CLOSE
David McNew // Getty Images
David McNew // Getty Images

Sea Levels Are Probably About to Rise Exponentially

David McNew // Getty Images
David McNew // Getty Images

Get ready for some unexpected beachfront property, inland-dwelling friends. A new study finds that sea level rise is going to be increasing exponentially, Bloomberg reports. 

A new paper in Scientific Reports analyzes sea levels measured by satellite and new climate models, arguing that the 1991 volcanic eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines—the second-largest eruption of the 20th century—cooled the globe and affected rainfall that would have otherwise contributed to sea level rise. In turn, this anomalous eruption obscured how much sea levels were really rising over the decades, since satellites first started observing sea level changes in 1993. 

Essentially, scientists first began recording high-quality sea level data by satellite during an incredibly weird time. Comparing data from the early '90s to now can’t predict the full effects of climate change, the study’s authors find, because the volcanic event skewed the pattern.

If these models are correct, scientists should start to see sea level rise accelerating exponentially in the next few years, barring any sort of crazy event like a gigantic ash-spewing volcanic eruption. Enjoy whatever your current waterfront hangout is before the tide comes for us all. 

[h/t Bloomberg]

Know of something you think we should cover? Email us at tips@mentalfloss.com.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Oliver Design
arrow
environment
Eco-Friendly Cruise Ship Design Includes Vertical Farms, Solar Sails, and a "Plant Kingdom"
Oliver Design
Oliver Design

If you want to reduce the environmental impact of your next vacation, you could do better than boarding a cruise ship. Luxury liners consume tons of fuel and produce even more sewage that is often dumped directly into the ocean. But cruises don’t have to be disastrous for the Earth by design: As inhabitat reports, the newly-designed Ecoship aims to be the most eco-friendly cruise ship on the seas.

The futuristic vessel was envisioned by the firm Oliver Design for the Japanese humanitarian organization Peace Boat. For decades, Peace Boat has been spreading its message of global social change through “peace voyages” that sail around the world. The Ecoship will embody this mission by being kinder to the environment than conventional cruise ships. Ten photovoltaic solar sails extend from the deck like giant fins, collecting clean energy to supplement the hybrid engine. Retractable wind generators harvest energy as well.

According to Oliver Design, the Ecoship will produce 30 percent less carbon dioxide than modern cruise ships. The vessel’s electrical system has also been updated with both the solar sails and kinetic floors onboard providing power. The biggest change comes in the sewage operations: Both the waste and water will be fed through a closed loop, which means that whatever’s produced is filtered and recycled again and again.

As these features are working behind the scenes, passengers will get to see some Earth-friendly amenities up close. A “plant kingdom” that covers five decks will consume surplus waste, water, and carbon dioxide produced by the ship, while vertical farms will be used to grow vegetables for meals.

When the Ecoship sets sail in 2020, it will continue to spread awareness of the changing climate that inspired its design. Oliver Design writes on its webpage, “The organization [Peace Boat] wants the Ecoship to be a turning point for the shipping industry and a flagship for raising awareness on climate change. As well as hosting Peace Boat’s voyages throughout the world, the ship will be used to stage exhibitions on green technology at the 100 ports where it is expected to dock each year.” You can check out the concept art for the project in the video below.

[h/t inhabitat]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
Live Smarter
The Most (and Least) Expensive States for Staying Warm This Winter
iStock
iStock

It’s that time of year again: Temperatures outside have plummeted, while your monthly heating bill is on the rise. If you want an idea of how much heat will cost you this winter (perhaps you blocked out last year’s damage to your bank account), one reliable indicator is location.

Average energy expenses vary from state to state due to factors like weather, house size, and local gas prices. Using data from sources including the U.S. Energy Information Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency, WalletHub calculated the average monthly utility bill totals for all 50 states plus Washington D.C. in 2017.

Source: WalletHub

The personal finance website looked at four energy costs: electricity, natural gas, car fuel, and home heating oil. After putting these components together, Connecticut was found to be the state with the highest energy costs in 2017, with an average of $380 in monthly bills, followed by Alaska with $332 and Rhode Island with $329.

That includes data from the summer and winter months. For a better picture of which state’s residents spend the most on heat, we have to look at the individual energy costs. Michigan, which ranks 33rd overall, outdoes every other state in the natural gas department with an average bill of $60 a month. Alaska is close behind with $59, followed by Rhode Island With $58.

People living in Maine prefer oil to heat their homes, spending $84 a month on the fuel source. All six New England states—Maine, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts—occupy the top six spots in this category.

So which state should you move to if you want to see your heating bill disappear? In Florida, the average household spends just $3 a month on natural gas and $0 on heating oil. In Hawaii, on average, the oil bill is $0 as well, and slightly higher for gas at $4. Of course, they make up for it when it comes time to crank up the AC: Both states break the top 10 in highest electricity costs.


WalletHub

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios