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TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images
TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images

Baby Born on International Flight Gets 1 Million Airline Miles

TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images
TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images

A recent flight from Dubai, United Arab Emirates to Manila, Philippines took an unexpected turn when a pregnant woman went into labor about halfway through the nine-hour journey, 36,000 feet in the air, The Guardian reports. According to another passenger, the woman returned to her seat with baby Haven shortly after giving birth in the front of the plane. It was the first time a child has been born on a Cebu Pacific Air flight, and in celebration, the carrier awarded Haven and her family 1 million travel points.

The flight diverted to land in Hyderabad, India to get the mother and child—who arrived five weeks before her due date—medical attention. Luckily, there were two nurses among the passengers willing to assist with the birth, which took place in a “more spacious area in the front of the plane,” according to one passenger’s account. Two of the flight attendants with nursing training were on hand to help as well, and when the baby was born, several passengers with infants themselves offered clothes and other necessities to the new mom.

Missy Berberabe Umandal via Facebook

Pregnancies typically last somewhere between 37 and 43 weeks, and many airlines place restrictions on pregnant women traveling in their third trimester, often requiring a medical clearance for flights after the 28-week mark. Cebu Pacific requires a medical certificate from a physician clearing a pregnant woman for travel after the 34th week.

This isn't the first baby to be born mid-flight, but it's definitely a rarity. In the past, a few lucky babies born on airplanes have been awarded free flights for life, though giving birth in the sky can make nailing down your baby's nationality a little tricky.

It’s certainly not the easiest way to get airline rewards points, but little Haven will no doubt be a loyal Cebu Pacific customer in the future: Her 1 million points are worth almost $108,000.

[h/t The Guardian]

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Here Are the Best and Worst Days for Christmas Travel
Scott Olson/Getty Images
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Flight delays are always a hassle, but the holidays add an extra layer of stress. No one wants to be stuck at the airport while their family is digging into Christmas dinner. And even if you fly long before the holiday itself, airports are always more hectic during the holiday season. Between the high volume of travelers and the whims of winter weather, getting off the ground doesn’t necessarily feel like a given when you leave for the airport.

But not all airports and days are equally prone to flight issues, according to U.S. Bureau of Transportation data from the last five years, as analyzed by the electric supply company Elite Fixtures, which previously analyzed the worst airports for Thanksgiving travel.

A green chart lists travel delays and flight cancellation statistics by date.
Elite Fixtures

On average, you’re less likely to be delayed if you’re traveling the week before Christmas or on the holiday itself, the data shows. December 25 has actually had the lowest percentage (18 percent) of delayed flights over the last five years, giving you a good excuse if you want to flee to the airport directly after your family’s holiday meal. Traveling December 18 and 19 is also a good idea, since only 26 percent of flights are typically delayed on those days.

A red chart details travel delay and cancellation statistics by date.
Elite Fixtures

Beware the 22nd and 23rd of December, though. On those days, an average of 32 percent and 34 percent of flights get delayed, respectively. The few days after Christmas are also likely to stick you with an annoying delay—33 and 34 percent of flights are delayed on the 26th and 27th.

A green-and-gray U.S. map highlights the 10 best airports for holiday travel with plane icons.
Elite Fixtures

Airlines don’t encounter flight difficulties in equal measure across all airports, though. If you’re flying through one of the airports above, congratulations! The likelihood of getting delayed is less than at the Houston or Oakland airports, both hubs with the highest rates of holiday flight delays in the U.S.

Unfortunately, no matter what day you fly and where you fly from, there's no way to really predict whether your flight will leave on time. You'll just have to hope that Santa brings you the seamless holiday travel experience you put on your Christmas list.

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Mapped: The 10 Airports Where You’re Most Likely to Get Stuck Over Thanksgiving
William Thomas Cain/Getty Images
William Thomas Cain/Getty Images

Every year, some unlucky Americans end up stranded at U.S. airports trying to get home for Thanksgiving. But your risk of getting stuck at the airport for hours on end varies depending on where you’re flying. Using five years of data from the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics, Elite Fixtures collected statistics on the worst airports to travel through around the Thanksgiving holiday, a time when airports are traditionally at their busiest.

The results show that delays aren't necessarily tied to the airports where the weather tends to be worst or those that see the most passengers. What airline you are flying, whether you’re on a regional flight, and the route you’re traveling can all affect your likelihood of getting stuck, and so the percentage of short-haul flights or the number of, say, Delta flights out of a certain airport might affect its overall score negatively. Still, you might want to avoid airports like Chicago’s Midway or the Oakland airport. Good luck with Houston or Dallas, too.

Below, the 10 worst:

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