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Canadian Couple Lives on Their Own Floating Island

When most of us say we’re "going off the grid," it usually means we won’t have cell service for a few hours. For artists Catherine King and Wayne Adams, it’s meant living on a homemade island near Tofino, British Columbia for the last 24 years.

The couple—he is a carver and she is a retired ballerina, writer, and painter—began building the fortress in 1992 and have since constructed a house, dance floor, lighthouse, four greenhouses, and more. It was all done with a hand saw and hammer; as Wayne told Great Big Story in the video below: "I know every board and nail by name." The island is tied to the shore and Wayne estimates that it weighs about 500 tons.

The couple has dubbed the area "Freedom Cove," and their subsistence living involves catching fish, growing produce, and generating electricity with solar energy or, occasionally, a generator. They collect drinking water from a nearby waterfall or through rainwater, and they raised their two kids there.

To get to Freedom Cove, one has to travel by water, but you’re welcome to make the trek: Wayne and Catherine offer tours for inquiring minds.

Wayne told Great Big Story that he never gets seasick and, in fact, "When I go to town I get land sick." After seeing the amazing structure, we can understand why.

[h/t Digg]

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Courtesy of Sotheby's
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History
Found: A Rare Map of Australia, Created During the 17th Century
Courtesy of Sotheby's
Courtesy of Sotheby's

More than 40 years before Captain James Cook landed on Australia’s eastern coast in 1770, renowned Dutch cartographer Joan Blaeu created an early map of the Land Down Under. Using geographical information gleaned from Dutch navigator Abel Tasman in the 1640s, it was the first map to include the island state of Tasmania and name New Zealand, and the only one to call Australia “Nova Hollandia.”

Very few copies—if any—of the 1659 map, titled Archipelagus Orientalis (Eastern Archipelago), were thought to have survived. But in 2010, a printing was discovered in a Swedish attic. After being restored, the artifact is newly on display at the National Library of Australia, in the capital city of Canberra, according to news.com.au.

The seller’s identity has been kept under wraps, but it’s thought that the map belonged to an antiquarian bookseller who closed his or her business in the 1950s. For decades, the map sat amidst other papers and books until it was unearthed in 2010 and put up for auction.

The National Library acquired the 17th century wall map in 2013 for approximately $460,000. After a lengthy restoration process, it recently went on display in its Treasures Gallery, where it will hang until mid-2018.

As for other surviving copies of the map: a second version was discovered in a private Italian home and announced in May 2017, according to Australian Geographic. It ended up selling for more than $320,000.

[h/t news.com.au]

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iStock
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geography
What's the Difference Between a Lake and a Pond?
iStock
iStock

Around 71 percent of the Earth's surface is covered in water, which is why geographers have coined so many names to describe the forms it takes. But what’s the real difference between, say, a lake and a pond, a spring and an oasis, or a creek and an arroyo?

Vox gets granular with geography in the video below, explaining the subtle distinctions between everything from a bay (a part of an ocean, surrounded by water on three sides) to a barachois (a coastal lagoon, separated from the ocean by a sand bar). The five-minute explainer also provides maps and real-life examples, and describes how certain bodies of water got their names. (For example, the word geyser stems from geysa, meaning "to gush.")

Guess what? A geyser is also a type of spring. Learn more water-based trivia—and impress your nature-loving friends the next time you go camping—by watching the video below.

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