Political Facebook Posts Don't Change Minds, Study Says

Getty Images
Getty Images

Been posting political rants all over Facebook this election season? They may not be doing much good, according to a recent study. WIRED reports that the social media marketing firm Rantic decided to research the way Facebook users react to the political messages their friends post, and the results were less than encouraging.

Rantic polled 10,000 Facebook users and found that, by and large, political posts were extremely unlikely to change anyone's views. However, they were likely to annoy people and even inspire them to unfriend posters.

Rantic found that 94 percent of Republicans, 92 percent of Democrats, and 85 percent of Independents said they'd never changed their view of an issue based on a Facebook post. About two-thirds of the study's participants also said that social media was not an appropriate place to discuss politics, while around half said they judged others based on their political opinions. A smaller, though not insignificant, number (12 percent of Republicans, 18 percent of Democrats, and 9 percent of Independents) said they’d unfriended someone because of a political post.

But that doesn't stop Facebook users from posting political messages of their own: Rantic also found that while the vast majority of Facebook users said they’ve remained steadfast in their political views after reading conflicting opinions on Facebook, 39 percent of Republicans, 34 percent of Democrats, and 26 percent of Independents had still posted political messages on their own Facebook pages.

[h/t WIRED]

Scamp the Tramp Named World’s Ugliest Dog

Scamp the Tramp won the World's Ugliest Dog contest at the Marin-Sonoma County Fair on June 21, 2019 in Petaluma, California.
Scamp the Tramp won the World's Ugliest Dog contest at the Marin-Sonoma County Fair on June 21, 2019 in Petaluma, California.
Justin Sullivan, Getty Images

In a society overrun by fashion magazines, beauty contests, and Instagram models, it’s nice when the not-so-photogenic are appreciated. Take Scamp the Tramp, this year's winner of California's World’s Ugliest Dog competition. “[He’s] Scamp the Champ now,” Scamp's owner, Yvonne Morones, said of her pup's hard-won victory. “We had to change his name.”

Scamp, who was the 2018 competition's runner-up, came out on top of the dog pile against 18 other adorably ugly pooches. His winning looks are courtesy of matted fur that “no conditioner can calm,” a tongue that appears to perpetually hang from his mouth, and bat-like ears. According to his official biography, Scamp’s pastimes include partaking in various community service activities and serving as an uncle to numerous foster kittens.

UPI reports that Morones is experienced in grooming champions; she has claimed the World's Ugliest Dog title several times before with two of her previous pooches. Her dog Nana was even reigning champ from 1996 to 2002.

Morones rescued Scamp from a Los Angeles shelter in 2014, and the two quickly clicked. “It was on the way home that I knew I made the right choice,” she said in a press statement. “There we were, two strangers in a car on the way home to a new start. Bob Marley was playing ‘One Love,’ and I looked over and little Scamp was bobbing his head. It was like he knew he had found his forever home.”

First-prize winners of the World’s Ugliest Dog contest take home a trophy, $1500 in earnings that will also be matched in donations to animal charities, and validation that they’re certifiably good boys and girls.

Want to Retire a Millionaire? Here's How Much You Need to Put Into Your 401(k) Each Month

iStock/AndreyPopov
iStock/AndreyPopov

Despite stereotypes that accuse young people of mishandling their finances, Millennials are actually more likely than Baby Boomers and Gen Xers to contribute money to their 401(k) plans. But if you want to retire rich, simply having a tax-free retirement account may not be enough. CNBC recently broke down exactly how much of your salary you need to contribute in order to hit the $1 million mark when you withdraw your 401(k) funds at age 65.

Many financial advisors recommend contributing 10 to 15 percent of your gross income to your retirement plan—or less, if that number exceeds $19,000, the 401(k) contribution limit for 2019. Depending on the rate of return on your investment portfolio and your salary, you could contribute less than that and still retire a millionaire. The key is starting early enough: The later you wait to open your 401(K), the more of your salary you'll need to set aside in order to catch up.

Here's CNBC's break down of what you need to invest per month to save $1 million by retirement, starting at three different ages and looking at three possible rates of return.

Age 25

With a 4 percent rate of return: $843.24 per month
With a 6 percent rate of return: $499.64 per month
With an 8 percent rate of return: $284.55 per month

Age 30

With a 4 percent rate of return: $1090.78 per month
With a 6 percent rate of return: $698.41 per month
With an 8 percent rate of return: $433.06 per month

Age 40

With a 4 percent rate of return: $1938.57 per month
With a 6 percent rate of return: $1435.83 per month
With an 8 percent rate of return: $1044.53 per month

Of course, not everyone can contribute this much to a 401(k) consistently throughout their career. Salaries and living expenses fluctuate, and even if dropping 15 percent of your paycheck into a retirement plan is easy to do now, that may not always be the case. The reverse may also be true.

If you can't meet the goals laid out above at this point in your life, that doesn't mean you should delay saving for retirement altogether. When it comes to a 401(k), financial planners emphasize that putting aside something—even 1 or 2 percent of your salary—is much better than saving nothing at all. Not sure where to begin? Here are some tips for getting started with your 401(k).

[h/t CNBC]

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