11 Dorm Rooms That Make College Life Look Glamorous

For some dorm dwellers, interior design means a cork board, a bean bag chair, and an Animal House poster held up with unreliable sticky tack. The students living in these residence halls went above and beyond to decorate their homes away from home. Even if your college days are long behind you, these photos will make you nostalgic for loud roommates and instant ramen.

1. THE DORM FIT FOR ROYALTY // UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI

Competing to have the most extravagant room in the residence hall has become something of a tradition at Ole Miss. Freshmen roommates Lindy Goodson and Abby Bozeman gave their classmates a run for their money this semester when photos of their luxurious digs (pictured above) went viral. According to Buzzfeed, their supplies were sourced from spots like T.J. Maxx, Marshalls, Pottery Barn, and local furniture and antique stores. The headboards, pillows, and bed skirts were all custom-made. If the furnishings survive a year of freshman shenanigans, Goodson and Bozeman plan to reuse them and give some away as hand-me-downs.

2. THE FAIRYTALE READING NOOK // SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY

Interior decorator Dawn Thomas’s body of work includes some seriously fabulous dorm rooms. Each fall she works with students from southern colleges including the University of Alabama, the University of Georgia, and Southern Methodist University. In this SMU space she transformed in Fall 2014, the lower bunk served as a cozy seating area complete with fairytale string lights. After living with that for a semester or two, we imagine it would be hard to study any place else.

3. THE HOTEL UA // UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA

Thomas was also the mastermind behind this sharp look. According to her, furnishing a college dorm to look like an upscale hotel was easier than you might suspect. She wrote on Facebook, “Alabama has the smoothest dorm move in, it should be a model for all dorm move ins.”

4. THE COZY CORNER // ABILENE CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY

The collection of pillows on display on this bed give the room some serious character (though it might make getting any actual sleep a challenge).

5. THE MINIMALIST PARADISE // LIBERTY UNIVERSITY

The resident of this dorm has found a way to make the white, sterile walls of her building look high-fashion. String lights wrapping above and around the loft bed soften up the room, while house plants add pops of color.

6. THE DREAMY RETREAT // HYPER ISLAND

This student enrolled in Hyper Island’s Motion Creative program in Sweden knows the importance of good lighting. The gorgeous light fixture creates the perfect atmosphere for curling up and taking a nap between classes.

7. UNDERGRAD CHIC // UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI

Out of context, it’s hard to believe this picture was taken inside a college dorm. The fun and sophisticated style of this Ole Miss room wouldn’t be out of place in a luxurious apartment.

8. PRETTY IN PASTEL // UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA

If the room above looks like it’s been ripped from a furniture catalogue, that’s because it belongs to a student with a mom in interior design. With a playful mix of patterns and a splash of midwestern charm, it’s easy see to this room becoming the envy of UAB’s Blazer Hall.

9. THE BOHEMIAN HAVEN // UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

Any dorm room with a lava lamp and a tapestry can pass for “bohemian,” but this room at the University of Arizona takes the style to new heights. Hopefully the Christmas light/billowy fabric combination is up to the building’s fire code.

10. THE SNUG SANCTUARY // UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI

It pays to have a parent with an eye for design. When Julia Grant moved into her Ole Miss dorm room this semester, her interior decorator mom lent her expertise to revamp it into the comfiest space on campus. The beds have been topped with fuzzy throw blankets and pillows perfect for snuggling up with at the end of the day. Even the furry rug looks more comfortable than the beds most college students are forced to sleep on.

11. ON-CAMPUS LUXURY // UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI

This photo further proves that no college does dorm decorating better than the University of Mississippi. From the monogrammed pillows to the plush headboards, the glamorous design features in this room would make it hard to feel homesick.

Header/banner images courtesy of Instagram.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Sagar.jadhav01, Wikimedia Commons // ;CC BY-SA 4.0
arrow
language
New 'Eye Language' Lets Paralyzed People Communicate More Easily
Sagar.jadhav01, Wikimedia Commons // ;CC BY-SA 4.0
Sagar.jadhav01, Wikimedia Commons // ;CC BY-SA 4.0

The invention of sign language proved you don't need to vocalize to use complex language face to face. Now, a group of designers has shown that you don't even need control of your hands: Their new type of language for paralyzed people relies entirely on the eyes.

As AdAge reports, "Blink to Speak" was created by the design agency TBWA/India for the NeuroGen Brain & Spine Institute and the Asha Ek Hope Foundation. The language takes advantage of one of the few motor functions many paralyzed people have at their disposal: eye movement. Designers had a limited number of moves to work with—looking up, down, left, or right; closing one or both eyes—but they figured out how to use these building blocks to create a sophisticated way to get information across. The final product consists of eight alphabets and messages like "get doctor" and "entertainment" meant to facilitate communication between patients and caregivers.

Inside of a language book.
Sagar.jadhav01, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 4.0

This isn't the only tool that allows paralyzed people to "speak" through facial movements, but unlike most other options currently available, Blink to Speak doesn't require any expensive technology. The project's potential impact on the lives of people with paralysis earned it the Health Grand Prix for Good at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity earlier in June.

The groups behind Blink to Speak have produced thousands of print copies of the language guide and have made it available online as an ebook. To learn the language yourself or share it with someone you know, you can download it for free here.

[h/t AdAge]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
SmithGroupJJR
arrow
Design
Futuristic New Street Toilets Are Coming to San Francisco
SmithGroupJJR
SmithGroupJJR

San Francisco’s streets are getting shiny new additions: futuristic-looking public toilets. Co.Design reports that San Francisco’s Department of Public Works has chosen a new design for self-cleaning street toilets by the architectural firm SmithGroupJJR that will eventually replace the city’s current public toilets.

The design is a stark contrast to the current San Francisco toilet aesthetic, a green knockoff of Paris’s Sanisettes. (They’re made by the same company that pioneered the Parisian version, JCDecaux.) The tall, curvy silver pods, called AmeniTREES, are topped with green roof gardens designed to collect rainwater that can then be used to flush the toilets and clean the kiosks themselves. They come in several different variations, including a single or double bathroom unit, one with benches, a street kiosk that can be used for retail or information services, and a design that can be topped by a tree. The pavilions also have room for exterior advertising.

Renderings of the silver pod bathrooms from the side and the top
SmithGroupJJR

“The design blends sculpture with technology in a way that conceptually, and literally, reflects San Francisco’s unique neighborhoods,” the firm’s design principal, Bill Katz, explained in a press statement. “Together, the varied kiosks and public toilets design will also tell a sustainability story through water re-use and native landscapes.”

San Francisco has a major street-poop problem, in part due to its large homeless population. The city has the second biggest homeless population in the country, behind New York City, and data collected in 2017 shows that the city has around 7500 people living on its streets. Though the city started rolling out sidewalk commodes in 1996, it doesn’t have nearly enough public toilets to match demand. There are only 28 public toilets across the city right now, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

These designs aren’t ready to go straight into construction first—the designers have to work with JCDeaux, which installs the city’s toilets, to adapt them “to the realities of construction and maintenance,” as the Chronicle puts it. Then, those plans will have to be submitted to the city’s arts commission and historic preservation commission before they can be installed.

[h/t Co.Design]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios