a default status bar with line and column numbers, and improved performance when handling large files.

The arrow keys will be easier to navigate as well. You can now use the arrow keys to deselect text before moving the cursor. And if you ever want to look up a word online, Microsoft will allow you to connect directly to Bing through the app.

The new Notepad update will be made available first to Windows Insiders through Windows 10 Insider Preview, then to everyone on the forthcoming update, codenamed Redstone 5, likely later this year.

[h/t The Verge]

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A Samsung Messaging Bug Might Be Texting Random Contacts Your Private Photos
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If you've been meaning to purge your phone of embarrassing or private photos, do it sooner rather than later. According to Gizmodo, some Samsung users have reported a bug that sends their images to random people in their contacts without their permission.

Complaints began popping up on web forums in the past week. The apparent bug isn't always texting out one or two photos from the user's stream: In some cases, it's exporting their entire gallery. Others have reported their phones sending scheduled text messages too early.

The glitch leaves no trace of shared data in the phone's messaging app. Unless the texts or photos end up with someone who's kind enough to reach out, there's no way of knowing it happened unless you check the log files for your device's account. This problem has been reported on Galaxy S9, Galaxy S9+, Note 8 phones.

Many of the incidents seem to be affecting phones with T-Mobile, a carrier that recently rolled out updates with their RCS "advanced messaging" service. Multiple Samsung bugs have been reported since the change, mainly connected to the Samsung Messaging app.

Samsung tells Gizmodo they are aware of the reports and are looking into them, but has yet to come out with an official statement warning users of the bug.

Until the company comes up with a fix, there are some steps you can take to protect yourself, as TechCrunch points out. Head to the app settings in your Galaxy phone and make sure Samsung Messages can no longer access your storage. This means you won't be able to send any stored data, like photos or saved messages, through text. In the meantime, you can switch to a third-party messaging app like WhatsApp, Signal, or Facebook Messenger to send all the photos you want to the right people.

[h/t Gizmodo]

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