CLOSE
TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images
TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images

Baby Born on International Flight Gets 1 Million Airline Miles

TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images
TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images

A recent flight from Dubai, United Arab Emirates to Manila, Philippines took an unexpected turn when a pregnant woman went into labor about halfway through the nine-hour journey, 36,000 feet in the air, The Guardian reports. According to another passenger, the woman returned to her seat with baby Haven shortly after giving birth in the front of the plane. It was the first time a child has been born on a Cebu Pacific Air flight, and in celebration, the carrier awarded Haven and her family 1 million travel points.

The flight diverted to land in Hyderabad, India to get the mother and child—who arrived five weeks before her due date—medical attention. Luckily, there were two nurses among the passengers willing to assist with the birth, which took place in a “more spacious area in the front of the plane,” according to one passenger’s account. Two of the flight attendants with nursing training were on hand to help as well, and when the baby was born, several passengers with infants themselves offered clothes and other necessities to the new mom.

Missy Berberabe Umandal via Facebook

Pregnancies typically last somewhere between 37 and 43 weeks, and many airlines place restrictions on pregnant women traveling in their third trimester, often requiring a medical clearance for flights after the 28-week mark. Cebu Pacific requires a medical certificate from a physician clearing a pregnant woman for travel after the 34th week.

This isn't the first baby to be born mid-flight, but it's definitely a rarity. In the past, a few lucky babies born on airplanes have been awarded free flights for life, though giving birth in the sky can make nailing down your baby's nationality a little tricky.

It’s certainly not the easiest way to get airline rewards points, but little Haven will no doubt be a loyal Cebu Pacific customer in the future: Her 1 million points are worth almost $108,000.

[h/t The Guardian]

Know of something you think we should cover? Email us at tips@mentalfloss.com.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
travel
Looking for a New Career? Airlines Will Need 637,000 More Pilots Before 2035
iStock
iStock

If you're looking for a career path with plenty of job prospects, you could do worse than earning a pilot's license. As Bloomberg reports, Boeing—one of the biggest plane manufacturers in the world—estimates that in order to keep up with travel demand, the world will need to get 637,000 more pilots in the air over the next 20 years.

Across the world, more people than ever before are traveling by plane, with the number of passengers increasing 7 percent between 2015 and 2016, as the International Air Transport Association reported last year. Those numbers are expected to keep growing, and the organization estimates that by 2035, there will be 7.2 billion air passengers per year traveling across the world, thanks to a combination of rising salary trends and decreasing ticket costs.

That doesn't necessarily mean a huge influx of travelers hitting U.S. airports. Much of this increase will likely come from China, India, and other countries across Asia with expanding air travel industries. And as a result of needing more planes and routes to transport the growing demand for flights, airlines are going to need to hire more pilots (and other staff) to keep their planes in the air. That's why North America and Europe will need 117,000 and 106,000 more pilots by 2035, respectively, compared to the Asia-Pacific region's 253,000.

In short, the career prospects of pilots are looking pretty promising, especially if you speak Mandarin. You might want to look into flying lessons.

[h/t Bloomberg]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
Live Smarter
The Best Ways to Avoid Germs While Flying
iStock
iStock

The weeks you spent avoiding sniffling colleagues around the water cooler can seem all for naught the moment you board a plane during cold and flu season. But as Travel + Leisure points out, having a few of these proactive tricks in your arsenal could help you avoid other passengers’ germs.

As you pack, stash a travel-sized bottle of nasal spray in your carry-on. Mucous membranes in our noses protect us from infectious agents, but airplane air can dry them out, so remember to apply regularly while flying.

Once you're seated, an antibacterial gel or wipes will take care of the microbes chilling on your tray table. When beverages and snacks are served, wipe down the tray table's surface, which has been called one of the dirtiest places on the plane. And skip the possibly unsafe airline coffee or tea.

Air travelers are typically crammed into planes like sardines, but there are still ways to limit your close contact with others. For example, linger toward the back or front, away from dense throngs of people, while waiting in line to board. Once you’re on the plane, opt for a window seat if you have a choice. Aisle seats typically have more leg room, but they also expose passengers to more germ-rich people walking in the aisle.

One last tip for staying healthy while flying the friendly skies: After you're seated, switch on the overhead vent to increase air circulation. You'll breathe easier if you're not sitting in a spot where germs are concentrated.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios