A New Research Vessel Named After Sally Ride Has Hit Waterways

Sally Ride was the first American woman in space, and now, a new research vessel—blazing the trail toward exciting scientific discovery—appropriately bears her name.

The Sally Ride is a cutting-edge, 238-foot ship that aims to usher in a new age of oceanic exploration. It's just completed its maiden voyage from Anacortes, Washington, where it was built, down the west coast to the Scripps Nimitz Marine Facility in Southern California. It will continue to be operated by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography under an agreement with the Office of Naval Research.

Among the many pieces of high-end equipment aboard the craft are high-efficiency diesel generators, which are not only powerful but quiet, thanks to specially designed propellers, reports WIRED, which recently went aboard the ship. That's nice enough on its own, but it also aids the scientists, who often need to listen closely to what's happening deep below the surface. The thrust of the research conducted aboard the Sally Ride is global warming’s impact on the oceans, which involves measuring everything from salinity, to temperature, to the water's composition. 

The ship has accommodations for 24 scientists and will operate with a crew of 20, and oceanographic scientists are invited to hop aboard for Science Verification Cruises beginning this fall.

You can follow R/V Sally Ride on her many adventures via Scripps, Twitter, and Facebook. WIRED spoke with Margaret Leinen, the director of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, which you can check out here.

[h/t WIRED]

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Mark Ralston, AFP/Getty Images
How a Hairdresser Found a Way to Fight Oil Spills With Hair Clippings
Mark Ralston, AFP/Getty Images
Mark Ralston, AFP/Getty Images

The Exxon Valdez oil tanker made global news in 1989 when it dumped millions of gallons of crude oil into the waters off Alaska's coast. As experts were figuring out the best ways to handle the ecological disaster, a hairdresser from Alabama named Phil McCroy was tinkering with ideas of his own. His solution, a stocking stuffed with hair clippings, was an early version of a clean-up method that's used at real oil spill sites today, according to Vox.

Hair booms are sock-like tubes stuffed with recycled hair, fur, and wool clippings. Hair naturally soaks up oil; most of the time it's sebum, an oil secreted from our sebaceous glands, but it will attract crude oil as well. When hair booms are dragged through waters slicked with oil, they sop up all of that pollution in a way that's gentle on the environment.

The same properties that make hair a great clean-up tool at spills are also what make animals vulnerable. Marine life that depends on clean fur to stay warm can die if their coats are stained with oil that's hard to wash off. Footage of an otter covered in oil was actually what inspired Phil McCroy to come up with his hair-based invention.

Check out the full story from Vox in the video below.

[h/t Vox]

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iStock
This Self-Cloning Tick is Terrorizing More States
iStock
iStock

Few arachnids are as demonized in the summer months as ticks, the parasitic little nuisances that can spread disease in humans and pets. That's not likely to change now that there's a exotic new species that can not only self-replicate, but is also poised to attack animals like a colony of swarming fire ants.

This super-tick is Haemaphysalis longicornis, or the longhorned tick, native to East Asia and imported to the U.S. by unknown means. The first North American sighting took place in August 2017 in New Jersey when a farmer walked into a county health office covered in nearly 1000 ticks after shearing a pet sheep that had been infested. The insect was then spotted in Virginia, West Virginia, and Arkansas, with caution advised in Maryland. As of this week, it’s now a confirmed resident of North Carolina, The Charlotte Observer reports.

H. longicornis invites more dread than a conventional tick for several reasons. It can “clone” itself, with females laying up to 2000 genetically identical eggs without any assistance from a male, a process called parthenogenesis. Reproduction is faster, with offspring appearing in just six months compared to two years for common deer ticks. It’s also an aggressive biter, nibbling on any animal flesh it can latch on to, and is able to transfer a host of diseases in the process—some of them fatal. In addition to Lyme, longhorned ticks can transmit the flu-like ehrlichiosis bacteria and the rare Powassan virus, which can cause brain inflammation.

The news isn’t much better for livestock. Given enough opportunity, the ticks can siphon enough blood from an animal to kill it, a process known as exsanguination. The attack can become so concentrated that pets have been spotted with ticks hanging from them like bunches of grapes.

New Jersey officials have confirmed the tick has survived the winter by burrowing underground, a somewhat ominous sign that the invasive species might be durable enough to become a widespread problem. Experts recommend taking all the regular precautions, including wearing long pants when outdoors, using repellent, and examining yourself and your pets for ticks. While the longhorned tick hadn’t yet displayed a taste for human flesh, it’s better to be safe than sorry. As for the sheep: following a chemical treatment, she made a full recovery.

[h/t Charlotte Observer]

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