CLOSE
Original image
Cherry Point Farm & Market

West Michigan Is Home to a Giant Lavender Labyrinth

Original image
Cherry Point Farm & Market

If you’ve ever fantasized about wandering down an endless, winding road of sweet-smelling flowers, a farm on Lake Michigan can help make your dreams come true.

Cherry Point Farm and Market in Shelby, Michigan is home to a lot of fanciful (mostly edible) things, like cherries, pies, breads, jams, fudge, and even summer fish boils. The fruit and farm market has been in operation since 1961 and is currently run by the fourth generation of the founding family. As if a homegrown roadside cherry shop wasn't meditative enough, in 2001, owner Barbara Bull started work on a lavender labyrinth, which is now a popular attraction that’s large enough to be seen on Google Earth.

With the help of artist and architect Conrad Heiderer, Bull designed an asymmetrical flower maze with an herb garden at its center. It takes about an hour to walk to the center on one long, meandering route. "Walking into the labyrinth is only half the journey," Bull told MLive. "You need to walk out again."

While it might be way too late for the primary flower season—the labyrinth’s French lavender peaks in the springtime—it continues to bloom throughout the summer, and then dries up at the end of fall when it’s collected. The space is also home to other seasonal flora like apple, peach, and cherry trees—which are ready for harvest in the autumn—and all kinds of plants that are endemic to the area, like black-eyed Susans and wild hollyhocks.

A journey into the labyrinth is free and doesn’t require reservations, so you can drop in and take a walk among the flowers anytime you like.

Know of something you think we should cover? Email us at tips@mentalfloss.com.

Original image
iStock
arrow
Art
A Beached Whale Sculpture Popped Up on the Banks of Paris's Seine River
Original image
iStock

In Paris, dozens of fish varieties live in the Seine River. Now, the Associated Press reports that the famous waterway is home to a beached whale.

Rest assured, eco-warriors: The sperm whale is actually a lifelike sculpture, installed on an embankment next to Notre Dame Cathedral by Belgian artists’ collective Captain Boomer. It’s meant to raise environmental awareness, and evoke "the child in everyone who still is puzzled about what is real and what is not,” collective member Bart Van Peel told the Associated Press.

The 65-foot sculpture has reportedly startled and confused many Parisians, thanks in part to a team of fake scientists deployed to “survey” the whale. One collective member even posted a video on social media, warning Parisians that there “may be others in the water” if they opt to take a dip in the river, The Local reported.

The whale sculpture is only temporary—but as for Captain Boomer, this isn’t their first whale-related stunt. Last summer, the collective installed a similar riverside artwork in Rennes, France, and they also once strapped a large-scale whale sculpture to the back of a truck and drove it around France.

[h/t Associated Press]

Original image
Internet Archive // Sketch the Cow
arrow
fun
Play the Sneakers Computer Press Kit from 1992
Original image
Internet Archive // Sketch the Cow

In September 1992, the computer hacking movie Sneakers hit theaters. To correspond with its launch, members of the press received a floppy disk containing a mysterious DOS program that, when launched, asked for a password. Once the reporters "hacked" their way in, they found the Sneakers Computer Press Kit. Thanks to the Internet Archive, you can play at being the film press of 1992.

It's hard to characterize exactly what this electronic press kit is. Is it a game? Sort of. It's essentially a very gentle computer hacking simulator, in which the "hacking" consists entirely of guessing passwords (complete with helpful prompts from the program itself), and the payload you discover is silly stuff like mini-biographies of Robert Redford, Dan Aykroyd, and Sidney Poitier. Still, it's a good match for the film itself, which helped set the template for Hollywood depictions of computer hacking.

A paper folder lies open on a wooden floor, with a black floppy disk on top. The folder is labeled SNEAKERS in giant red letters, as is the floppy. Inside the folder is printed material. On the right flap of the folder are instructions on how to load it.
Inside the Sneakers Computer Press Kit's paper folder. (The right flap contains installation instructions, along with a note that the studio will FedEx printed material if the user doesn't have access to a printer.)
Internet Archive // Sketch the Cow

Always remember: "My voice is my passport. Verify me." Now, get cracking on this press kit and don't be flummoxed—if you can't figure out a password right away, just wait a moment.

(Incidentally, Sneakers did also include printed materials for the press, in case they lacked a computer and/or the patience to deal with this approach. But who in the world would look at that, when they could play with this? There's also a method in the Computer Press Kit that allows the user to print out more detailed materials—provided they have a printer, and it's attached to a particular printer port on the computer.)

SECTIONS

More from mental floss studios