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Netflix Wants to Pay You to Binge-Watch Kids' Movies

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Since the time you were a kid, adults have been telling you that when it comes to choosing a career, you should “love what you do.” And if what you love to do is lie on the couch and relive The Magic School Bus, well, you’re in luck. Because, according to Thrillist, Netflix is currently in the market for a Kids Content Tagger.

Just what does being a Kids Content Tagger for Netflix entail? Fair question. According to the job listing, the tagger’s three main duties are as follows:

Tag Kids Content. You will help categorize kids content for different ages and for hundreds of themes, including tone, storyline, character attributes, positive messages, cautionary material, etc. You will participate in weekly Kids Tagging Meetings and monthly Tagging Workshops designed to ensure consistency across tagging.

Complete Backtagging Projects. When new tags are added or removed, we will ask you to do broad back-tagging projects that look across hundreds of titles to ensure that tags are applied appropriately.

Contribute to Kids Innovation Projects. On occasion, the Kids Content Tagger will be asked to assist with special projects. This includes, but is not limited to 1) vetting titles to determine how or if they are suitable for kids, and 2) testing and providing feedback on experimental tagging processes.

The requirements are pretty simple, too. The ideal candidate should have a pretty extensive knowledge of (plus the requisite “passion for”) kids' movies and television shows, be comfortable mastering Netflix’s categorization system, and be able to play well with others. Applicants who have a background in kids' entertainment are even more welcome.

The job, which is a remote position (read: can be done in your sweatpants), will fill up about 15 hours of your time per week. While there’s no indication of how much the gig pays, if you’re going to spend all day watching Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, you may as well get paid for it. (But, for the love of Twitter, just make sure you know the difference between a kids’ movie and a slasher flick.)

[h/t: Thrillist]

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No One Can Figure Out This Second Grade Math Problem
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Angie Werner got a lot more than she bargained for on January 24, when she sat down to help her 8-year-old daughter, Ayla, with her math homework. As Pop Sugar reports, the confusion began when they got to the following word problem:

“There are 49 dogs signed up to compete in the dog show. There are 36 more small dogs than large dogs signed up to compete. How many small dogs are signed up to compete?”

Many people misread the problem and thought it was a trick question: if there are 36 more small dogs and the question is how many small dogs are competing, then maybe the answer is 36?

Wrong!

Frustrated by the confusing problem, Angie took to a private Facebook group to ask fellow moms to weigh in on the question, which led to even more confusion, including whether medium-sized dogs should somehow be accounted for. (No, they shouldn’t.) Another mom chimed in with an answer that she thought settled the debate:

"Y'all. A mom above figured it out. We were all wrong. If there is a total of 49 dogs and 36 of them are small dogs then there are 13 large dogs. That means 36 small dogs subtracted by 13 large dogs then there are 23 more small dogs than large dogs. 36-13=23. BOOM!!! WOW! Anyone saying there's half and medium dogs tho just no!"

It was a nice try, but incorrect. A few others came up with 42.5 dogs as the answer, with one woman explaining her method as follows: "49-36=13. 13/2=6.5. 36+6.5=42.5. That's how I did it in my head. Is that the right way to do it? Lol I haven't done math like this since I was in school!"

Though commenters understandably took issue with the .5 part of the answer—an 8-year-old is expected to calculate for a half-dog? What kind of dog show is this?—when Ayla’s teacher heard about the growing debate, she chimed in to confirm that 42.5 is indeed the answer, but that the blame in the confusion rested with the school. "The district worded it wrong,” said Angie. “The answer would be 42.5, though, if done at an age appropriate grade."

Want to try another internet-baffling riddle?


Here's the answer.

[h/t: Pop Sugar]

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Open Einstein
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You Can Now Print 3D Replicas of Einstein's Childhood Toys
Open Einstein
Open Einstein

For children, playtime is an essential part of cognitive development. Now, you can give them toys that befit their genius: 3D replicas of the ones that Albert Einstein himself played with.

The LEGO Foundation, Unilever, and IKEA have launched Open Einstein, a site where you can download a 3D printing kit that allows you to make exact replicas of the wooden blocks the Nobel Prize-winning physicist played with during his childhood in Germany. "Play empowers children to create and learn for the rest of their lives," the site declares. "It is a fundamental right for all children."

The 3D printing kit provides designs for 36 toy blocks of various sizes and shapes. Einstein's wooden boxes of blocks, made by the German company Anker-Steinbaukasten, are currently held by a collector named Seth Kaller. (According to his website, you can buy them if you have $160,000 on hand.)

A dark image labeled 'Open Einstein' with wooden blocks in the background
Open Einstein

The 3D printing kit contains model instructions for only a fraction of the 160 blocks in the original set, which Einstein reportedly used throughout his childhood to erect complex structures at home. He wasn't the only famous fan of the toys: Frank Lloyd Wright, Buckminster Fuller, and other notable creatives played with the same blocks.

If you're looking for a particularly erudite toy to nurture your child's mind, blocks—whether Einstein-related or not—are a pretty good choice. The National Association for the Education of Young Children says that playing with blocks can enhance problem-solving skills, fine-tune motor skills, and boost creativity.

Your child may never come up with world-changing scientific theories, but if nothing else, hopefully the set will impart some of the genius's sense of creativity. Or at least his delightful playfulness.

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