Paqui Chips
Paqui Chips

The Spiciest Chip in the World is Only Sold One at a Time

Paqui Chips
Paqui Chips

If chili cooking competitions and hot sauce festivals have taught us anything, it's that people love when their treats bring the heat. The latest offering in that category: the Carolina Reaper Madness chip, considered the spiciest tortilla chip in the world and said to be so hot that each package only contains a single chip.

The Paqui chips product is individually wrapped in red packaging that sports an illustration of the Grim Reaper. To complete the theme, the wrapped chip is then housed in a red coffin-shaped cardboard.

"We're always looking to push the limits to find fun ways for our fans and consumers to engage with us," Jeff Day, Brand Manager of Paqui Chips, told Mashable. "When we decided that we wanted to make the world's hottest chip, we first said, well, we need to find the world's hottest pepper."

A single chip might seem like a measly snack, but the company argues that most people will have trouble even finishing it. As the name implies, the spiciest chip gets its spiciness from the world's hottest pepper: the Carolina Reaper Pepper. These bright red, wrinkly peppers are so hot that they can lead to a host of health problems like vomiting, seizures, and shortness of breath. To add to this kick, the chip also comes with ghost pepper and chipotle seasoning. The fiery concoction took Paqui Chips and Chef Smokin' Ed Currie several months to perfect.

"It's the hottest chip you'll ever have, I can guarantee you that," Currie said. "After you eat that one chip, trust me, you're not looking to dig back into the bag and have a second one. So, one chip is what we created to have the experience."

If you'd like to try the chip yourself, you can snag one for $4.99 on Paqui's website. The sellers recommend that adventurous eaters chase the chip with ice cream, milk, yogurt, or honey—water will just make it worse.

[h/t Mashable]

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What Do Morticians Do With the Blood They Take Out of Dead Bodies?
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iStock

Zoe-Anne Barcellos:

The blood goes down the sink drain, into the sewer system.

I am not a mortician, but I work for a medical examiner/coroner. During an autopsy, most blood is drained from the decedent. This is not on purpose, but a result of gravity. Later a mortician may or may not embalm, depending on the wishes of the family.

Autopsies are done on a table that has a drain at one end; this drain is placed over a sink—a regular sink, with a garbage disposal in it. The blood and bodily fluids just drain down the table, into the sink, and down the drain. This goes into the sewer, like every other sink and toilet, and (usually) goes to a water treatment plant.

You may be thinking that this is biohazardous waste and needs to be treated differently. [If] we can’t put oil, or chemicals (like formalin) down the drains due to regulations, why is blood not treated similarly? I would assume because it is effectively handled by the water treatment plants. If it wasn’t, I am sure the regulations would be changed.

Now any items that are soiled with blood—those cannot be thrown away in the regular trash. Most clothing worn by the decedent is either retained for evidence or released with the decedent to the funeral home—even if they were bloody.

But any gauze, medical tubing, papers, etc. that have blood or bodily fluids on them must be thrown away into a biohazardous trash. These are lined with bright red trash liners, and these are placed in a specially marked box and taped closed. These boxes are stacked up in the garage until they are picked up by a specialty garbage company. I am not sure, but I am pretty sure they are incinerated.

Additionally anything sharp or pointy—like needles, scalpels, etc.—must go into a rigid “sharps” container. When they are 2/3 full we just toss these into one of the biotrash containers.

The biotrash is treated differently, as, if it went to a landfill, then the blood (and therefore the bloodborne pathogens like Hepatitis and HIV) could be exposed to people or animals. Rain could wash it into untreated water systems.

This post originally appeared on Quora. Click here to view.

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Frederick M. Brown, Getty Images
Stephen Hawking’s Memorial Will Beam His Words Toward the Nearest Black Hole
Frederick M. Brown, Getty Images
Frederick M. Brown, Getty Images

An upcoming memorial for Stephen Hawking is going to be out of this world. The late physicist’s words, set to music, will be broadcast by satellite toward the nearest black hole during a June 15 service in the UK, the BBC reports.

During his lifetime, Hawking signed up to travel to space on Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic spaceship, but he died before he ever got the chance. (He passed away in March.) Hawking’s daughter Lucy told the BBC that the memorial's musical tribute is a “beautiful and symbolic gesture that creates a link between our father's presence on this planet, his wish to go into space, and his explorations of the universe in his mind.” She described it as "a message of peace and hope, about unity and the need for us to live together in harmony on this planet."

Titled “The Stephen Hawking Tribute,” the music was written by Greek composer Vangelis, who created the scores for Blade Runner and Chariots of Fire. It will play while Hawking’s ashes are interred at Westminster Abbey, near where Isaac Newton and Charles Darwin are buried, according to Cambridge News. After the service, the piece will be beamed into space from the European Space Agency’s Cebreros Station in Spain. The target is a black hole called 1A 0620-00, “which lives in a binary system with a fairly ordinary orange dwarf star,” according to Lucy Hawking.

Hawking wasn't the first person to predict the existence of black holes (Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity accounted for them back in the early 1900s), but he spoke at length about them throughout his career and devised mathematical theorems that gave credence to their existence in the universe.

Actor Benedict Cumberbatch, a friend of the Hawking family who portrayed the late scientist in the BBC film Hawking, will speak at the service. In addition to Hawking's close friends and family, British astronaut Tim Peake and several local students with disabilities have also been invited to attend.

[h/t BBC]

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