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9 Splendiferous Words from the Oxford Roald Dahl Dictionary

Today is the 100th anniversary of Roald Dahl's birth. Fans of the author of James and the Giant Peach, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Fantastic Mr. Fox, The BFG, and Matilda are celebrating Roald Dahl Day with phizz-whizzing birthday parties and other wondercrump activities. The publication of the Oxford Roald Dahl Dictionary this month, just in time for all the fun, gives us a chance to explore the wonderful world of Roald Dahl's words.

The dictionary covers interesting facts, mini-etymologies, and usage points for a range of everyday words from Dahl's books, but the real fun starts in the sections on "gobblefunking" with words. Gobblefunk, a verb of Dahl's own invention, means to play creatively with sound and meaning—something the author excelled at. Here are nine other examples from the Oxford Roald Dahl Dictionary.

1. ZOZIMUS

The dictionary goes from aardvark to zozimus. Aardvark makes it in because "every dictionary has to start with aardvark; otherwise it would have to start with aback, which is just too boring." Zozimus is from The BFG, and is a word for the stuff that dreams are made of.

2. GLORIUMPTIOUS

Like wondercrump and splendiferous, gloriumptious conveys pure marvelousness by blending together form and meaning from other words. In this case, glorious and scrumptious.

3. HORRIGUST

Things aren't always gloriumptious in Dahl's stories. Marvelousness has an opposite and there's no better word for it than horrigust, a blend of horrible and disgusting.

4. BIFFSQUIGGLED

Just one of the standout words in this quote from The BFG: "'You must not be giving up so easy,' the BFG said calmly. 'The first titchy bobsticle you meet and you begin shouting you is biffsquiggled." The dictionary describes it as capturing what it feels like when "your brain is reeling from a punch and is as muddled as a squiggly piece of doodling."

5. GROBBLESQUIRT

In addition to children, the witches in The Witches hunt creatures like the long-snouted grobblesquirt. They also hunt the blabbersnitch, and the crabcruncher.

6. WHIPPLE-SCRUMPTIOUS FUDGEMALLOW DELIGHT

This delicacy from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is not only the candy bar in which Charlie finds a Golden Ticket, it's also a phrase that manages to be exciting and delicious all at once.

7. CHURGLE

In Fantastic Mr. Fox, people churgle with laughter. Are they chuckling or gurgling? No need to decide. Why not both at the same time? There's a word for it!

8. HUGGYBEE

Giants need terms of endearment, too. The BFG tells Sophie to "stay where you is in my pocket, huggybee." It's a term as sweet as honey and as warm as a hug.

9. PROPSPOSTEROUS

It's almost preposterous, but with the wrong vowels and extra letters. Which makes propsposterous an even more preposterous word than preposterous. 

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Opening Ceremony
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These $425 Jeans Can Turn Into Jorts
May 19, 2017
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Opening Ceremony

Modular clothing used to consist of something simple, like a reversible jacket. Today, it’s a $425 pair of detachable jeans.

Apparel retailer Opening Ceremony recently debuted a pair of “2 in 1 Y/Project” trousers that look fairly peculiar. The legs are held to the crotch by a pair of loops, creating a disjointed C-3PO effect. Undo the loops and you can now remove the legs entirely, leaving a pair of jean shorts in their wake. The result goes from this:

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Opening Ceremony

To this:

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Opening Ceremony

The company also offers a slightly different cut with button tabs in black for $460. If these aren’t audacious enough for you, the Y/Project line includes jumpsuits with removable legs and garter-equipped jeans.

[h/t Mashable]

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This First-Grade Math Problem Is Stumping the Internet
May 17, 2017
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iStock

If you’ve ever fantasized about how much easier life would be if you could go back to elementary school, this math problem may give you second thoughts. The question first appeared on a web forum, Mashable reports, and after recently resurfacing, it’s been perplexing adults across social media.

According to the original poster AlmondShell, the bonus question was given to primary one, or first grade students, in Singapore. It instructs readers to “study the number pattern” and “fill in the missing numbers.” The puzzle, which comprises five numbers and four empty circles waiting to be filled in, comes with no further explanation.

Some forum members commented with their best guesses, while others expressed disbelief that this was a question on a kid’s exam. Commenter karrotguy illustrates one possible answer: Instead of looking for complex math equations, they saw that the figure in the middle circle (three) equals the amount of double-digit numbers in the surrounding quadrants (18, 10, 12). They filled out the puzzle accordingly.

A similar problem can be found on the blog of math enthusiast G.R. Burgin. His solution, which uses simple algebra, gets a little more complicated.

The math tests given to 6- and 7-year-olds in other parts of the world aren’t much easier. If your brain isn’t too worn out after the last one, check out this maddening problem involving trains assigned to students in the UK.

[h/t Mashable]

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