Minnesota Dog Walks Four Miles Every Day to See His Friends in Town

Fish gotta swim, birds gotta fly, and in Longville, Minnesota, dogs gotta walk. At least one dog, anyway.

For the past 12 years, a Chesapeake-Lab mix named Bruno has been regularly walking four miles (eight miles round trip) to downtown Longville from his country home to socialize, collect treats, and hang around. His almost daily commute has made Bruno a beloved town legend.

"Everybody knows Bruno," resident Sharon Rouse told KARE11 News. "[You] may not know the people, but you'll know Bruno."

The pup belongs to Larry and Debbie LaVallee, who took Bruno in after he appeared in a box on their driveway over a decade ago. They tried to keep him tied up, but the dog’s desire to roam was too great, and he started making his way to town every day.

Now, he’s somewhat of a celebrity, with regular stops at city hall, the ice cream shop, and the back door of a local grocery store, where employees help Bruno fuel up with deli counter scraps. People know and greet Bruno, sometimes to the surprise of the LaVallees, who only know a fraction of their dog's many admirers. His wandering has even earned him the title of "Town Dog and Ambassador," which is set in literal stone in a Longville statue.

As he’s gotten older, Bruno’s trips down Highway 84 have slowed a bit. According to The Kansas City Star, the canine sometimes even takes a break, settling down right in the middle of the road. It’s no problem though—the town that opens its doors to the rambling pup is also more than willing to drive around him.

To see Bruno in action, check out the report from KARE11 below, and to see updated photos, head on over to the dog's Facebook page.

[h/t WLTX-TV]

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iStock
Good News, Dog Parents: You Can Teach Puppies as Well as Their Canine Moms Can
iStock
iStock

If you’ve ever adopted a puppy, you probably know how frustrating it can be to teach your new family member the basic tenets of common decency, like not to pee on the carpet or tear up a whole roll of toilet paper.

In other areas, though, pups are rather impressive learners, capable of mimicking some human behaviors. In fact, for some tasks, they learn just as effectively from watching people as they do from watching other dogs, including their own mothers, a new study in Nature revealed.

Researchers from Hungary and the UK took 48 young puppies of various breeds and studied the conditions under which they can be taught to open a puzzle box containing food. The experiment revealed that the puppies were able to learn how to open the box regardless of whether the task was first demonstrated by a person, their mother, or an unfamiliar dog. In other words, not only are puppies capable of social learning, but they're able to learn tasks from humans they don't know—in this case, the experimenter.

However, researchers were surprised to learn that the puppies were more likely to learn how to open the box by watching an unfamiliar dog than by watching their own mothers. That may be because puppies spend more time looking at—and thus, learning from—an unfamiliar dog that intrigues them. This differs from other species such as kittens, which “learn to press a lever for food more rapidly from their mother than from an unfamiliar adult,” the study notes.

In addition, the puppies were able to perform the task again after a one-hour break, indicating that they had retained some memory of the learning experience.

The ability of dogs to learn from humans has been recorded in previous research. A 2015 study revealed that dogs learn better by demonstration (or the “do as I do” method) than training techniques that involve a system of punishments and rewards. The "do as I do" approach probably isn't the most practical method of teaching your pup to do its business outside, but if you already have an adult dog at home, your new puppy can follow the older dog's lead and learn by example.

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Michael Hutchinson
Spiders Can Fly Through the Air Using the Earth's Electric Field
A spider exhibiting ballooning behavior.
A spider exhibiting ballooning behavior.
Michael Hutchinson

Every so often, otherwise Earth-bound spiders take to the air. Ballooning spiders can travel hundreds of miles through the air (and, horrifyingly, rain down on unsuspecting towns). The common explanation for this phenomenon is that the spiders surf the wind on strands of silk, but there may be other forces at work, according to a new study spotted by The Atlantic.

In the research, published in Current Biology, University of Bristol scientists argue that Earth's atmospheric electricity allows spiders to become airborne even on windless days. To test their hypothesis, the researchers exposed spiders in the lab to electric fields similar to those naturally found in the atmosphere.

When the electric field was turned on, the spiders began to exhibit behavior associated with ballooning—they "tiptoed" on the ends of their legs, raised their abdomens, and released silk. Spiders only exhibit this behavior when ballooning. And when they did become airborne, the spiders’ altitude could be controlled by turning the electric field on and off. When the electric field was on, they rose through the air, but when it was off, they drifted downward.

This provides a potential explanation for why spiders take to the skies on certain days but not others, and how they can fly in calm, windless weather— something scientists have puzzled over since the early 19th century. (Even Darwin was flummoxed, calling it "inexplicable," The Atlantic notes.) However, the researchers note that these electric fields might not be totally necessary for ballooning—wind alone might work perfectly fine on some days, too. But understanding more about when and how spiders become airborne could help us predict when there will be large masses of arachnids flying through the skies (and hide).

[h/t The Atlantic]

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