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YouTube // Netscape communications
YouTube // Netscape communications

Happy 20th Birthday, Netscape Navigator 3.0!

YouTube // Netscape communications
YouTube // Netscape communications

On August 21, 1996, Netscape released its massively popular Navigator 3.0 browser. Although Microsoft was busy amping up its Internet Explorer browser, Netscape Navigator peaked around 85% of browser marketshare in the mid-1990s. (Obviously, this changed as the browser wars raged.)

Although we forget it now, in 1996 web browsers weren't all free! Netscape sold its browsers in standard and "Gold" editions, starting at $49. Technically, students were allowed to use the software for free...and magically, virtually every computer user became a student (ahem).

To look back at Netscape history on this auspicious date, let's check out Code Rush, a documentary about the Netscape team when they created the Mozilla browser, right before AOL acquired Netscape. It's a heck of a late-1990s time capsule.

(Note: If you'd like to download Code Rush, The Internet Archive has you covered.)

If you're curious what Netscape Navigator 3.0 looks like today trying to browse the web, let this excruciating video be your guide. You might also enjoy the release notes for the browser, which are mostly concerned with plugin compatibility.

If that's not enough 1990s browser nostalgia for you, here's the keynote address from the 1996 Internet Developer's Conference, featuring Marc Andreesen and others. There is a lot of 1990s hair going on here (and some fuzzy audio):

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Cahoots Malone
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Revisit Your Favorite '90s Screensaver With This Free Game
Cahoots Malone
Cahoots Malone

In the '90s, a significant amount of computing power was devoted to generating endless brick mazes on Windows 95. The screensaver has since become iconic, and now nostalgic Microsoft fans can relive it in a whole new way. As Motherboard reports, the animation has been re-imagined into a video game called Screensaver Subterfuge.

Instead of watching passively as your computer weaves through the maze, you’re leading the journey this time around. You play as a kid hacker who’s been charged with retrieving sensitive data hidden in the screensaver of Windows 95 before devious infomancers can get to it first. The gameplay is pretty simple: Use the arrow keys to navigate the halls and press Q and click the mouse to change their design. Finding a giant smiley face takes you to level two, and finding the briefcase icon ends the game. There are also lots of giant rats in this version of the screensaver.

Screensaver Subterfuge was designed by Cahoots Malone as part of the PROCJAM 2017 generative software showcase. You can download it for free for Windows, macOS, and Linux from his website, or if playing a game sounds like too much work, you can always watch videos of the old screensaver on a loop.

[h/t Motherboard]

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As Big as a What? How Literary Size Comparisons Change Over Time
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iStock

Many humans are bad at visualizing what measurements really mean unless you give them a comparison. Tell someone a space is 360 feet long and they'll probably just blink; say it's the length of a football field and you might get a nod of comprehension. That's why many writers use size comparisons rather than precise measurements in non-technical works. (It also helps convince people your work wasn't written by a robot.) But the comparisons that writers use reflect the culture and time period they're in—tell an ancient Roman something is the size of a credit card or a car, and you're not going to get very far.

As spotted by Digg, programmer and data visualization whiz Colin Morris recently performed an experiment that demonstrates how these kinds of object comparisons change over time. Morris mined the vast Ngram dataset of English-language Google Books for occurrences of the phrase "the size of ___" between 1800 and 2008, then ranked the top results by popularity overall and in specific centuries. Some of the results made perfect sense (England has phased out the shilling; basketball didn't exist for most of the 1800s), while others were more surprising (why did we stop referring to cats as a popular size comparison in the 21st century?).

Overall, Morris found that items from the natural world have fallen into decline as reference points, while sports analogies have exploded onto the scene. (Morris wonders whether this has to do with the rise of leisure time, and/or the mass media that exposes far more spectators to sports than ever before.) Some of the specific results also have intriguing stories to tell: We no longer talk about the size of pigeon's eggs largely thanks to the extinction of the passenger pigeon, which was once the most numerous bird in the United States. The numbers of city pigeons just don't compare—when was the last time you saw one of their eggs?

There is one clear winner across the centuries, however: peas. These tiny legumes were the most popular reference point in the 1800s and they remain so today. The same is true of runner-up the walnut. Let it not be said we have nothing in common with our ancestors.

Here are the top five items in each century that Morris investigated:

1800s

1. pea
2. walnut
3. pinhead
4. egg
5. hen's egg

1900s

1. pea
2. walnut
3. pinhead
4. egg
5. orange

2000-2008

1. pea
2. walnut
3. quarter
4. football field
5. egg

For the full list, head over to Colin Morris's site.

[h/t Digg]

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